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HISTORICAL PAPERS 



RELATING TO THE 



JACOBITE PERIOD 



Only 525 Copies printed. 
No. 




PRINCESS LOUISA STUART 



Historical 






3-acobit 



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URT 




Historical papers 



RELATING TO THE 



Jacobite 




16991750 



EDITED BY 



COLONEL JAMES ALLARDYCE, LL.IX 



VOLUME SECOND 



ABERDEEN 

{DritueD for tlje jfteto &palbfng Club 
MDCCCXCVI 



J)B 
R5 



'//L 



PRINTED BY 

MII.NE AND HUTCHISON 

ABERDEEN 



IRew SpalMna Club. 

Founded nth November, iSS6. 

patroness : 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 



O IFF ICE 



FOE, 1895-96. 



pccfftcnti 

THE EARL OF ABERDEEN, LL.D. 



THE DUKE OF RICHMOND AND GORDON, K.G., 

D.C.L., LL.D. 
THE DUKE OF FIFE, K.T. 
THE MARQUIS OF HUNTLY, LL.D. 
THE MARQUIS OF BUTE, K.T., LL.D. 
THE EARL OF ERROLL, LL.D. 
THE EARL OF STRATHMORE. 
THE EARL OF SOUTHESK, K.T., LL.D. 
THE EARL OF KINTORE, LL.D. 



THE EARL OF ROSEBERY, K.G., LL.D. 

THE LORD FORBES. 

THE LORD SALTOUN. 

THE LORD PROVOST OF ABERDEEN. 

THE PRINCIPAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN. 

SIR GKORGE REID, P.R.S.A., LL.D. 

JAMES A. CAMPBELL of Stracathro, M.I'., LL.D. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON of Kinmundy, LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor DAVID MASSON, LL.D. 



Ortuimo flOcmbcis of Council : 



Colonel James Allarclyce of Culquoich, LL. D. 

John Bulloch, Aberdeen. 

George Cadenhead, Procurator- Fiscal, Aberdeen. 

The Rev. James Cooper, D. D., Aberdeen. 

William Cramond, LL.D., Cullen. 

Peter M. Cran, City Chamberlain, Aberdeen. 

The Rev. J. Myers Danson, D.D., Aberdeen. 

Charles B. Davidson, LL.D., President of the Society 

of Advocates, Aberdeen. 
The Hon. and Right Rev. Bishop Douglas, D.D., 

Aberdeen. 

William Dunn of Murtle. 
John Philip Edmond, Haigh. 
James Ferguson, Edinburgh. 
Alexander M. Gordon of Newton. 
Henry Wolrige-Gordon of Esslemont. 
The Rev. Walter Gregor, LL.D., Bonnyrigg. 
John A. Henderson, Aberdeen. 
Sir William Henderson, LL.D., Aberdeen. 
Brigade-Surgeon Lieut. -Col. W. Johnston of Newton 

Dee, M.L). 

The Rev. William Forbes-Leith, S.J., Selkirk. 
George Arbuthnot-Leslie of Warthill. 



The Rev. Robert Lippe, LL.D., Aberdeen. 

David Littlejohn, Sheriff- Clerk, Aberdeen. 

Peter Duguid-M'Combie of Easter Skene. 

James Matthews of Springhill, LL.D. 

The Kev. John G. Michie, Dinnet. 

James Moir, LL.D., Co-Rector of the Grammar 

School, Aberdeen. 
Alexander M. Munro, Aberdeen. 
Charles Rampini, LL.D., Sheriff-Substitute, Elgin. 
Alexander Ramsay, LL.D., Banff. 
Alexander W. Robertson, Librarian, Public Library, 

Aberdeen. 

John Forbes Robertson, London. 
The Rev. James Smith, B. D., Aberdeen. 
Sir David Stewart of Banchory, LL.D. 
The Rev. William Temple, D.D., Forguc. 
Alexander Walker, LL.D., Aberdeen. 
George Walker, Aberdeen. 
Robert Walker, Aberdeen. 
John Forbes White, LL.D., Dundee. 
Professor John Dove Wilson, LL. IX, Aberdeen. 
Robert M. Wilson, M.D., Old Deer. 
The Rev. John Woodward, LL.D., Montro^p. 



Secretary : 
PETER JOHN ANDERSON, University Library, Aberdeen. 

^Treasurer : 
FARQUHARSON TAYLOR GARDEN, 18 Golden Square, Aberdeen. 

'HuMtors : 
GEORGE COOPF.R, C.A., Aberdeen; and WILLIAM MILNE, C.A., Aberdeen. 



PREFACE TO VOL. II. 

A S the "Historical Papers" came from the printer, it was 
** found that the whole would have formed a very bulky 
volume, it was therefore decided to reserve a portion of the 
collection for a second issue. Several additional papers have 
since been placed at my disposal, and appear in an Appendix. 
A full Index to all the papers will be found at the end of this 
volume. 

Besides the illustrations which had been retained as suitable 
for the papers now produced, I have, through the courtesy and 
kindness of the Right Honourable The Earl of Moray, been 
permitted to obtain from His Lordship's collection at Darnaway 
Castle a reproduction of the fine painting of Henry Benedict 
Stuart, Cardinal of York, by Blanchet ; and from the Scottish 
National Portrait Gallery I have had contributed a likeness of 
Princess Louisa Mary, daughter of James II., and Mary Beatrice 
of Este. I beg to offer my best acknowledgments for both 
these illustrations, which, with the likeness of the Chevalier de 
St. George, represented at a later period of his life as " Jacobus 
Tertius," and of Prince Charles Edward, complete the series of 
the most notable members of the House of Stuart of the times 
to which these papers refer. 

I am conscious of much that has been wanting on my part 
in editing these papers. For all shortcomings I must beg the 
indulgence of the members of the Club. 

J.A. 

CULQUOICH, AugJlSt, 1896. 



INTRODUCTION TO VOL. II. 

PAPER XXX. contains Depositions against Jacobites, and 
Depositions at Jacobite Trials, and has been contributed 
by Mr. D. Murray Rose from MS. Documents, the sources 
of which he describes. 

Mr. Murray Rose has already rendered good service to the 
Club, his work in connection with " The Records of Aboyne " 
having been warmly spoken to by the noble editor of that 
volume The Marquis of Huntly. 

The following introduction to this paper is taken from 
Mr. Murray Rose's Notes, and, besides several original letters, 
contains graphic descriptions of some of the most prominent of 
the Jacobite leaders of the '45, whose share in the rising formed 
the subject of the enquiries described in these documents. 

Amongst the illustrations reserved for this volume will be 
found portraits of some of the more famous Jacobites mentioned 
in the paper. 

Than Mr. Murray Rose it would be difficult to find any one 
who possesses a more intimate knowledge of the history of the 
various Scottish families whose members were implicated in the 
'45, and of the circumstances that led up to, and the events that 
took place during and after, the time that Charles Edward made 
his romantic appeal to his countrymen to reinstate the Stuarts 
on the throne of their ancestors, and it is greatly to be desired 
that he should write the "Story of the "45." 

In the hope that he may do so, I am unwilling to appropriate 

for this Introduction more of the valuable notes he has kindly 

2 



X. INTRODUCTION. 

forwarded to me for selection, than the portions which actually 
refer to the individuals mentioned in the following pages. The 
documents now printed, and the introductory notes relating to 
them, will, it is believed, be found to be of very great interest 
they form a most valuable addition to these Historical Papers : 

The ruthless slaughter which followed Cumberland's victory 
at Culloden was not to be the final reckoning. Vengeance 
demanded that the most prominent of the Jacobites should 
become amendable to the law for high treason recently enacted. 
Thus another deadly blow was dealt to the cause through the 
forfeiture of those who followed Prince Charlie, should they not 
surrender to justice before the I2th July. Numerous witnesses 
were cited before a Committee of the House of Commons in 
May, 1746, and their depositions against thirty-nine of the 
Prince's followers will be found in these pages. The evidence 
tendered was of a purely formal character, yet it serves to 
illustrate the progress of events, as well as to show how serious 
a matter it was to wear the white cockade. 

In Jacobite families anecdotes are handed down concerning 
the merry pranks played by Charles upon his followers. He 
was a Stuart of the old race full of merriment and gaiety ; 
when occasion offered leading the frolic with an abandon which 
little suggested the great enterprise on hand. O'Sullivan seems 
to have been the victim of many escapades, and his dignity was 
so ruffled by the treatment he received, at the hands of the 
high-spirited Prince and his companions, that he threatened to 
return to France, and well would it have been for the cause had 
he done so. 

The allusions to the personal appearance of the Jacobites 
are often amusing and quaint. There is the Viscount Dundee, 
" a low fat man and squint-eyed " ; Lord John Drummond, a 
"pretty tall, jolly man" of dark brown complexion, who is 



INTRODUCTION. xi. 

neither "fat nor lean," and was doubtless the happy medium. 
Sir William Gordon of Park, rigged out in a "sort of highland 
clothes"; the traitor Murray of Broughton, in his scarlet dress 
and white cockade, is described as a " well-looking little man of 
a fair complexion." Then there is the veteran laird of Glen- 
bucket, who, very " old and crouched," rode a grey highland 
beast, his friend Ardshiel being described as a "big fat man 
troubled with a lethargy," while the young laird of Airth was a 
"pretty tall man," neither "thin nor fat." 

From the evidence it will be seen that the service rendered 
by the Earl of Kellie was not of the highest order, and the men 
raised by him were incorporated in Roy Stewart's regiment, but 
his presence among the ranks of the "disaffected" led to his 
spending upwards of three years in prison. A man of different 
calibre was the Viscount of Strathallan, appointed Governor of 
Perth. He had taken part in the '15, and was made prisoner at 
Sheriffmuir, but this did not deter him from engaging actively 
for Charles, who appointed his son as A. D.C. He fell at 
Culloden, where he held a command, and, although attainted, 
the forfeiture did not take effect his son James died at Sens in 
June, 1765. 

The career of the Lord Forbes of Pitsligo is one of the 
most fascinating. A noble of irreproachable character, he 
buckled on his broadsword in his sixty-eighth year : raised a 
squadron of horse, marching at their head into England. After 
Culloden's fatal day he escaped into hiding, and, making a futile 
attempt to quash his attainder on account of misnomer, was 
compelled to reside principally among his tenantry. It is 
impossible to give here even a summary of the stories of his 
romantic escapes and adventures. Possessing a profound trust 
in Providence, he seemed on occasions to recklessly defy the 
emissaries of the law ; anon he was forced to seek refuge in a 
hollow opening under a small bridge, which was scarcely large 



xii. INTRODUCTION. 

enough to contain him. Sometimes he assumed the guise of a 
beggar, and openly wandered over his estate, his secret being so 
well preserved that more than once he actually received alms 
from the soldiers who were in pursuit of him. During the 
closing years of his eventful life he was unmolested by the 
Government, and died peacefully on 2ist December, 1762, in 
his eighty-fifth year. 

Lord Elcho's name is one not much cherished in Jacobite 
circles, or traditions, although he rendered good service 
throughout the '45. His rankerous and bitter temper brought 
about many incidents which are best forgotten. As colonel of 
the Life Guards he was indefatigable in his exertions to promote 
their efficiency. Like the other leaders he was extremely jealous 
of the Irish influence, and, never given to the mincing of words, 
did not hesitate to express his opinions more freely than prudence 
warranted. When his attainder compelled him to reside abroad, 
he was treated with the utmost generosity by his relatives ; they 
granted him ,10,000 in lieu of all claims on the Estate of 
Wemyss a liberal sum considering the burdens affecting the 
property. His mother sacrificing her terce on his behalf, for a 
time he lived with her, but unfortunately his intractable temper 
led to divisions between them, and so great did her exasperation 
become, that she endeavoured by every means in her power to 
break down the family arrangement which had enabled him to 
enjoy comparative affluence. Nor were his relations with Prince 
Charles such as to commend him ; they both grew selfish and 
peevish under misfortune, and Elcho continued in a petulant 
spirit because the Prince had never repaid the .1500 he 
advanced to him in 1745. 

It is a relief to turn from a character, soured by disappoint- 
ment, to the career of the Master of Lovat, who was obliged to 
engage in the rising under circumstances which evoke as much 
sympathy now as in 1746. Virtually driven into rebellion against 



INTRODUCTION. xiii. 

his inclinations, the instrument of a designing and unscrupulous 
father, his filial obedience at all times won for him the respect of 
all. Writing on the 28th March, 1745, Lord Lovat thus refers 
to him : " My eldest son, who is, perhaps, one of the prettiest 
youths in Britain, does not take a sixpence worth for his pocket, 
or back, without asking my consent, and he does not fare a bit 
the worse for that." It was an implicit obedience to parental 
authority that forced him into a course he foresaw meant ruin, 
and one need not be surprised at his " damning " the white 
cockade with an energy as fierce as that with which, in after life, 
he fought the enemies of king and country at the head of his 
Fraser Highlanders. Great zeal and gallantry distinguished his 
career the recognition of his splendid services being the satis- 
faction he had of seeing his ancestral property restored ere he 
died in 1782. 

There was not a braver leader, or a better soldier, than Lord 
George Murray in the Jacobite army : undoubtedly he was the 
commanding genius, but unfortunately he was also a man who 
never outgrew his boyhood. The proud and petulant spirit he 
exhibited in the schoolroom at Perth in 1710 (when he pleaded 
with his father to send him to another seminary, because he 
conceived his tutor had affronted him, through refusing a 
privilege he was disposed to abuse), was characteristic of his 
life, and explains the bickerings at Charles' council table. His 
career is better known than that of any of the Prince's friends, 
for around his doings, sayings, and actions there has waged 
unenviable and bitter controversy. Reserved and haughty, he 
had never won affection as did his companion-in-arms, Lord 
Lewis Gordon. 

" O send Lewie Gordon hame " is a ballad which testifies to 
the warm feelings entertained for this scion of the House of 
Gordon, and how pathetic is the story of the life of this young 
man of promise. Being brother of the " Cock of the North," 



xiv. INTRODUCTION, 

his appearance at the Court of Charles at Holyrood evoked the 
greatest enthusiasm. Bred in the navy, he possessed to a large 
degree the bluff, winning qualities of the sailor, and the zeal 
with which he joined the Prince's standard led not a few of his 
brother's tenantry to don the white cockade. Yet there were 
others whom he forced to " fecht for Charlie " by stern measures. 
The Prince appointed him Lord- Lieutenant of Aberdeen* and 
Banffshires, with a special commission to endeavour to persuade 
his brother the Duke of Gordon to throw in his lot with the 
insurgents. Another plan entrusted to him was the capture of 
Lord President Forbes, but the laird of Culloden was not to be 
caught by either Lord Lewis or Lord Lovat, who also had 
designs against his person. On his way northwards Lord Lewis 
was entertained by the Duke of Atholl the Marquis of Tulli- 
bardine and promised to be entirely guided by his counsels. 
It was the 25th of October ere he reached Huntly Castle, and 
writing from thence three days later to Secretary Murray of 
Broughton, he acquaints the latter with his proceedings. He 
had met the gentlemen of the district at Aboyne Castle, and 
also at Gordon of Blelack's house, but was surprised to find how 
remiss the people were in taking up arms, a circumstance he 
attributed to the influence of the Presbyterian ministers, against 
whom he determined to adopt stringent measures. 

The doings of Lord Lewis have been chronicled in the 
previous volume. In some measure his actions were guided by 
the counsels of Glenbucket and his kinsman, the Duke of Perth. 
To the latter he wrote making apology for his inability to 
capture the President, or to persuade his brother either to join 
the Prince, or contribute to the Jacobite exchequer, yet his own 
zeal in the cause was great as ever. The remissness of the 
gentlemen to take up arms roused his wrath, while the conduct 
of the "parsons who inculcated lies in the people's heads" led 

* See Vol. I., p. 209. 



INTRODUCTION. XV. 

him to threaten them. Nor did he confine himself to threats of 
" dire punishment " against the clergy. He summoned them 
before him to answer for their virulent denunciation of Charles, 
and dismissed them with the assurance that next time they 
offended he would deal with them in an effectual manner. 
While in command in the north his principal achievement was 
the defeat of Macleod of Macleod at Inverurie. Among the 
Culloden Papers is a letter he wrote upon that occasion to the 
vanquished chief : 

"Aberdeen, 27 Dec: 1745. 

"Sir, I received your letter by express last night, dated Gordon Castle 
the 24th. All the care in our power has and shall be taken of your 
wounded men ; and all the prisoners that were taken under their arms 
shall meet with all the civility in our power. But for Regent Chambers, 
Forbes * of Eight [Echt], and Maitland oi Pitrichie, who have acted the 
Infamous part of spies and informers, and the two last especially, who 
have given a great deal of bad advice to a certain great man, who shall 
be nameless, it is neither consistent with my honour or inclination to treat 
them as prisoners of war. I shall take care to order supplies to be given 
to all the prisoners who want them, and the wounded men are as well 
taken care of as our own. I shall send you a list of the prisoners and 
wounded, with any useless papers and letters as soon as possible ; and 
any other thing that we can reasonably agree to shall be done with 
pleasure." 

Disaster was soon to wreck the enterprise. The victory of 
Falkirk, which caused the brutal Hawley to exclaim, " My 
heart is broke," was but the flickering light which was finally 
extinguished on Drummossie Moor. Although reported cap- 
tured, Lord Lewis was among those who escaped, and 
who can now tell the story of his perilous adventures ? 
Sometimes lurking in the secret hiding holes in Gordon Castle, 
and the Castles of Huntly and Aboyne, again finding refuge in 
the hills and forests of Birse and Braemar, until he got on board 

* See p. 487. 



XVI. INTRODUCTION. 

the friendly vessel which bore him away from the land he 
loved so well. Then'came prostration through the sufferings he 
endured : the fell hand of sickness laid him low, and he wrote to 
an official high in place to intercede with the king : 

"Dunkirk, Feb. 10, N.S., 1751. 

" May it please your Grace Though I have not the honour of being 
acquainted with your Grace, yet I hope you will excuse this piece of 
freedom. It is now a long time since I apply'd to the Duchess of Gordon, 
my Mother, to assure her of my great desire to get home to Britain. 
She has already made some interest, and if your Grace would do me the 
favour to intercede with his Majesty for to grant me a pardon, I will give 
all the assurances possible of my living all the rest of my life as becomes 
a peaceable and dutiful subject. My health has been for many months 
in a bad situation, and all that I desire and beg of your Grace is to have 
the goodness to consider my misfortunes, having no other purpose but to 
retire and live with my Mother in a quiet way. General Mordaunt will, 
I hope, give his assistance. I hope your Grace will excuse this piece of 
freedom, and I have the honour to subscribe myself with great submission, 

" Your Grace's most obedient and most humble servant, 

"LEWIS GORDON." 

Ill-health had broken the spirit of the vivacious youth he 
pined for the heath-clad hills of Aberdeen and Banffshires. Oh, 
if he only would be permitted to see Scotland once again he 
would live so quietly, and it was this yearning for his " ain 
countrie " that made the exile plead with his brother in the 
following strain : 

"Sens, November 3Oth, 1751. 

" My Dear Lord Duke The very bad state of health I have been in 
for a year has given me a great inclination to return home. Since I had 
the happiness of seeing you at Paris I have been 16 or 17 times blooded 
for violent fevers, and now I am subject to violent cholicks and pains in 
the stomach. Neither dare I take any severe exercise for fear of having 
one of these terrible fevers, and I assure you that my constitution is 



INTRODUCTION. xvii. 

become so tender that I am not fit to follow any publick business. Now, 
my Lord Duke, I shall begin with humbly begging pardon of you for 
my foolish behaviour, which I beseech you to forget, and I hope my dear 
brother, in consideration of my misfortunes and the melancholy state of 
my health, you will have the goodness to apply to His Majesty for leave 
to me to come home. I am not so ambitious as to think of the attainder 
being taken off, and all I want is just to live peaceably in Scotland 
without ever meddling with public affairs. I am ready to make all the 
submissions that his Majesty and the ministry asks of anybody, and 
whatever your Grace promises them in my name I assure you on honour 
and conscience I shall perform. Now, my dear brother, give me leave to 
exhort you by our past friendship, and my sincere regard for you to 
comply with my request, and if it please God that we meet I shall make 
it my honour and happiness to behave to you with all the humility and 
gratitude that you can desire from an affectionate brother and a faithful 
friend. There is one Mr. Brissack lives at Endficld, who is an old 
acquaintance and a good friend of mine, that will do all in his power to 
serve me, and if you please you may safely communicate your sentiments 
about me to him. I am soon to write to Mr. Brissack. In the time of 
my sickness I was guilty of some silly things, but that is all made up. 
This letter comes under cover to a friend of mine in the City of London. 
All I have to add is to wish you, my dear Lord Duke, all health and 
happiness, and the same to your young family. I beg my humble duty 
to the Duchess, and I remain, my dear brother, with the utmost respect 
and regard, 

"Your unfortunate brother and faithful friend, 

"LEWIS GORDON." 

"N.B. The proper direction to me is to ' Mr. George Grant,' to the 
care of Mr. Theodore Hay, Merchant at Boulogne-sur-mer." 

"Mr. George Grant" pled in vain. His relatives had oft- 
times tried to make his position as cheerful as possible, yet spies 
abroad and spies at home prevented their good intentions taking 
effect. His pathetic letters never reached their destination, for 
they were intercepted and perused by officials in whose breasts 

3 



xviii. INTRODUCTION. 

sympathy found but little place. And yet when we read the 
heart-rending stories with which these men became acquainted, 
with the piteous tales of misery revealed in the correspondence 
of proud and high-born lairds, the marvel is that they suppressed 
appeals with such callous indifference, and by a system of 
espionage, despicable in the extreme, prevented the friendly aid 
which might have brightened many noble lives. Lord Lewis 
lived in hope, unaware of the fact that his desires were well 
known to the authorities, and again addressed his brother : 

" Sens, January i/th, 1752. 

" My Dear Lord Duke Some time ago I had the honour to write 
you a letter which I hope you received, and now I shall begin with 
wishing your Grace joy of your newborn son, to whom and the Duchess 
I wish most sincerely health and happiness. Now, my Lord Duke, it is 
a long time since I had a strong inclination to return home, and for two 
years past my health has been extremely bad, but for this last year I 
have been so extremely ill that I am quite incapable of doing business, 
or of bearing much fatigue. I have repented sincerely of my past 
conduct, and have suffered very sufficiently for it. Now what I have to 
beg of you is that in consideration of the melancholy state of my health 
you will have the generosity and goodness to apply to his Majesty and 
the Ministry for my leave to come home. All I want is a simple 
permission to live peaceably in Scotland, and all my ambition is to 
assure your Grace that all my life shall be employed to live as becomes 
a dutiful and faithful subject to his Majesty, and you will see by my 
obedience and submission in every shape to your will that I am deserving 
of your Grace's esteem and protection. Moreover I am ready to make 
all the submission that his Majesty may desire. I think it proper to 
acquaint you that the Duke of Norfolk has promised to apply for my 
leave to come home. Having often experienced your Grace's goodness 
for me I have no reason to doubt of it upon this occasion, and if I have 
in any shape disobliged you I most humbly and heartily ask your pardon 
and forgiveness. I hope you will have the goodness to excuse this 
trouble. All I shall add is my hearty and sincere wishes for health and 
prosperity to all your family, and now, my dear Lord Duke, I shall 



INTRODUCTION. xix. 

conclude with assuring you that I ever am with the greatest esteem and 
regard, 

" Your most dutiful brother and most faithful friend and servant, 

"LEWIS GORDON." 

While he still lingered laid low on the bed of pain and of 
death spies reported that he was in Scotland, where his 
relatives were indeed astonished at his prolonged silence, and 
the youth, stricken of God, reluctantly concluded they had cast 
him off. A final appeal in the belief that the balmy genial air 
of Deeside might even yet prolong life's flickering llame, had 
the same fate as the others, so he sorrowfully turned his face to 
the wall : fate had decreed that " Bonnie Lewie Gordon " was 
to be laid to rest as an exile in a foreign land, far from kith and 
kin, and the country he loved so dearly. 

The leanings of the Duke of Perth from early infancy were 
in favour of the Stuarts, and in 1 740 he was one of an associa- 
tion engaged to venture lives and fortunes in their behalf, 
provided the king of France sent over troops to assist in any 
attempt to recover the British throne. Ample evidence of 
Perth's zeal, in forcing his tenantry to take up arms, will be 
found in the proceedings against Macgrouther, Buchanan, and 
others. He exercised all his influence to prevent the jealous 
bickerings at the Councils of the Jacobites, and when, through 
the petulance of Lord George Murray, he became leacjer of the 
army, so hearty was his enthusiasm that he much preferred to 
efface himself and serve as a volunteer. At Culloden, and 
elsewhere, he behaved with great gallantry, especially when, on 
the fatal day which blasted the hopes of the Stuarts, the 
Macdonalds stood sullen and inactive, he placed himself at 
their head, vowing that if they advanced to the charge he 
would henceforth call himself Macdonald. The pride of the 
clan was, however, too deeply wounded, for they retired without 



XX. INTRODUCTION. 

striking a blow. Perth escaped from the dreadful slaughter only 
to perish from wounds and privation. He died on the voyage 
to France on nth May, 1746, his estates were confiscated, and 
his title attainted in the person of his younger brother, the 
"jolly" Lord John, who was colonel of the Royal Scots in the 
French Service. Recruiting for Lord John's regiment had gone 
on for several years in Scotland, notwithstanding the utmost 
vigilance of the Government. When Charles inarched into 
England, Lord John Drummond at the head of a considerable 
body of men and a train of artillery landed at Montrose. They 
took part in the battles of Falkirk and Culloden, whence Lord 
John escaped to France, afterwards serving with distinction in 
Marshal Saxe's army, dying in 1747. 

Lord Ogilvie's connection with the '45 is one of peculiar 
interest. He joined the Jacobites at Perth with over 600 men, 
and rendered good service by his loyal performance of duty. 
He escaped to France, where he commanded a regiment known 
as "Ogilvie's Regiment," becoming a lieutenant-general in the 
service. He was pardoned in 1778, but deeming this remission 
insufficient to " restore his corrupted blood to its original purity," 
an act of parliament was passed in 1783 to the effect that "the 
blood of the said David Ogilvie be, and the same is hereby 
restored to its original purity, as if no such attainder had ever 
been." He survived for long afterwards, loved and respected as 
Earl of Airly, and died at Cortachy on 3rd March, 1803. 

His brother-in-arms, John, Lord Nairn, was one of the 
veterans of the '15, whose capture and forfeiture on that occasion 
had no deterrent effect, for he took up arms immediately on 
Charles' landing. He fled to France, where he died in July, 
1770 ; his brother Robert, who assumed the name of Mercer on 
his marriage with Jean Mercer of Aldie, being killed at Culloden. 

A detailed account of the conduct of the traitor Murray of 
Broughton is beyond the scope of these notes, and the record 



INTRODUCTION. xxi. 

of his life has still to be written. In his later years he occupied 
himself in preparing memoirs of the campaign, which have yet 
to see the light. There are numerous letters extant serving to 
show how unscrupulous was the man even when acting as 
secretary to the Prince. After the dispersion of the Jacobites 
he sought refuge with his kinsman, Hunter of Polmood, where 
he was seized and brought to London. To save himself he 
readily consented to betray his friends, and the Government, 
while not slow to take advantage of the information he placed 
at their disposal, did not treat him with any great consideration. 
He was admitted as king's evidence against Lovat, who desig- 
nated him with contempt as "the most abandoned of mankind." 
Ample use was made of him as an unscrupulous tool in their 
purposes, but the authorities paid little attention to his piteous 
appeals to save his effects. The creditors swooped down on his 
belongings, "using all means, for the recovery of their debts, 
that the law allows of" a circumstance which greatly troubled 
him, as evidenced by the following letter among the MSS. in 
the British Museum : 

"London, I3th Oct., 1747. 

" My Lord I am extremely sorry to be under the necessity of 
troubling your Grace with a letter, but the unhappy situation of my 
affairs in Scotland is such as I hope will plead my excuse. My creditors 
are now, and have for some time past been, using all means for recovery 
of their debts that the law allows of, while I am not in a capacity to 
attend my affairs myself, nor to appoint one with sufficient authority in 
my name. This, my Lord, makes me have recourse to your Grace to 
beg my discharge, which alone can prevent the small remains I now have 
from being carried off by my creditors, which if not at liberty will not be 
in my power to save how soon the Courts of Justice meets which is the 
first of next month. At the same time I petition your Grace for this 
favour, pardon me to present to you the great losses I have sustained at 
Broughton, of which I have endeavoured to procure pretty exact accounts, 
and upon a computation, very much below the value, I find they amount 



XXli. INTRODUCTION. 

to 3819 6s. 8d., without including several things of considerable value 
not charged. I again beg your Grace will pardon this trouble, and allow 
me the honour to subscribe myself with the utmost regard and esteem, 

" My Lord, 
" Your Grace's most obedient and most humble servant, 

"JOHN MURRAY." 

He lived to bitterly rue the treachery which profited him so 
little, and his succession to the Baronetcy of Stanhope in 1770 
was not as balm to his wounded conscience. 

How different were the deeds and career of the brave old 
Glenbucket ! Fiercely enthusiastic, he endured the wracking 
pains of rheumatism (produced through the wounds inflicted 
by an attempt at assassination by the men of Badenoch 
many years before) and followed Prince Charlie. Neither age 
nor infirmity could, however, quell the fiery energetic spirit of 
this veteran of the '15 ; mounted on his highland garron there 
was none more active or vigilant. His was the name to conjure 
with, and, whether it was heard by the peasantry of Aberdeen- 
shire or the Merse, it conveyed a vague sense of terror and 
alarm. Even the king trembled in his closet on hearing the 
uncouth appellation of this highland leader. Recruits Glen- 
bucket wished, and recruits he must have, and any attempt 
to shirk his call was met with condign punishment, as the treat- 
ment of Charles Gordon, Alexander Leath, and John Burnet 
bears evidence. After the last fight he was compelled to seek 
refuge in France, but misfortune and disaster did not curb his 
iron soul, his frail frame contained a dauntless spirit. When 
compelled to reside at Boulogne-sur-mer in 1749, because of 
the cheapness in living, he was the only Jacobite who was 
"jolly and hearty." His only sorrow was the shocking treat- 
ment received by his daughters at home, and his inability to 
provide for them in France. 



INTRODUCTION. xxiii. 

Space would fail us were we to record the doings of the 
Cameron men, who were the " darlings " of the enterprise. 
"The Camerons are all gentlemen," says one writer, and certain 
it is the regiment in a measure was worthy of its chief. Was 
it not Lochiel's adhesion which had set the "heather on fire?" 
Was not the capture of Edinburgh due to the Camerons ? Was 
it not a Cameron who planned and engaged to carry out the 
daring escalade of the castle frustrated by the burgess Lorimer ? 
and was it not for a Cameron that a young lady of noble lineage 
left her English home to follow the fortunes of her " Highland 
Laddie ? " Besides, who but an honest Cameron could with 
gravity grant those receipts (by which we can trace the location 
of the clan) for pots, brogues, worsted, needles, &c., which were 
"appropriated for the use of his Majesty's army," and would be 
paid for when the " king enjoyed his own again." But, alas ! 
there is another side to the story, the truth is the men were as 
reluctant as the others to join the standard of the Prince. 

On the Qth November, 1745, John Cameron declared before 
the authorities in Edinburgh that " six weeks ago Dr. Cameron, 
brother to Lochiel, came to Cameron of Dungallon's, a nephew 
of Lochiel's, and now Major in his regiment, and forcibly brought 
from thence 500 men, mostly of the name of Cameron, threatening 
that if they did not come off directly he would burn their houses 
and cut them in pieces. But declares that upon their march 
several of them deserted, and particularly the night before they 
left Dalkeith twelve of them made their escape, as did the 
declarant and other three, now prisoners, from Kelso Tuesday 
last, and believes most of them will follow if they can get off." 
John Cameron was not the only clansman to make such a 
sweeping declaration. On the same day Hugh Cameron was 
examined and corroborated the above, adding that " he and 
several others attempted to escape when at Edinburgh, but 
were seized upon by Lochiel, and some of the Life Guard at a 



XXl'v. INTRODUCTION. 

little distance from the city, and Lochiel beat them severely 
with his whip." A third member of the clan said that " Dr. 
Cameron killed four of his cows before he consented to go with 
him." In this manner many of the Camerons were forced to 
take the field, and making every allowance it is evident there is 
very little exaggeration in their story, for the facts elicited at 
the trial of Allan Cameron of Callart show how great was the 
pressure brought to bear on the tenantry, who very unwillingly: 

" Left their bonny highland hills, 

Their wives and bairnies dear, 
To draw the sword for Scotland's lord, 
The young Chevalier." 

Sir Alexander Macdonald and Macleod of Macleod broke 
their plighted faith, and raised men on behalf of the House of 
Hanover. A considerable number of Clanranald's men took 
the field under the chiefs son ; while the other branches of Clan 
Donald were led by young Angus of Glengarry and Donald 
Macdonald of Lochgarry ; the brave and bold Keppoch, whose 
name was really Alexander, headed his own men, and met a 
hero's death at Culloden rather than survive their disgraceful 
conduct ; Archibald, son of the "swaggering" Coll of Barrisdale, 
and the Laird of Glencoe were leaders of their respective bands. 
How these gentlemen recruited their regiments is told in the 
declaration of Roger Macdonald, in the Public Record Office : 

" Eight days after the battle of Prestonpans Glengarry's son threatened 
all his father's tenants to burn their houses and hang them if they did 
not follow the Prince's army, by which means he gathered thirty men and 
brought them to Edinburgh. But Glengarry's son left the rebels, and he 
(Roger) with the rest deserted after him, as did also the Laird of Barrisdale 
from Dalkeith. Glengarry's son's name is Angus the second son who 
is married to Strowan's niece." 

This Angus was accidentally killed at Falkirk, and while desertion 
was indeed rife among the Macdonalds, the fact is that he left 



INTRODUCTION. xxv. 

the army for a time in disgust, but Barrisdale was sent north on 
a mission to Lovat and others. On 28th September, 1745, 
there is a pass by Lochgarry to a party of eight men who were 
sent north to bring back deserters. Yet such as remained 
greatly distinguished themselves, until their sullen conduct at 
Culloden brought them undying reproach. 

Nor was the laird of Cluny behind in dealing stringently 
with his poor tenantry. The story of how the chief of the 
Macphersons was captured by the Jacobites is matter of history, 
but his subsequent conduct in forcing out his dependents is in 
marked contrast to the noble generosity of these in his day of 
straits and adversity. Threatening to destroy their cattle and 
burn their houses were the methods by which he brought men 
to fight under the " Bratach Uaine," and unfortunately in many 
cases he was even better than his word, for his treatment of 
some of his dependents was cruel in the extreme. Yet around 
the " hide and seek " life of this chief, who failed to keep the 
tryst at Culloden, there has arisen much that is mythical and 
absurd. The romance of the whole story is the remarkable 
way in which the people of Badenoch protected and preserved, 
with unexampled kindness, the man who had done them so 
much injury. 

The Maclauchlans and Mackinnons followed the evil example 
of the other clans. Thirty of the latter tribe deserted for the 
sufficient reason that " they were sensible of being in a wrong 
cause." Among those who suffered heavily were the Stewarts 
of Appin, the name of whose leader, Ardshiel, recalls General 
John Campbell's kindly service to Isabel Haldane, the lady of 
Ardshiel. There was Lockhart of Carnwarth specially excepted 
from all acts of amnesty, and yet had the good fortune to escape 
the axe of the executioner. 

4 



XXVI. INTRODUCTION. 

Where is the man who remains unmoved at mention of the 
pathetic story of the loyal Oliphants of Cask ? 

" Thee Nairn and Cask with rapture could I sing 
Still true to God, your country and your king, 
Loyal and just, sincere as honest truth, 
The same in manhood as in early youth." 

Father and son joined Charles at Blair Athole on ist Sept., 
and the old laird was appointed Depute-Governor of Perth. 
When on the occasion of Lord Strathallan's absence the 
burgesses sought by fierce attacks to recover the place, he 
behaved with conspicuous valour. He returned northwards 
with Charles, and fought at Culloden, whence father and son 
escaped after a series of exciting adventures. They sought 
refuge in France, and under their assumed names of " John 
Whyte" and "John Brown" there is frequent reference to their 
life abroad in the reports of Government spies. They endured 
privation with unflinching courage, but as the days passed by 
the heart of the elder exile yearned for his own country, and, 
above all, to be near the " burying place of his ancestors." His 
desire that his ashes might mingle with those of his kindred was 
happily attained, for he died at Cask in 1769 in his seventy-sixth 
year. Lawrence, the younger, was a man of highest spirit ; his 
sturdy loyalty to a hopeless cause and a luckless race ; the zeal 
with which he celebrated Jacobite anniversaries ; and the disdain 
with which he declined to sue for pardon from George of Hanover, 
unless his own king thought it worth while to write approving 
of his doing so, exhibits a picture of steadfastness akin to 
fanaticism. The prompt manner in which he dealt with his 
" wavering " chaplain Cruickshank, and how he tried to prevent 
his son Lawrence from going to Court, "because," he writes, 
" though formerly Jacobites have been presented and continued 
Jacobites, yet a two-faced person is not a character worthy of 
imitation," marks him as really the Jacobite par excellence. 



INTRODUCTION. xxvii. 

Romance is kindled anew at the name of the yellow-haired 
laird of Dumnaglas, who so bravely led the Mackintoshes and 
fell with his face to the foe, and for whom the beautiful Miss 
Campbell died through grief. Then there was Malcolm Ross of 
Pitcalnie, whose ambition it was to acquire the Earldom to 
which his family aspired, and whose conduct well-nigh broke 
the heart of Lord President Forbes ; while the adventures of 
the portmanteau of Hay of Restalrig is quite a story in itself, 
and will for ever bear testimony to the honesty of the guid folks 
of Aberdeenshire. These then were among the men against 
whom depositions were made in absence, and whose persona, 
fortunately for themselves, escaped the meshes of the law. 

There were others, however, who were not so fortunate. 
When the highland army retreated to Scotland the Manchester 
Regiment was left to defend Carlisle. On the capture of this 
place by the Duke of Cumberland on 3Oth December, in terms 
of the capitulation, the governor and officers surrendered them- 
selves at the gates, while the rest of the garrison retired to the 
cathedral. The depositions at the trial of these Jacobites are 
abbreviated from the papers of Sir John Strange among the 
Egerton MSS. in the British Museum. 

A special commission was appointed, which sat at St. 
Margaret's Hill, Southwark, on 23rd June, 1746, and during 
the following two days bills of indictment were found against 
thirty-six of the principals taken at Carlisle. The indictment 
narrates that these men : 

" Not having the fear of God in their hearts, nor having any regard 
for the duty of their allegiance, but being moved and seduced by the 
instigation of the devil, as false traitors and rebels against our said 
present sovereign lord the king, their supreme, true, natural, lawful, and 
undoubted sovereign lord, entirely withdrawing that cordial love, true 
and due obedience, fidelity, and allegiance which every subject of right 
ought to bear towards our said present sovereign lord the king ; also 



xxvhl. INTRODUCTION. 

devising (and as much as in them lay) most wickedly and traitrously 
intending to change and subvert the rule and government of this kingdom 
. . . and also to put and bring our said present sovereign lord and king 
to death and destruction, and to raise and exalt the person pretended to 
be Prince of Wales during the life of the late king James the second of 
England to the crown and royal state and dignity of king, and to the 
imperial rule and government of this kingdom." 

The judges were Sir William Lee, Knight, Chief Justice ; 
Sir John Wills, Chief Justice of Court of Common Pleas; Sir 
Martin Wright, Knight; Sir James Reynolds, Knight; Sir 
Thomas Abney ; Sir Thomas Burnett ; Charles Clarke, Esq. ; 
Edward Clive, Esq.; Sir Thomas de Veil; and Peter Theobald, 
Esq. After several sittings the Court was adjourned until the 
1 5th July, 1746, when its proceedings were resumed. The 
counsel for the king were Sir Dudley Ryder, Attorney General ; 
Sir John Strange ; the Solicitor General, Hon. W. Murray, 
afterwards Lord Mansfield ; Sir Richard Lloyd ; and Mr. Yorke. 

The first of the English Jacobites to be arraigned was 
Francis Townley, a Roman Catholic gentleman of good family, 
who behaved with conspicuous zeal in defence of Carlisle as 
colonel of the Manchester Regiment. There can be no doubt 
that had he been the governor the place would have held out to 
the very last, for when acquainted with the terms of capitulation 
he "flew into a great passion with Colonel Hamilton, declaring 
that it was better to die by the sword than fall into the hands of 
those damned Hanovarians." He had acquired great experience 
in military affairs while in the French army a circumstance 
used to his disadvantage when he claimed to be a French officer 
under commission. Among those to give evidence against him 
was a man named Maddox, of very bad character, so his defence 
was principally directed towards rendering this witness's evidence 
untrustworthy. 






INTRODUCTION. XXIX. 

Although there has always been a suspicion, there does not 
seem proof, that in the matter of the capitulation of Carlisle the 
Duke of Cumberland had acted dishonourably. Yet when 
Townley, found guilty of treason, had been executed, a pamphlet 
was issued containing verses entitled " Townley's Ghost" one 
of the many apparitions supposed to have appeared to Cumber- 
land, upbraiding him for his breach of faith : 

" Awake, infernal wretch ; he cried, 

And view this mangled shade 
That on thy perjured faith relied 
And basely was betrayed." 

George Fletcher met the same fate as Townley, notwith- 
standing the defence that he had been forced out. He was a 
respectable tradesman in Salford, of about 28 years of age. 
Before his death he confessed that his mother had offered him 
1000 to keep clear of the Jacobites. Macgrowther was a more 
fortunate prisoner, and his experience was unique. By every 
means in their power the authorities seemed determined to place 
the noose round his neck ; to prevent his escape on any grounds 
of misnomer he was designated "Alexander McGrowther the 
elder, otherwise called Robinson, otherwise Robeison, otherwise 
Robertson ; gentleman, otherwise farmer, otherwise yeoman." 
We learn from his trial something of the manner in which the 
Jacobite lairds compelled their tenantry to buckle on their clay- 
mores on behalf of the Stuarts, and, these circumstances being 
considered, Macgrowther was only sentenced to banishment. 
Becoming too ill to be removed, he lingered in prison until the 
authorities forgot his existence. Influential friends then inter- 
vened, he received a remission on nth December, 1749, and 
passed the closing years of his long life in the neighbourhood of 
Glenartney, regaling his friends with true hospitality, and telling 
with glee stories of his experience in the '15 and '45, especially 
how he escaped being sent to the plantations. 



XXX. INTRODUCTION. 

Henry Kerr of Gredden was one of the most able of the 
officers of Charles ; he behaved with gallantry on every occasion, 
and luckily he escaped the fate of many of his companions-in- 
arms, owing to the representations of influential people on his 
behalf. The Duke of Roxburgh pleaded for his reprieve in the 
letter given below, the result being that he was ordered to 
remain for a time in the custody of the Prussian Ambassador: 

" Berwick, July iQth, 1746. 

" My Lord As the trials of the Scotch rebels are so near I am under 
the necessity of troubling your Grace by letter to intreat your good offices 
with his Majesty to obtain his most gracious pardon for Mr. Henry Kerr 
of Gredden, a gentleman related to my Family, whom I am heartily 
sorry to find in the number of those mad and unfortunate people engaged 
in the late detestable rebellion. As his crime will not admit it I will not 
excuse or extenuate his guilt. But as I am confident that his Majesty's 
inclination is always to show mercy I will venture to mention to your 
Grace one circumstance that may perhaps render him not altogether 
unworthy of it. He had the misfortune to lose his father when he was 
a child, and was brought up a Roman Catholic by his mother, who sent 
him early into the Spanish service, where he continued twenty years 
Captain, and has never resided at home until within these ten years, when 
he quitted that service. 

" If his Majesty should think fit to pardon him I should look upon it 
as a signal mark of his favour to me, and much wish that it could be 
obtained before his trial, in order to preserve his small estate to him, 
which if done 1 think I may venture to answer for him that he will ever 
after think his life a debt to his Majesty to be laid down for his service if 
ever there should be occasion for it. If your Grace shall move in his 
favour I shall always retain a grateful sense of it. I am shortly to be in 
town. I hope soon to have the honour of waiting upon your Grace. 

" I am, 
" Your Grace's most obedient, and most humble servant, 

" ROXBURGH." 



INTRODUCTION. XXXI. 

Charles Gordon, Maclauchlan, Cameron, and Burnet, like 
others in their defence, proved the measures adopted to recruit 
the Jacobite ranks, while the case of James Stormonth was happily 
extremely rare, for, notwithstanding the compulsion used, in the 
field of battle the men as a whole acted with spirit and credit to 
themselves. Stormonth seems to have been a "queer man" 
before his marriage with the heiress of Pitscandly. He was a 
son of Stormonth of Kinclune. On I2th February, 1747, he 
wrote a long letter to his father from South wark, wherein he 
mentions his daily expectation of release, as he was not a "very 
atrocious offender." He acknowledged he was condemned to 
die in a way and manner which would cause no reflection on his 
relatives. In this letter he gave instructions for the settlement 
of his affairs ; and it is more than apparent that his family life 
was singularly unhappy. He declared it was needless to descend 
into reflections as to what brings about this violent death, "for 
as I could not have family peace I was run to this extreme to 
procure bread." His wife, Elizabeth Farquhar of Pitscandly, 
was able to retain her own estate ; her sister, who exerted 
herself to the utmost on Stormonth's behalf, was married to a 
nephew of the Duke of Argyll, which explains how the latter 
came to interest himself in the fate of Lord Ogilvie's cowardly 
officer. 

Then there was Charles Oliphant, dressed in the uniform of 
Lord John Drummond's officers short blue coat, red-laced 
waistcoat, and bonnet with white cockade who was pressed 
into the service or "else be hanged." Mackenzie of Corrie 
pleaded that he was the victim of obedience to his master, Lord 
Cromartie, a local tyrant, being the latter's factor ; but, notwith- 
standing his ingenuous defence, his letters prove that he was a 
Jacobite of "ardent and zealous feelings." Of Law the parson's 
principles there can be no question, for the clergy of his persuasion 
acted unflinchingly according to their convictions. 



XXX11. INTRODUCTION. 

How differently the brother of the Earl of Dunmore met his 
fate as compared with the resolution of many of inferior rank ! 
The case of William Murray of Taymont illustrates how far 
influence succeeded when placed in the scales against justice. 
He surrendered himself a prisoner towards the close of April, 
being of course confined in the Tower. A true bill was returned 
against him, and the other prisoners at St. Margaret's Hill, on 
23rd August, 1746; the following letter shows that he had 
evidently been already pardoned, for his brother only tried to 
secure some alleviation of his condition while in confinement 
pending his discharge : 

" My Lord Upon being acquainted with his Majesty's pleasure that 
my brother should be removed from the Tower to the Castle of Carris- 
brook, in the Isle of Wight, I gave directions to enquire about the 
accommodation he would have there, and I am informed by Col. Auckland, 
Captain of that Castle, that there is no sort of accommodation there, but 
what he possesses. I must therefore beg your Grace to renew my former 
request to His Majesty that my brother be removed to the Town of 
Newport, under such restrictions as shall be thought proper. I only beg 
leave to observe that considering the condition annexed to his pardon, 
there can be no suspicion of his exceeding the bounds prescribed to him. 

" I am with great respect, 
" Your Grace's most obedient and most humble servant, 

" DUNMORE." 
" Hanover Square, ist Sept., 1747." 

He was soon afterwards discharged ; became 3rd Earl of 
Dunmore on the death of his brother, and by his marriage with 
Catherine, daughter of Lord Nairn, he carried on the line of 
the family. 

John, Lord Macleod, took part in the rising under circum- 
stances similar to that of the Master of Lovat, and the career 
of both is curiously alike. On 23rd September, 1745, Forbes 
of Culloden wrote to the Earl of Cromartie desiring to know 



INTRODUCTION. xxxiii. 

whether his son would accept of a captain's commission. 
Cromartie replied " that he could not help thinking the circum- 
stances in that commission so singular that he could not desire 
him, nor was it Macleod's own inclination to accept it." There 
can be no question that Lovat's intrigues were acquiring a 
distinct influence over Cromartie, and on i;th October that 
wily chief wrote one of his usual highly-strained letters, assuring 
the Earl, "and the worthy Countess, his dear Lord Macleod, 
and dear Lady Betty and all the rest of the charming family of 
his sincerest respects and best wishes." He informed the Earl 
that his son "has a vast respect for the family of Cromartie, and 
loves Lord Macleod, as he loves himself, and was much vexed 
that he did not see him." 

Whatever reasons Cromartie had for pique at the Government 
of the day, he marched southwards early in November with his 
men, accompanied by his son, Lord Macleod, whose exploits 
are here recorded, and who was taken on the eve of Culloden 
at the castle of Dunrobin in Sutherland. Macleod, in his 
narrative of the campaign printed in Frascr s Earls of Cromartie, 
tells how on one occasion he went to Dunblane; his men, thinking 
he had returned home, marched out of Perth, and notwithstanding 
all the efforts of their officers declined to return for a considerable 
time. In fact he says: "The only way one can keep these 
troops to their colours is by flattery and good words, and even 
winking at many disorders which would never have been allowed 
in a regular army," and he therefore resolved to pretend ignorance 
of what passed in his absence. He was brought to London, 
where a true bill was found against him on 1 3th August, 1 746. 
His own feelings are conclusively shown at his trial, on 2Oth 
December following, when he tendered a plea of guilty, and 
addressing the Court, in words pathetic in their frankness, said : 

" My Lords, I stand indicted for one of the most heinous of all crimes, 
that of rebellion and treason against one of the best of kings, and my 

5 



XXXIV. INTRODUCTION. 

only rightful Lord and sovereign. Would to God, my Lords, I could not 
plead guilty to the charge ! But as I cannot, I beg leave to assure your 
Lordships my heart never was consenting to the unnatural and wicked 
part I then acted. Remember, my Lords, my youth, and that I am in 
that state of life when an unhappy father's example is almost a law. 
But my heart is full from the deep sense I have of his miseries and my 
own ; and I shall only add as I must and do plead guilty to the charge, 
if, on your Lordships' kind representation of my case, his Majesty shall 
think fit, in his great goodness, to extend his compassion to me, what of 
future life and fortune I may ever have shall be entirely devoted to the 
service of His Majesty, on whose mercy I now absolutely throw myself." 

He received a free pardon, but on condition that he conveyed 
to the Crown on attaining his majority all right and title to the 
Cromartic Estates, and with this he complied. He entered the 
service of Sweden, where he attained distinction, being A.D.C. 
to the king, who created him Count Cromartie. After his return 
to this country he raised the /3rd Highlanders, at whose head 
he rendered distinguished service in India. He was created 
Major General, and was further rewarded by the restoration of 
his ancestral property. 

We cannot enter into details in regard to Alexander 
Buchanan, or of 'the more fortunate Nicholas Glascoe, who, 
happily for himself, was able to satisfy the authorities that 
he was a " St. Germain's Bird." And what scenes can be 
conjured up in the attempts of Rattray of Ranguillan to escape 
from the service of the Prince, and evade the clutches of his 
overlord, the "high-minded Moray, the exiled, the dear" of Sir 
Walter Scott ! The supreme moment too when the love of the 
gardener's wife for her husband was put to severe test, and the 
upward jerking of her finger revealed the hiding place of Tulli- 
barcline's recalcitrant vassal, whose treatment was surely of a 
stringent order. 

Colin Mackenzie's witnesses throw light upon Cromartie's 
proceedings in Caithness and the north, but a more important 



INTRODUCTION. XXXV. 

prisoner was that patriotic Scot, Charles Kinloch brother of 
Sir James Kinloch. A true bill was found against him and his 
brother, Alexander, on 23rd August, and on 2nd September they 
were arraigned. They advanced a plea of not guilty, and under 
the Act of Union challenged the jurisdiction of the Court, 
claiming to be tried before the High Court of Justiciary in 
Scotland. The arguments by which their counsel sought to 
establish their contention were ultimately over-ruled, and Charles 
was found guilty and sentenced as in the text. 

It was Thomas Chaddoch, or Chadwick, who contributed 
greatly to the amusement of the Jacobite officers. A cultured 
musician, he could play on several instruments, and was a boon 
companion as well, but a man of most daring resolution. During 
his confinement he always took the lead in trying to amuse and 
cheer his companions. On the morning of his execution, whilst 
at breakfast with his companion, Berwick (p. 446), he declared 
that although his time drew near he was as hearty as ever he 
had been in his life, nor was he sorry for what he had done, for 
if it was to do again he would act in the same manner. 

Siddal, the Manchester barber, was a Jacobite through 
hereditary instinct. His father, also Thomas, took a prominent 
part in a Jacobite riot at Manchester on loth June, 1715, and 
was executed therefor at Manchester on nth February, 1716. 
In the dying speech of Thomas, the younger, "he praised God 
that it was permitted him to follow the pious example of his 
father. It was not from necessity he had joined the Prince, nor 
did he want an addition of riches to increase his happiness, for 
he was blessed with an excellent, faithful, and religious wife and 
five children. He owed it to God, his king and country to serve 
the Prince, in regard to whose character he challenged his keenest 
enemies to impute to him any vice ; his only fault was an 
ill-timed humanity." Siddal, like others, against whom Samuel 
Maddox gave evidence, accused the latter of gross perjury. He 



XXXVI. INTRODUCTION. 

forgave the pretended Duke of Cumberland for his dishonourable 
and unsoldierly conduct in putting them to death in violation of 
the laws of nations after a written capitulation to the contrary. 
The clergyman who attended upon him and his friends wrote 
that from " the time of their condemnation, a decent cheerfulness 
constantly appeared in their countenances and behaviour, and I 
believe it may be truly said that no men ever suffered in a 
righteous cause with greater magnanimity and more Christian 
fortitude, for the appearance and near approach of a violent 
death, armed with the utmost terror of pain and torments, made 
no impression of dread upon their minds. In a word great is 
the honour they have clone the Church, the king, yourself and 
themselves." 

Another to meet his doom with dauntless demeanour was 
the " mighty gay " Dawson. As a youth attending St. John's 
College, Cambridge, he ran away and joined the Jacobites at 
Manchester, proving himself a most active partisan. In the 
Scots Magazine will be found an account of his farewell to his 
father. When brought to prison, after being condemned, while 
the officials were putting him in irons, he declared that should 
they put a ton weight upon him it would not in the least affect 
his resolution. There is, however, a tragic element connected 
with his death, commemorated in the plaintive ballad, "Jemmy 
Dawson." When, on the morning of 3Oth July, Townley, 
Morgan, Deacon, Dawson, Berwick, Fletcher, Chadwick, Siddal, 
and Blood wended their way in sledges to Kennington Common, 
there followed the melancholy procession the lady who had given 
her heart and hand to the subject of this note. The victims of 
the executioner were treated in accordance with the barbarous 
usage of the time, and when the heart of her lover had been 
thrown into the fire, she suddenly fell back dead in her coach. 

Thomas Deacon, who was executed on the same day, was a 
son of Dr. Thomas Deacon of Manchester. Two of his brothers 



INTRODUCTION. xxxvii. 

were concerned ; one, Robert, died at Kendal, and the other, 
Charles, was reprieved. Deacon, in his speech, declared his 
happiness in having an opportunity of dying in so just and 
glorious a cause (Appendix, p. 615). His brother, Charles, was 
compelled to witness his execution, and it is said that when his 
head was stuck upon Manchester Exchange his father was one 
of the first to see it, and, saluting it, thanked " God he had a 
son who could die for his lawful Prince." Such was the spirit 
of some of the Jacobites ! 

David Morgan, one of the prisoners executed on 3Oth July, 
was fifty-one years of age. He was bred to the Bar, but had an 
indifferent practice, for, possessed of considerable private means, 
his haughty and reserved manners did not render him popular, 
nor indeed was his profession in the least congenial to his taste. 
Although known as the Prince's Counsellor, he declared that he 
had been taken prisoner when paying a visit at Etherton Hall, 
in Cheshire, and detained by force, but he could not deny his 
presence with the rebels at many places, and produced evidence 
to prove that he attempted to escape. He said that, by the law 
of England, every man had a right to be tried by his neighbours 
of same state and condition as himself, but, "God, help me, I 
am deprived of that benefit, and I am now amongst strangers who 
know nothing of me." He had served the Crown of England 
in two campaigns with some reputation. His defence was 
listened to with attention, but the Solicitor-General in reply 
accused him of only attempting to escape when the rebels' 
affairs were desperate, and when his own safety and preservation 
rendered it imperative. The jury took a similar view, so he 
received sentence of death. At their execution the prisoners 
were "allowed neither priest nor parson," which led to a 
distressing scene when Morgan, carefully adjusting his spectacles, 
read out in a calm voice, to his fellow-prisoners, the prayers 
appropriate to the burial service. Like the others, he prepared 



XXXVlll. INTRODUCTION. 

a speech wherein, with remarkable inconsistency in view of his 
defence, he entered into an historical account of the reasons 
which induced him to engage in the enterprise, and he gloried 
in having had the privilege of seeing the young Prince, with 
whom he compared the Duke of Cumberland, of course greatly 
to the latter's disadvantage. Nor did his judges escape scathe- 
less. He reproached them with stupid and inveterate zeal, 
denounced the infamous Maddox, and impugned the veracity of 
Captain Vere. His was a case where the best laid "schemes o' 
mice and men, gang aft agley," and his proud boast that, " in 
spite of King George and all the people in the world, he would 
revisit Derby," was vain, for his head was placed on a spike at 
Temple Bar, a grewsome spectacle to all beholders. 

Sir John Wedderburn was indicted for high treason, especially 
with levying the Excise for the Jacobites. The usual defence 
of being forced was made ; and, if any credence be given to the 
witnesses on his behalf, the case seems clear. Sir John was son 
of Sir Alexander Wedderburn, of an Aberdeenshire family of 
repute. Sir Alexander had suffered much for his revolutionary 
principles, and to compensate him the Government made him a 
Receiver of Excise. He was, however, of facile disposition, 
and on his death the estates were so heavily encumbered that 
they had to be sold. Sir John, on taking up the succession, was 
obliged to occupy a small farm, where he lived in a house with 
a thatched roof and clay floors ; and struggled desperately to 
maintain himself, his wife, and his nine children. When taken 
prisoner by the Jacobites he was compelled to act as Receiver 
of Excise. The receipts he had granted on these occasions 
were unfortunately used to his disadvantage, for an English jury 
with these before them credited his witnesses with a humane 
desire to save his life. 

Sir James Kinloch and the laird of Monaltrie had the good 
fortune to escape the fate of their comrades. The country by 



INTRODUCTION. XXXl'x. 

this time had become horrified at the proofs advanced of the 
terrible vengeance taken by the Duke of Cumberland, in 
murdering so many in cold blood. Even the king felt that the 
execution of more men would create a hostile spirit generally 
throughout the land ; and so, for the future, the executioner's 
hand was stayed, for there were many still awaiting their doom. 
A few of those who acted a double part, especially Lord Lovat, 
suffered death, but to deal with them is beyond our province 
here. 

The throne had been shaken in a terrible manner, and a 
troublous time had been passed ; but now the power of the 
Jacobites was shattered, and the bloody scenes recently witnessed 
were not without effect. It must be apparent from these papers 
that there were many men who " wadna fecht for Charlie ;" few 
indeed were those who died for love of the cause ; more perished 
through the tyranny of their masters. It must not be forgotten 
that much still remains to be made public ere one can truly 
realise the story of the '45. Yet this is certain, the one who 
came through the fiery ordeal with most credit was the Prince 
who led such an army, and performed such gallant deeds at the 
head of men whose hearts were not in the enterprise. It was 
the personal charm of " Bonnie Prince Charlie," as well as terror 
of their chiefs, which made deserters, and men prone to desertion, 
fight as never men fought. 

In concluding these notes the writer cannot but sincerely 
regret that they were penned at intervals during a long and 
serious illness, when suffering constant pain ; and he would have 
much preferred that one more able to deal with the subject had 
taken it up, yet he hopes this imperfect (for such he feels it to 
be) attempt to throw fresh light on a most interesting period will 
be received with that sympathy which overlooks errors not 
intentional. 



xl. INTRODUCTION. 

Paper XXXI. contains petitions from two locally well-known 
men of the time, and belonging to families of long standing 
it is from Lord Forbes' Collection. The petitions are introduced 
as specimens of the many which poured in upon the Government 
after the rising of '45 was over. The writers of these petitions 
held totally opposite principles Forbes of Echt, a Hanoverian, 
was the son of a man known as "a bigot presbyterian," while 
young Hay of Rannes had been "out" with Charles Edward. 

Papers XXXII. to XXXVI. are from Lord Sempill's 
Collection. They refer to the condition of the country after the 
battle of Culloden had shattered the hopes of Charles Edward, 
and of his devoted adherents, and to proposals made for opening 
up the country and bringing it into a state of peace. 

Although the enthusiasm which existed in the highlands so 
long as Prince Charlie was at the head of his followers had 
received its death blow, there was still a great deal of unrest in 
the country. There was a lingering hope that the Prince would 
return some time or other, and that "the king would get his ain 
again," and there were a great many of those who had joined 
in the rising, and were disaffected to the Government, either in 
concealment or moving about from place to place. They had 
retained or concealed their arms, and the influence they had 
over their followers was still unbroken. 

After Culloden the highlanders of course dispersed to their 
native glens ; as has been already described, they had, from 
ancient times, been accustomed to plundering, and naturally 
returned to their old habits. The country above the plains, and 
indeed in many other places, was quite unsafe, and the authorities, 
after the experiences of the '45, saw how necessary it was that 
proper steps should be taken to watch the Highlanders, that 
depredations might cease that there should be no chance of 
their gathering together again and that, as soon as possible, the 



INTRODUCTION. xli. 

country should be opened up by roads, as had been commenced 
by General Wade. 

To carry out these measures various proposals were made, 
as will be found described in these papers. One of the places 
in the north-east of Scotland considered to be most suitable as 
the head-quarters of a body of troops was the village of Tarland 
in Aberdeenshire. Paper XXXII. is a report from Lieut.-Col. 
Watson to Major-General Blakeney, describing the arrangements 
that had been made to carry out certain suggestions, and the 
results so far, up to 8th August, 1747, and at pp. 306-309, Vol. I., 
will be found letters from Col. Watson to Lieut. Forbes, who 
commanded at Tarland, highly commending that officer for the 
manner in which he had carried out the important duty entrusted 
to him. The scheme would appear to have been General 
Blakeney's, as the next paper, No. XXXIII., a Memorial anent 
thieving, &c., shows. It is unfortunate that this document, from 
amongst the collection at Fintray House, does not give the 
name of its author. 

Papers XXXIV. and XXXV. give descriptions of the Glens 
and. Passes in the Highlands in the county of Aberdeen and 
bordering shires, and show the routes by which it was believed 
the thieves generally drove their plunder, and which it would be 
necessary to guard by detachments of troops, if the depredations 
were to be put a stop to. 

Paper XXXVI. shows the places fixed upon as the posts for 
the troops necessary for the above purposes. 

In connection with the foregoing subject attention may be 
drawn here to Paper No. XL., in Appendix, also from Lord 
Sempill's Collection. 

Paper XXXVII. "The Highland Reports "I am in- 
debted to General Sir John Forbes of Inverernan, K. C. B., 
for these reports. A collateral ancester of Sir John Forbes 
held an important post in the army in the north of Scotland 



xlii. INTRODUCTION. 

after the rising of '45 was over, and while measures were being 
taken to bring the country into a state of peace and order, and 
copies of the despatches from the several Highland posts had 
been retained by this officer, and are in Sir John Forbes's 
possession. These reports show that the suggestions above 
described, as to the locating of troops, had been given effect to, 
and the detached parties remained at the posts indicated for a 
very considerable time. 

Although these reports often refer to matters of routine, and 
are perhaps sometimes rather commonplace and wanting in 
exciting interest, they furnish a very complete record of the 
work that fell to the officers and men so employed, and show 
how the measures adopted to pacify the country were being 
carried out. The warlike element in the highlands remained 
for long, and a great deal of arduous and trying work had to be 
gone through to bring the country into a settled condition, as a 
perusal of these reports will show. The period embraced is one 
to which comparatively little attention has, it is believed, been 
paid, but it was not an unimportant one, and it took many years 
of careful supervision and watching before the desired object 
was attained. 

INTRODUCTION TO APPENDIX. 

Paper XXXVIII. 

When the ist vol. of these Papers was issued, a suggestion 
was thrown out that if the Aberdeen University Records 
contained any entries relating to the risings of '15 or '45, it 
would be of interest to have them included in the volume which 
was to follow. 

Acting on this suggestion, I applied for the requisite per- 
mission to have the records of King's and Marischal Colleges 
examined. This was at once most courteously given, and Mr. 
Robert S. Rait, who takes great interest in the subject, was kind 



INTRODUCTION. xliii. 

enough to have the entries relating to the rising of '15 in King's 
College Records extracted for insertion in these Papers. Mr. 
Rait has at my request written a short introduction, which I 
have added below. There are no entries as regards the rising 
of '45 in King's College Records, nor of either of the risings in 
the papers belonging to Marischal College, as stated by Mr. 
Rait : 

/. Kings College. 

The Session 1715-16 seems to have been considerably 
disturbed at King's College. The Principal, Dr. George 
Middleton, two of the regents, James Urquhart and Richard 
Gordon, and the civilist, John Gordon, were all on the side of 
the House of Stuart, and those of the students whose sympathies 
were enlisted in the same cause took advantage of the Jacobite 
proclivities of their seniors to give evidence of their own zeal in 
the matter. The story of the student riots, so far as we know it, 
possesses purely an incidental interest. Only a few students 
were concerned in the disturbances. The minutes and list of 
entrants for the year 1715 are wanting, and the curtain is not 
drawn on the little drama till the 25th April, 1716. On that 
day the Senatus met to deliberate on the various cases of 
discipline. The Principal and his three colleagues, who had 
been involved in the rising, did not judge it prudent to put in 
an appearance, Principal Middleton excusing himself on the 
ground that he was " necessarly detained." 

From the depositions of the various witnesses who were 
examined by the Senatus it may be gathered that, on some day 
in December, 1715, or January, 1716, four students Robert 
Warrander, Kenneth McKenzie, William Ord, and James Gatt 
had summoned a meeting in the public school, and had 
delivered with boyish enthusiasm speeches in behalf of King 
James. It is evident from the minutes that, whatever was 



xliv. INTRODUCTION. 

lacking in the speeches of the youthful rebels, there was no 
failure to appreciate the force of the weapon of ridicule in 
dealing with King George and his generals. The same students, 
in company with some others, had also whether on the same 
occasion or not made a raid upon the manse of Old Aberdeen 
and the house of an Alexander Taylor, and had done con- 
siderable damage. The minister and Taylor were, doubtless, 
prominent Whigs. 

Some weeks after the meeting in the public school, rioting 
again broke out. " On the first Thursday of February," Robert 
Warrander, William Moir, Patrick and John Ogilvie, Angus 
Sage, Kenneth McKenzie, and William Ord, forced the sacrist 
and porter to ring the college bells, and compelled the Old Town 
drummer to march with them, playing his drum, to the college 
gate, where King James VI 1 1. was proclaimed with all honours. 
A bonfire was lit and a picture, " which they called the Duke of 
Brunswick," was committed to the flames. Such is the course 
of events as described in the minutes. 

The difficulty in fixing the date of the meeting in the public 
school, and the whole tone of the proceedings, would lead to the 
inference that there was a complete cessation of college discipline 
during the winter of 1715-16. The presence of the students, 
however, and especially the fact that James Gatt, who came from 
Cullen, is mentioned, shows that collegiate residence was not 
discontinued. The Senatus rusticated sine die all the students 
concerned, and devoted a portion of their bursaries to repaying 
the injured householders for the damages done them. One of 
the students, James Gatt, was afterwards permitted to return. 
He graduated in 1718, and became finally minister of Gretna 
Green, and the author of some Latin poetry, preserved in MS. 
Some information regarding Gatt, and a specimen of his poetry, 
will be found in Scottish Notes and Queries, Vol. IX. The 
sacrist, John Hay, was dismissed. 



INTRODUCTION. xlv. 

Upon the suppression of the rising, the Government 
appointed a Commission to visit the Universities of Aberdeen. 
It met in Edinburgh in 1717. The records of this Commission 
have, unfortunately, not been traced. The College possessed a 
copy, which, as we know from a Senatus Minute of 1763, was 
at that time accessible to all the members. A reference occurs 
again in 1786, when Principal John Chalmers was accused of 
destroying this copy. All that we know, then, is the bare fact 
that the Commissioners deposed the Principal, the civilist, and 
the two regents. The new Principal, George Chalmers, produced 
his presentation in the Senatus on the 22nd November, 1717, 
when Dr. Middleton appeared and protested. When the two 
new regents, John Ker and Daniel Bradfut, were admitted, 
their predecessors also protested. The minutes speak of these 
protestations as being " subjoyned " ; but this, unfortunately, is 
not the case. Considerable difficulty was experienced in obtaining 
access to the rooms of the dispossessed officials, who took this 
method of showing their indignation at the treatment which they 
had received from Government. 

The King's College Minutes contain no reference to the 
political situation of the year 1745, beyond that, in 1746, it was 
resolved "to pursue William Moir of Lonmay for the cess and 
levy money which he exacted from the College for the service of 
the Rebels." 

2. Marischal College. 

The attitude of Marischal College towards the rising of 1715 
was determined by the fact that its Chancellor, the tenth Earl 
Marischal, and his brother, afterwards the famous Marshal 
Keith, were prominent leaders of the Jacobite movement. 
During Sessions 1715-16 and 1716-17 the doors of the college 
were closed, and there is no record of the transaction of any 
college business for a considerable period. A result of this is 



xlvi. INTRODUCTION. 

probably seen in the fact that, on the ;th May, 1716, some 
Marischal College students asked, and received, permission from 
the authorities of King's College to finish their course, and 
graduate in that University. 

The deposition of the Chancellor of the University was 
involved in the forfeiture of the Marischal title, and the Com- 
mission of 1717 dismissed all the other officials who had shared 
the political sympathies of the Earl Marischal. The Principal, 
Robert Paterson, had died in the interval. His successor was 
Thomas Blackwell, who had been appointed Professor of Divinity 
in 1711, and who alone had remained loyal to the Act of Settle- 
ment. His colleagues, George Liddel, Professor of Mathematics; 
Patrick Chalmers, Professor of Medicine ; and George Peacock, 
Alexander Moir, William Smith, and William Meston, regents, 
were all deposed. Meston had been tutor to the Earl and his 
brother, and was afterwards the author of "The Knight," "Old 
Mother Grim's Tales," and some Latin poetry. Such patronage 
of chairs as had belonged to the Earl Marischal was assumed 
by Government. 

We have no evidence regarding the behaviour of the students 
of Marischal College during the Rebellion. The excitement of 
1714 had evidently unsettled them, for we find, from the Aberdeen 
Town Council Minutes of 8th January and i7th May, 1715, that 
" the students of both Colledges Did in a most insolent and 
tumultuous maner, Insult the magistrates to the highest Degree." 
The motive may have been political, as the Town Council was 
at that moment strongly Hanoverian. 

The minutes of Marischal College are silent regarding the 
Rebellion of 1 745. 

Paper XXXIX., a Declaration by James III., dated at 
Lucca in 1722, has been sent me by James Bruce, Esq., W.S., 
Edinburgh. It will be read with interest, as it is addressed not 



INTRODUCTION. xlvii. 

only to the writer's own " subjects," of the three nations of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland, but to all sovereign princes, as 
a foundation for a lasting peace in Europe. 

Paper XL. has been referred to above, see p. xli. 

Papers XLI. and XLI I. are from the Collections of the late 
Mr. Thomson of Banchory, now belonging to the Free Church 
College Library, Aberdeen. The former gives the speeches 
attributed to Prince Charles Edward and Sir John Cope to their 
respective armies previous to the battle of Prestonpans. The 
latter is an account, printed at Edinburgh on 25th April, 1746, 
of the battle of Culloden, with a list of the prisoners at Inverness 
on the i gth April, three days after the battle. 

Paper XLI 1 1. is the dying declaration of Thomas Theodore 
Deacon, the particulars of whose trial will be found at p. 446. 
The original document was found amongst a number of old 
papers that had been made over to me some years ago, and 
furnishes the fullest confirmation of the particulars referred to 
by Mr. Murray Rose in his Introductory Notes (see p. xxxvi. of 
Introduction). 

Papers XLIV. and XLV., which conclude the collection, 
have been sent me by Mr. Murray Rose. The former contains 
two petitions to the Secretary of State by Patrick Stewart and 
Robert Maxwell, who had been pressed to enlist in the " East 
India Independent Companies " after they had been released from 
prison at Carlisle. Both petitioners remonstrate strongly against 
the injustice of being forced to enlist against their wishes. The 
petitions indicate the pressure used to induce men at that time 
to enlist for Indian service. The latter (XLV.) is a petition 
from James Farquharson of Balmoral, who states that he had 
been induced by his elder brother, " whom he regarded as a 
parent, to enter the late Rebellion." The paper is so far 
remarkable that it contains a recommendation in favour of the 
petitioner, signed by the whole of the members of the Presbytery 



xlviii. INTRODUCTION. 

of Alford ; the reasons why the Royal clemency should be ex- 
tended to the petitioner may be of interest. A similar document 
was signed by the whole of the ministers of the Kincardine 
O'Neil Presbytery, within whose bounds the petitioner's estate 
of Balmoral lay. The result of the various representations to the 
King's Most Excellent Majesty does not appear. Farquharson 
was of the Invereye family ; was severely wounded at the battle 
of Falkirk in January, 1746, and had to be conveyed home ; he 
was not again in arms. 

In submitting the remainder of these Historical Papers to 
the Club, the Editor begs to offer his best thanks to all who 
have assisted him. To Mr. Murray Rose, whose very interesting 
contribution has been specially referred to at p. ix. of the Intro- 
duction ; to Sir John Forbes, K.C.B., of Inverernan, for the 
Highland Reports; and for the papers which appear in the 
Appendix, to the following Mr. Robert S. Rait, who made 
the extracts from the Records of King's College ; Mr. James 
Bruce, W.S., through whom the likeness of Princess Louisa 
was obtained, for copy of the Declaration by James III.; and 
the Rev. Dr. Salmond, for the papers from the Library of 
the Free Church College ; also to the Rev. Dr. Cooper and the 
Rev. J. G. Michie, for the aid they have so kindly given. 

The Editor begs specially to acknowledge the trouble taken 
by Messrs. G. W. Wilson & Co. in producing the illustrations, 
and to repeat his best thanks to Mr. P. J. Anderson for his kind 
assistance in the issue of the present volume. 

In conclusion, the Editor feels that he cannot omit from 
his acknowledgments the name of his daughter, Miss Mabel 
D. Allardyce, whose help in the laborious work of transcribing 
many of the papers which had been selected, and in preparing 
a very full Index, has been of the greatest assistance. 

J. A. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. II. 

PAGE 

XXX. Depositions against Jacobites, and Depositions at Jacobite 

Trials, 1746 ... ... 339 

XXXI. Memorials for Thomas Forbess of Echt, and Andrew 

Hay, younger of Rannes, 1746 ... ... ... 487 

XXXII. Concerning Highland Depredations, 1747 ... ... 490 

XXXIII. Memorial anent Thieving and Depredations in the 

Highlands, 1747 ... ... ... ... 500 

XXXIV. Description of the Road from Avimore to Aberdeen, 

1747 504 

XXXV. Description of the Hills, Glens and Passes in the 

Counties of Aberdeen, &c., 1747 ... ... 506 

XXXVI. Proposals for Cantoning the Five Highland Additional 

Company's in remoter parts of the Highlands, 1747, 509 

XXXVII. Highland Reports, I749-5O ... 5 "3 

APPENDIX. 

XXXVIII. Extracts from King's College Records, 1716 ... 5^5 
XXXIX. Declaration by James III., 1722 ... ... ... 597 

XL. Memorial concerning a Cross Road from Inverlochy through 

Braemar to Aberdeen ... ... ... ... 600 

XLI. Speeches by Prince Charles and Sir John Cope, 1745 ... 607 

XLII. Account of the Battle of Culloden, 1746 ... ... 608 

XLI II. Declaration of Thomas Theodore Deacon, 1746 ... 615 

XLIV. Petitions by Patrick Stewart and Robert Maxwell, 1746-7. 6l 7 

XLV. Petition by Farquharson of Balmoral, 1748 ... ... 620 



ILLUSTRATIONS TO VOL. II. 

(These have been prepared by Messrs. G. W. Wilson &" Co., Aberdeen.) 

\. LOUISA MARIA Princesse de la Grande Bretagne. A Paris 
chcz 1'Autcur rue du Four Faubourg St. Germain altenant 
la porte de la Foire. Painted by A. S. Belle. From print 
in Scottish National Portrait Gallery, by permission of 
Alex. W. Inglis, Esq., Secretary of Board of Manufactures. 
(For an account of Princess Louisa, see Miss Strickland's 
" Princesses of the House of Stuart ") ... ... Frontispiece. 

I'ACE 

2. THE DUCHESS OF PERTH (Lady Jean Gordon), daughter of 

ist Duke of Gordon mother of the Duke of Perth and 
Lord John Drummond. From a copy by C. P. Harding 
after the original portrait at Drummond Castle by F. Van 
Vast, ijn ... ... ... ... ... ...to face 339 

3. LORD PITSLIGO. Painted by A. S. Belle in Paris, 1720. From 

the portrait in the possession of The Hon. C. Forbes Trefusis 

at Fettercairn ... ... ... ... ... ...to face 341 

4. THE DUKE OF PERTH. From a drawing after the original at 

Drummond Castle ... ... ... ... ... to face 347 

5. LORD JOHN DRUMMOND. From a drawing after the original 

at Drummond Castle by D. Dupre', Rome, 1739 ...to face 351 

6. " GLENBUCKET'S BANNER." Photograph of the Banner carried 

by " old Glenbucket" in 77/5 and 174.5, now in the possession 

of a descendant of " Gordon of Glenbucket" ... to face 353 



ILLUSTRATIONS. U. 



7. CORGARFF CASTLE, Aberdeenshire. From a photograph by ' AGE 
Messrs. G. W. Wilson & Co. to face 529 

"This has originally been a simple oblong tower, to which various additions 
have within comparatively recent times been made, giving it an imposing and 
strongly fortified aspect. The castle stands on a height amongst the uplands 
of the head streams of the river Don, an inaccessible and dreary country. 
Tradition states that it was built by one of the Earls of Mar as a hunting-seat. 
It afterwards belonged to the Forbeses,* and was destroyed in 1581 during 
their feuds with the Gordons. Indeed this castle disputes with Towie the 
uneviable distinction of having been the scene of Adam Gordon of Auchen- 
doun's horrid tragedy. 

" Two solitary corbals remain to indicate where the parapet walls originally 
was. 

"In 1746 the Government purchased the castle from Forbes of Skellater, 
and kept fifteen to twenty men stationed in it. 

" This would form an outpost from Mar Castle, one of the principal garrisons 
for keeping the Highlanders in order. At the above date extensive alterations 
were made upon it to suit it for its purpose. 

" An enclosing wall was run round the whole, provided with salients for 
the defence of the flanks, and well loop-holed, in the same manner as the 
enclosing wall at Mar Castle. 

"This is perhaps the most interesting point about this lonely castle, which 
thus, along with a few others, brings the history of fortified houses in Scotland 
down to so recent a date as the middle of the last century." From The 
Castellated and Domestic Architecture of Scotland, by Macgibbon & A'oss. 

8. CAROLUS PRINCEPS WALLLE ac Peint par L. Toque' 1748 

et Grave par J. G. Will en la mcme anne. From an 
engraving in the possession of the Earl of Erroll . . . 606 

9. HENRY BENEDICT STUART Cardinal York. From the portrait 

by L. A. Blandiet in the possession of the Earl of Moray ... 606 

10. JAMES MOIR OF STONEYWOOD. From the portrait in the 
possession of Miss Skene. (Commanded his regiment at 
Culloden) to face 608 

* (The Forbeses of Towie Ed.) 




DUCHESS OF PERTH. 



DEPOSITION; 



Lieut. CHA>. 
October was frequ 
and highland dres: 

C. What did 



JOHN GRA.- As to .-V 

him drun!: in the sirct-t.-' ! 
I never saw him act oth.-rw i 

JAMES LOUIE. I saw a 
last, called Eail of Kcllic. I 
in with the rebels. I saw h 
called Earl of Kclluv He hi 



XXX. 

DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

THE EARL OF KELLIE. 

Lieut. CHAS. CAMPBELL. The Earl of Kellie in September or 
October was frequently seen in Edinburgh with his broadsword, cockade, 
and highland dress. He dined with the Pretender's son. 

Q. What did the white cockade signify ? 

Ans. We thought every man who wore it had joined the rebels. I 
never saw the Earl of Kellie march with any body of men. 

WM. HASTIE (Surgeon). Alexander, Earl of Kellie : I saw a person 
so called at Edinburgh, but not in the rebel army. He did not come 
into England. He was at Edinburgh in the ordinary dress, but with a 
white cockade. I did not see him do any hostile act. I don't know that 
any wear cockades but rebels. Upon recollection I saw some surgeons, 
who were forced out of Edinburgh, wear white cockades. None else that 
I saw wore white cockades. I never saw him with the rebels, nor in 
arms. 

Q. In what company ? 

Ans. I saw him frequently with gentlemen in the highland dress. 

JOHN GRAY. As to Alexander, Earl of Kellie, last Christmas I saw 
him drunk in the streets of Perth, a great many highland-men by him. 
I never saw him act otherwise than being drunk again. 

JAMES LOGIE. I saw a man in the streets of Aberdeen, in February 
last, called Earl of Kellie. I saw him with a sword by his side. He came 
in with the rebels. I saw him come into Aberdeen. He was generally 
called Earl of Kellie> He had no command so far as I know. He did not 



340 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

appear at the head of any body of men. I never heard he was an idiot. 
I never heard him called Earl of Kellie in his own hearing. He came in 
with the rest of the gentlemen with about 2000 foot, and 600 horse 
deemed rebels drums beating, colours flying, and bagpipes playing. He 
was not in highland dress. He had a small sword. I never saw any 
but rebels wear white cockades, nor any that I know for protection. 
I have seen him three or four days. I did not see him march out 
of Aberdeen with the rebels, but it was the common notion that he 
marched out with them. 

Q. Have you not heard that some were forced in that service ? 

Ans. I have heard that some private men were forced by Lord 
Lewis Gordon. He appeared between 50 and 60 [years of age]. I am 
not very certain that I should know him again. 

Q. Was he given to drinking ? 

Ans. I have heard so. I can't say how far he was disordered by 
drink. 

WILLIAM, VISCOUNT OF STRATHALLAN. 

JOHN HlCKSON (Vintner in Perth). Viscount Strathallan : I saw 
him attending the young Pretender at my house in same manner as the 
Duke of Perth and Lord George Murray did. He was the only man of 
them not in highland clothes. He dined and supped often with the 
young Pretender. I did not sec him do any hostile act, or at the head of 
any body of rebels, but I saw him in the street when bodies were in 
motion. I have not heard that he was made Governor of Perth. I did 
not see him after the battle of Prestonpans. I can't remember seeing 
him go out of Perth. It was early in the morning, and they were in a 
hurry. 

Q. By what appellation did he call the Pretender's son ? 

Ans. He called him " His Highness." I did not observe that he had 
a white cockade. Sometimes the word " Royal " was before " Highness." 

JOHN BARCLAY. I never saw him before the rebellion. I never 
saw him but at Perth, and then I saw him act as Governor of Perth. I 
saw him among the rebels there among a guard of 200 deemed rebels. 
I saw him on foot with a small sword by his side. He was generally 










LORD PITSLIGO. 



AT. 

esteemed Governor of Perth under the Pretr.; 

Aberdeen batt.-.lron deemeci rebels. 

Q. Was he Governor of Perth on the Kinj 
Ans.l was not there the* He was 

Lord Strathallan. 



Lieut CHAS. CAMPBELL 
the rebellion, but in Octob 
man) at the head of f 
a body of horse calk 
cockade and his sword dr.w > 
?red to it I saw him < 
to be Lord Pitsligo. I saw 
lie is an elderly man abort n 

JOHN VEKE. Lord r-ts: : . 
I saw him first at Ashburn. 

not know him before, \ 
He was drank to by that 

:rally called so. 



DAVID < 

Lieut. CHAS. CAMPBELL 
<awhim come into Edinbi i J 
'.iber, and November ,ast 1 
Colonel of the 1'retcridr 
Jy in highland clothes 

JOHN VERB. Lord Elcho . 

;aw him first at Maccle*fiei<!. 

;he road to Carlisle. I 

\s drew up the reyii 

K. Lord Elcht 
igh as an officer of the 
with the rebels, it hjeii 



fro 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 34! 

esteemed Governor of Perth under the Pretender. He commanded the 
Aberdeen battalion deemed rebels. 

Q. Was he Governor of Perth on the King's birthday, the 3oth Oct. ? 

Ans. I was not there then. He was generally understood to be 
Lord Strathallan. 

LORD PITSLIGO. 

Lieut. CHAS. CAMPBELL. I did not know Lord Pitsligo before 
the rebellion, but in October and November I saw him (he is an 
old man) at the head of his men, drawn up along with the Life 
Guards, a body of horse called Lord Pitsligo's Horse. He had a white 
cockade and his sword drawn. I heard him called by that name, and he 
answered to it I saw him several times, and he was generally understood 
to be Lord Pitsligo. I saw him several times before as one of the rebels. 
He is an elderly man about my size. 

JOHN VERE. Lord Pitsligo : He was Colonel of a Regiment of Horse. 
I saw him first at Ashburn. He marched as part of the rebel army. I 
did not know him before, but he was called Lord Pitsligo before me. 
He was drank to by that name and answered to that name, and was 
generally called so. 

DAVID WEMYSS, LORD ELCHO. 

Lieut. CHAS. CAMPBELL. David, Lord Elcho : I knew him before. I 
saw him come into Edinburgh on the Pretender's left hand. In September, 
October, and November last I saw him exercise his Life Guards, and he 
was Colonel of the Pretender's eldest son's Life Guards. I saw him 
frequently in highland clothes. 

JOHN VERE. Lord Elcho : I had known him before the rebellion. 
I saw him first at Macclesfield, then at Leek, then at Derby, and after 
that on the road to Carlisle. I marched with his regiment he at the 
head of it ; he drew up the regiment. 

WM. HASTIE. Lord Elcho : I knew him before. I saw him at 
Edinburgh as an officer of the rebels. He marched into England, and 
returned with the rebels, it being from November to February. 






342 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

HUGH DOUGLAS. I was Lord Elcho's servant I went with the 
rebels from Edinburgh to Derby, and back again to Perth. I came from 
Edinburgh with the rebels, when all the rest came, last winter. 



JAMES DRUMMOND, ELDEST SON OF VISCOUNT STRATHALLAN. 

JOHN VERE. James Drummond, heir apparent of Lord Strath- 
allan : He was A.D.C. to the Pretender. I saw him at Macclesfield and 
other places in December last. I saw him armed with a broadsword and 
pistols. I saw him go with the Pretender, and give orders to come and 
help to mend the axletree of the money cart. He marched with the 
rebels. I did not know him before. He was generally called the Master 
of Strathallan, and answered to the name. 

WM. HASTIE. James Drummond, eldest son of Viscount Strath- 
allan : I saw a person (so called and understood) in a highland dress, and 
in arms with a broadsword and pistols in the Pretender's son's army. 
He had a command, and was generally on horseback. He rode along 
with the Pretender's son out of Edinburgh, in November, with a great 
number of rebels. I saw him in England, all the way in the Pretender's 
son's army, in December last. He went about as an officer. I was 
along with them in the army from the first of November to February, 
and saw him all that time. 

JAMES LOGIE. I have seen a man called Master of Strathallan. I 
take him to be Lord Strathallan's eldest son. I never knew him before. 
He was in February last at Aberdeen, in the highland dress, in the High 
Street. I never heard him say or do anything. He had the highland 
habit, and wore the white cockade and a broadsword. I did not see him 
at the head of any body of men. I saw him speaking with several 
gents, who were rebels. I never saw him give any orders. I knew 
only that he wore the highland habit. The men, I think, were one day 
drawn up. I did not see him there. Lord Strathallan's horse were 
quartered, I heard, a little out of Aberdeen. It was a common report 
that the Master of Strathallan was quartered in the Old Town of 
Aberdeen. The men drawn up were foot all but some of Lord 
Balmerino's horse. They were drawn up, as I was told, to receive their 
pay. All men had swords, some had firelocks. Most of the foot had 
bayonets when they marched. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 343 

SIMON FRASER, ELDEST SON OF SIMON, LORD LOVAT. 

WM. HASTIE. Simon Fraser, eldest son and heir apparent of Simon, 
Lord Lovat : I saw him in the rebellion. I heard him generally called 
Master of Lovat. I saw him in the latter end of January at St. Ninian's. 
He joined the Pretender's army with the Frasers, being 2 or 300 in arms, 
and marched with the rebels. 

JOHN GRAY. Simon Fraser, eldest son of Lord Lovat : I saw a 
person called Master of Lovat at Perth, in the street, in highland clothes, 
with a dirk by his side. He belonged to the Frasers, and they belonged 
to the Pretender, as I suppose. This was at Christmas. I had a 
conversation with him about my liberty, which he obtained. I under- 
stood he was at the head of the Frasers, and came to serve the Pretender. 

GEORGE HAY. As to Simon Fraser, I saw him near Stirling in 
January last in a room, not with any body of men. One Captain 
Fitzgerald was prisoner under the Master of Lovat's care, and was kept 
prisoner for the Pretender. The Master of Lovat did not talk of him as 
his prisoner. It was the Master of Lovat's room, and he appeared as an 
officer for the Pretender. I never saw him but in that room. He sat in 
the room with the prisoner, whom I never heard say he was the Master 
of Lovat's prisoner. My master told me that Fitzgerald was prisoner to 
Master of Lovat. My master was used as surgeon for the rebels. I 
marched with them all the way to Derby. 



GEORGE MURRAY, ESQ., CALLED LORD GEORGE MURRAY, BROTHER TO 
JAMES, DUKE OF ATIIOLE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Lord George Murray was at Edinburgh in the 
months of September and October, 1745. Lord George Murray was 
very often seen in arms with his broadsword and pistols, giving directions 
in Holyrood House, and particularly one night was going up with a 
design (as was said) to make an attack upon the Castle. The directions 
appeared to be military directions on the part of the rebels. 

JOHN HlCKSON (Vintner in Perth). Lord George Murray : I saw 
him come into my house when the Pretender was there in September 



344 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

last, and he was very often with the Pretender's son. I did not see him 
in arms, but in the highland dress. I believe he had a broadsword and 
cockade, but I don't positively remember. I did not see him on a march, 
but in company with some officers. I saw him in company with the 
Pretender's son, with whom he dined and supped very often. He was 
treated by the rebel officers as a General Officer. I saw him after the 
battle of Prestonpans. I knew him many years before. He is brother 
to the Duke of Athole. 

JOHN VERE. Lord George Murray : I saw him at the same time in 
arms as a highland man, with a broadsword. I saw him at the head of 
the rebel army from the 2nd or 3rd to the 2Oth. He was Major or 
General, and had a regiment of his own. 

WILLIAM HASTIE. Lord George Murray : I saw the person so 
called marching in arms with the rebels. He generally went at the head 
of them. 



LEWIS GORDON, ESQ., COMMONLY CALLED LORD LEWIS GORDON, 
BROTHER TO COSMO GEORGE, DUKE OF GORDON. 

JOHN GRAY. As to Lord Lewis Gordon, I know him now. I saw a 
company of men, who said they were at his command. I was brought 
prisoner by them before him. He asked my business. I was released 
upon a promise I should make no discovery. I took Lord Lewis 
Gordon to be in the service of the Pretender. 

Q. Did they take you prisoner as a person not in the Pretender's 
interest ? 

Ans. Yes. They did not swear me that I would not discover 
anything, but I gave an obligation that I would not be in arms against 
the Pretender for six months. Lord Lewis Gordon required this 
obligation. Lord Lewis Gordon called the Pretender " King," and his 
son the Prince of Wales. He was generally reputed to be Lord Lewis 
Gordon, and he styled himself so. The words of the obligation " I 
oblige myself not to carry arms against King James the 8th or the 
Prince of Wales for six months," addressed to Lord Lewis Gordon, 
Lord Lieutenant of Banff and Aberdeen, and Lord Lewis Gordon 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 345 

attested a copy of the obligation. He gave order for levying the cess, 
as I heard, for the men in arms for the Pretender. 

JAMES LOGIE. Lord Lewis Gordon : I knew him before by sight. 
I saw him 2 or 3 months together at Aberdeen in Oct., Nov., Dec., and 
January last. He was called Governor of Aberdeen, Lord Lieutenant 
of Banffshire and Aberdeenshire for the Pretender's son. I saw him 
frequently. He had possession of the Town House, and was frequently 
with armed men, about 150 or 130, sometimes 200, sometimes 400, who 
were deemed rebels. I saw these men come in and go out. He went in 
and out only with his servants. Excise money (as was the general 
notion) was collected by his men. Lord Lewis Gordon sent a party of 
his men to the Custom House officers to demand the keys (as I was 
informed), and to me they said they came from the Governor of 
Aberdeen. They called him Governor, but I think they meant the 
Deputy-Governor, Wm. Moir, and I saw the Collector deliver the keys. 
I never demanded any money, nor received after this. The merchants 
told me they paid to persons appointed by Lord Lewis Gordon. He 
kept possession of the Custom House. He then said they came from 
Lonmay, the Deputy-Governor. It was the common reputation that 
the customs were paid to persons appointed by Lord Lewis Gordon. 
They threatened the Collector with imprisonment if he refused the keys, 
and said they would carry him to the Governor. I never saw Lord 
Lewis Gordon with the armed men who came for the keys, but I saw 
him with the officers, one of whom demanded the keys. I have told the 
merchants they must be obliged to pay the money over again. 

The Deputy-Governor was deemed deputy to Lord Lewis Gordon 
for the Pretender. No Governor of Aberdeen was appointed by the 
King. 

Q. Was a Collector of Customs appointed by Lord Lewis Gordon ? 

Ans. Wm. Hutton. I heard so. Wm. Moir was always called 
Governor, and was the acting Governor. I believe he did not do 
anything without Lord Lewis Gordon's knowledge. He was in town all 
the while Lord Lewis Gordon was in town. He was appointed Deputy 
Governor, as I heard, by Lord Lewis Gordon. He is, I know, Duke of 
Gordon's brother. 

U I 



346 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JAMES DRUMMOND TAKING UPON HIMSELF THE TITLE OF 
DUKE OF PERTH. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. (He acquainted the House what persons he 
had seen in the present rebellion.) Being asked by Mr. Speaker, 
he said : James, Duke of Perth, came with the Pretender's son 
into Edinburgh, on his right hand. David, Lord Elcho, was on the 
Pretender's left hand. There were a great many with them in arms. 
Donald Cameron of Lochiel was there ; Lord Pitsligo headed a party of 
Horse with Graham, Lord Dundee. Alexander Macdonald of Keppoch 
was with his regiment in Edinburgh ; saw him frequently there. Gordon 
of Glenbucket was seen both at Edinburgh and near Carlisle. Lord 
Ogilvie was seen within three miles of Carlisle. Charles Stewart of 
Ardshiel was at Edinburgh. The Earl of Kellie was seen at the same 
time, also Alexander MacDonald of Glencoc. William Fydler, belonging 
to the Exchequer, was seen at Edinburgh in a highland dress, also two 
sons of Rollo of Row House. The eldest son of James Graham, the Earl 
of Airth ; James, Duke of Perth (his surname is Drummond) rode into 
Edinburgh on the Pretender's son's right hand, and I saw him dine with 
the Pretender's son, and in arms several times in Edinburgh, giving 
directions to the rebels. 

JOHN HlCKSON. I saw James Drummond, Duke of Perth, in 
Perth in September, 1745, attending on the young Pretender. He 
walked, dined, and supped with him. He had highland clothes, white 
cockade, and broadsword. I believe he had a command ; I did not see 
him do any hostile act. There was none done in that place ; I saw him 
among the people, whom I took to be military men, in Perth. I did not 
see him give military directions. The Duke of Perth was in company 
with Sullivan, Kellie, and Sir J. MacDonald, who were reputed rebels, 
and this in my house. I saw the Duke of Perth with a highland dress 
and broadsword. I did not see the ceremony of proclaiming the 
Pretender. The young Pretender came downstairs, asked for Sullivan, 
and pulled him out of bed. The Duke of Perth came frequently to the 
Pretender's son and Sullivan. 

Q. Did you know the Duke of Perth before ? 

Ans. Yes, a great many years before. 




DUKE OF PERTH. 



)S1TIONS AGAIN >T J.H 

Q. Did you see him afterwards at Kduiot 
r. Yes, I saw the Duke of Perth inn 
army which fought the battle of Prestonpans. 
and so had the rest. A whiU rockaoe wa.s th< 

Q. Did you know any favur obtained b 
prisoners ? 

Ans. He came into the [>* L,\ 
to him and Lord Nairn (>. 
believed the Duke of Perth . 
Lord Nairn told me th.it ' 
against it. The Duke of ' 
point of it. The Frrr -' 
detained till all ^hnnM h 

Q. What time iva 
Perth and Edinburgh ? 

Ans. I saw him >vh< 

battle of I'restonpaiiv 

proposed ? 

Ans.- I cannot toll ; i 

Q. How came you t > 

Ans. At the do -in. 
who was in Sir John d : . 

(2. Were the pris 

Ans. I camf fr^m }-. -. 

Q. Did not some ; 
tection ? 

Ans. I cannot SKV. or 
it was said so. 

(Beipg asked whctuci lu. 
cause, he was directed u. vi 
the question was improper 

Q. When did you go ir- r.i 

Ans. Tuesday evening. 

Q. Did you send Lady Muiny . 

Ans. She came to Edinburgh 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 347 

Q. Did you see him afterwards at Edinburgh ? 

Ans. Yes, I saw the Duke of Perth marching with the highland 
army which fought the battle of Prestonpans. He had a white cockade, 
and so had the rest. A white cockade was the distinguishing mark. 

Q. Did you know any favour obtained by the Duke of Perth for the 
prisoners ? 

Ans, He came into the place where the prisoners were, and I spoke 
to him and Lord Nairn out of regard to several officers, because I 
believed the Duke of Perth had power to do it. The Duke of Perth and 
Lord Nairn told me that Mr. Sullivan and the foreign officers were 
against it. The Duke of Perth and Lord Nairn said they would make a 
point of it. The French officers proposed that the prisoners should be 
detained till all should be settled. 

Q. What time was there between the seeing the Duke of Perth at 
Perth and Edinburgh ? 

Ans. I saw him when he left Perth in Sept., and in Edinburgh the 
day the prisoners were brought there. It was the Monday after the 
battle of Prestonpans. 

Q. Did the Duke of Perth and Lord Nairn obtain what they 
proposed ? 

Ans. I cannot tell ; I left Edinburgh the day after. 

Q. How came you to go to Edinburgh ? 

Ans. At the desire of Lady Murray to inquire after her husband, 
who was in Sir John Cope's army. 

Q. Were the prisoners at Perth when you were there ? 

Ans. I came from England the Tuesday after the battle. 

Q. Did not some people at Perth wear white cockades for pro- 
tection ? 

Ans. I cannot say, being confined at my house, nor clo I remember 
it was said so. 

(Being asked whether he was not himself engaged in the Pretender's 
cause, he was directed to withdraw. The opinion of the House was that 
the question was improper. He was called in again.) 

Q. When did you go from Edinburgh ? 

Ans. Tuesday evening. 

Q. Did you send Lady Murray any word ? 

Ans. She came to Edinburgh on Monday, and I saw her husband. 



348 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JOHN VERB. I was in the army. As to the Duke of Perth, I saw 
him at Macclesfield, 3rd Dec. I was examined by him, when I was 
taken. I had seen him before in London. They asked me several 
questions. What number of troops the Duke had ? I told him about 
12,000. They then asked me as to the number of each regiment, and 
the number of regiments at Newcastle. Duke of Perth asked me as to 
the grounds about Newcastle, the artillery, and other questions. The 
Pretender's son came in and asked me why I was his enemy. I saw him 
in arms, he had a black cap, a Turkish scimitar, and he was St. Gent. 
(sic), at least they called him so. He was with the rebels. They all had 
white cockades. 

WILLIAM HASTIE. The Duke of Perth, so called, I saw him 
frequently along with the rebels in highland dress. I heard him called 
Duke of Perth as he was passing by. I saw him among the rebels as 
they marched. 

JAMES GRAHAM OF DUNTROON TAKING ON HIMSELF THE TITLE OF 

VISCOUNT DUNDEE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. James Graham, called Viscount Dundee: 
In October and November he was at the head of the Life Guards 
belonging to the Pretender's son. He commanded a company of 
those Guards. He is a low fat man, and is squint-eyed. 

JOHN VERE. Lord Dundee : At Leek I saw him and heard him 
called Lord Dundee, and he was generally so called. On 6th Dec. 
he was at Leek, and was Captain in the troops of Horse Guards 
belonging to the Pretender. I saw him on the march with the rebel 
army. 

HUGH DOUGLAS. James Graham of Duntroon, called Lord Viscount 
Dundee : I know Lord Dundee. I first saw him at Edinburgh whilst the 
rebels were there, before they marched out of Edinburgh ; he was always 
called Lord Dundee. He went to Derby with the rebel army and back 
again. He commanded a troop of the young Pretender's Life Guards. 
I saw him every day at the head of the troop, marching as a rebel with 
the rebels. He was Captain of the troops this winter. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 349 



JOHN NAIRN, LORD NAIRN. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. In September and October last 1 saw the man, 
called Lord Nairn, once or twice about the Holyrood House ; but I 
never saw him before. He had a white cockade, but was not in highland 
dress. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Lord Nairn : I saw him in Perth the first night of 
September, with Cameron of Lochiel. He took possession of my 
house, and likewise of the town. He was in a highland dress. I 
did not see him do any act of hostility in Perth, but I saw him on the 
march at the head of the King's officers. He commanded the Guards, 
who had the care of the prisoners. This was the Lord whom I applied 
to for favour to the prisoners in the Canongate. There was a guard in 
the town appointed by the Magistrates, but possession was after taken, as 
was understood, for the Pretender's son. He is John Nairn. I knew 
him many years before. 

Q. -How soon did the Pretender's son come to the house ? 

Ans. Two days after as I believe. 

JOHN VERE. Lord Nairn : He is Colonel of a Regiment of Foot, 
and acted as Brigadier on the march of the rebels from Macclesfield 
to Derby. The young Pretender gave orders to Lord Nairn to line 
the hedges the iSth December. I saw him every day on the march ; he 
marched with the rebels. 

WM. HASTIE. I saw Lord Nairn all the way with the rebels ; he 
was generally called Lord Nairn, and was among the rebels on the 
march, as an officer, from November to February. 



DAVID, LORD OCilLVIE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Lord Ogilvie : On the loth November I saw 
him march at the head of 200 men near Carlisle. I saw him frequently 
at Edinburgh in the same month, and he was called Lord Ogilvie. The 
men he headed were in arms for the Pretender. 



35 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JOHN HlCKSON. David Ogilvie, commonly called Lord Ogilvie : 
I have known him several years. He was a schoolboy in Perth. 
He came up stairs in my house next day after the Pretender's 
son came, and asked for the Pretender, whom he called the Prince 
Regent. I never saw him in arms. He was in the lowland dress. I 
don't remember that he had a cockade. He went back to his own 
county to fetch his men, for the Pretender, as was said. I heard him say 
he was going home, and hoped in a few days he should bring his men 
with him. I did not see him above twice with the Pretender's son. He 
asked for the Pretender's son by the name of " Prince Regent." He 
called the Pretender's son in my hearing " Royal Highness." 

JOHN VERB. Lord Ogilvie : I never knew him before I saw him 
with the rebels ; but he was called Lord Ogilvie in my hearing, and 
generally so called. I saw him in arms near the young Pretender, in 
the rebel army, with his own regiment. 

WM. HASTIE. Lord Ogilvie: I knew him before; he was along 
with the rebels, as an officer, in arms from November to February. 



JOHN DRUMMOND TAKING ON HIMSELF TITLE OF LORD JOHN 

DRUMMOND. 

JOHN GRAY. I saw Lord John Drummond at Perth in highland 
clothes, but not giving directions to the rebels. I was 1 6 days a 
prisoner at Perth. I saw him at Stirling in highland dress walking the 
streets. I was taken by Lord Lewis Gordon's men. I saw Lord John 
Drummond at Aberdeen riding with 500 horses. 

Q. Do you know of any Declaration published by Lord John 
Drummond at Aberdeen ? 

Ans. No. 

JAMES BARCLAY. I saw Lord John Drummond at Stirling in 
Jan. last. I never saw him before. He was generally understood to 
be Lord John Drummond. He commanded the Irish Brigade in the 




LORD JOHN DRUMMOND. 



' TIONS AGAINST ' V ( 

ice. He acted as General of the 
marched at the head of that Brigade in Jan 
rally called the Duke of Perth's brother 
man, between 40 and 50, with .1 -lark-brown ( 
about 40, but I cannot be posit He ; with 

Q. Should you be able to/ 
I c people? 

Ans. I don't know but th.it 

HUGH DOUGLAS. i 
not acquainted with him, 
rebels were there. He was 
Perth. He was called '. > ' 
this winter. I saw him a:;i iv 
Brigade. I saw him in;-r-h , ; 
beating sometimes. I dii' 
am not 16 rears old ; 1 



my house in Septembi.'i 
supper. He. and they 
highland clothts. 
cockades, but I d^: t rent. 
before 

JOHN VKRE. !<<.; 
Chongcton, or Coti^irt 
Nairn, and he wu< ii'-.i!'-i 
arms marching with the '< 

Captain READ. His na.i 

I saw him in arms at ! 
a broadsword. I have dinti! v;:h hi 
patty are deemed reix-ls. I di 
marched about the middle o! Octob 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 351 

French service. He acted as General of the King of France's forces. 
He marched at the head of that Brigade in January into Stirling. He is 
generally called the Duke of Perth's brother. He is a pretty tall, jolly 
man, between 40 and 50, with a dark-brown complexion. I think he is 
about 40, but I cannot be positive. He is neither fat nor lean. 

Q. Should you be able to distinguish him in a room where there are 
too people ? 

Ans. I don't know but that I might, but I am not very positive. 

HUGH DOUGLAS. I don't know Lord John Drummond. I am 
not acquainted with him, but I have seen him at Perth when the 
rebels were there. He was called Lord John Drummond generally at 
Perth. He was called Duke of Perth's brother at that time and place, 
this winter. I saw him among the rebels. He commanded the Irish 
Brigade. I saw him march with them from Stirling to Perth ; drums 
beating sometimes. I did not know him before I saw him at Perth. I 
am not 16 years old ; I was 15 the hindmost day of last February. 



ROBERT MERCER, ALIAS NAIRN OF ALDIE. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Robert Mercer of Aldie : I saw him often at 
my house in September last with the Pretender's son at dinner and 
supper. He. and they all called him " Royal Highness." He was in 
highland clothes. I never saw him in arms ; I believe they all had 
cockades, but I don't remember particular persons. I have known him 
before. 

JOHN VERE. Robert Mercer, alias Nairn : I saw him first at 
Chongcton, or Congleton, the 4th Dec. last. They called him Major 
Nairn, and he was understood to be Lord Nairn's brother. I saw him in 
arms marching with the rebels. 

Captain READ. His name is Nairn. I have known him for the same 
time. I saw him in arms at Perth in October with a white cockade and 
a broadsword. I have dined with him at the table of the Duke of Athole. 
His party are deemed rebels. I did not see him march out ; the party 
marched about the middle of October. 




352 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

SIR WILLIAM GORDON OF PARK. 

JOHN VERE. Sir William Gordon of Park: I knew him first 
at Manchester ; he was called by that name. He was generally 
understood to be that person. I saw him in arms, at Manchester, at 
the head of his regiment in the rebel army. He is Lieut-Col, to a 
regiment. 

W.M. HASTIE. Sir W. Gordon of Park : I did not know him before 
the rebellion. I saw him first in England in Dec. last, among the rebels, 
at the head of a body of men. He was generally called Sir Wm. 
Gordon of Park. 

JOHN GRAY. Sir Wm. Gordon of Park : I saw a person so called in 
January last. I did not see him do any act of hostility. I saw him go 
to the prisoners. He had a sort of highland clothes. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Sir Wm. Gordon of Park : I know him, but not 
before the rebellion. I saw him at Glasgow and at Stirling in January 
last. He was generally understood to be Sir William Gordon of Park. 
He acted as Lieut.-Col. of Lord Ogilvie's Regiment, and I saw him 
march at the head of his men. I saw him another time on the march of 
the rebels, between October and January. That regiment was in the 
Pretender's service. 

Q. Did not you see these persons in some action ? 

A /is. No, I was at Carlisle when it was besieged. I was with one 
John Roy Stewart. I never saw him in any battle. 

JOHN MURRAY OF HROUGHTON. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. John Murray of Broughton was frequently 
seen about Holyrood House. I saw him with a sword and a white 
cockade. He is commonly reputed to be the Pretender's son's 
secretary. I frequently saw him in the month of October. The last 
time I saw him he was in a scarlet dress and a white cockade. He is a 
well-looking, little man, of a fair complexion. I heard people say he 
was the Pretender's son's secretary. I don't remember whether he had a 
highland dress or a broadsword. 




GLENBUCKETS BANNER. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST 

JOHN HlCKSON. John Murray of 
him till he came to my house. He act 
Pretender. I applied to him myself fV'i 
signed by him. I never ,aw him i 
sword on. I never saw L>:' 
him go in and out of ih- ;> in wlvi 
passes were signed by Mr. 
the seal. The seal v. a* .ff: 
the S.TPI.' as the Ki'r' 



He 

saw 

saw 

with 



fvjrgh in October with 

saw him march in a hi 

he commanded about . 

Vwie but rebels wear uli 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 353 

JOHN HlCKSON. John Murray of Broughton : I never knew 
him till he came to my house. He acted as secretary to the young 
Pretender. I applied to him myself for passes, and obtained them 
signed by him. I never saw him in arms, but as a gentleman with a 
sword on. I never saw him dine or sup with the Pretender, but I saw 
him go in and out of the room where the Pretender's son was. Those 
passes were signed by Mr. Murray and not by the Pretender. He had 
the seal. The seal was affixed to every pass it was the arms of Britain, 
the same as the King's arms. 

JOHN VERE. John Murray of Broughton : I saw him at Macclesficld. 
He was called Broughton. I saw him at the Council table ; he acted as 
secretary to the young Pretender. He asked me many questions. I 
saw him act as secretary in giving passports, and signing passports. I 
saw him write his name to a protection in the house where the Pretender's 
son was. He lay in the same house; he generally went in a chair, but 
with the rebel army. He acted as secretary at the Council Board. 

WM. HASTIE. John Murray of Broughton : I knew him before I 
saw him march from Scotland to England, and back again with the rebel 
army, from November to February. He went along with the Pretender, 
and marched with the rebel army. 

JAMES BARCLAY. John Murray of Broughton : I have seen him at 
Edinburgh before the present rebellion. I knew him by sight, though I 
am not acquainted with him. I saw him several times in arms. I never 
saw him do any act of office, but I saw him on the march with the rebels 
as a rebel. They went from Edinburgh in November, and returned to 
Glasgow in January. 



JOHN GORDON, ELDER OF GLENBUCKET. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. John Gordon : I saw him frequently at Edin- 
burgh in October with the rebels in a highland dress and pistols. 
I saw him march in a hostile manner at their head. On November loth 
he commanded about 200 of Duke of Gordon's people at Redcliffe. 
None but rebels wear white cockades. He is an old man much crouched. 

V I 



354 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JOHN VERB. John Gordon : He went by the name of Glenbucket, 
and answered to that name. He rode on a little gray highland beast. 
He marched with the rebel army between Manchester and Wigan in 
December last. 

WM. HASTIE. John Gordon : I saw a man generally so called in 
arms in England at the head of a body of men as part of the rebel 
army. I saw him at the time, from November to February. I knew 
him before the rebellion. 

JOHN GRAY. John Gordon : He was called General Gordon of 

Glenbucket. I had seen him before. He was commissioner of [ ] 

for the Pretender at the time of the battle of Falkirk in January last. I 
have known him 8 years before ; he is a very old man. 

JAMES BARCLAY. John Gordon : I know him, but I never saw him 
before the rebellion. I saw him act as General, and he was called 
General Gordon. I saw him march with the rebels from Edinburgh into 
England, and back again to Glasgow, all the way. He is not very tall, 
but a very old man, and lies forward. He had a white cockade. 



DONALD CAMERON, YOUNGER OF LOCHIEL. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. I was some years personally acquainted with 
him before the rebellion. When I saw him at Edinburgh (which 
was in September or October) he marched oftener than once at the 
head of the Camerons in a highland dress, and I knew him immediately 
at first sight. He was very active in giving directions to the Camerons. 
I saw him march at the head of his regiment. He went with the 
Camerons (the rebels) at the blockade of the Castle. The Camerons 
were in arms for the Pretender, and wore white cockades. 

JOHN HlCKSON. I know Cameron of Lochiel, but don't know 
whether he hath a father or not. He with Lord Nairn took possession 
of my house and the town of Perth in September. He is a middle-aged 
man. The Provost told me it was needless to guard the town, for they 
would burn it if there was opposition. They marched in and placed 
sentinels in all the posts. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 355 

JOHN VERE. Donald Cameron of Lochiel : He was called by that 
name and answered to it. He was one of the Council who examined 
me 3rd Dec. last. He was Major-General of the clans. I saw him then 
in arms at the head of the Camerons with the rebel army. 

WM. HASTIE. Donald Cameron of Lochiel : I did not know him 
before the rebellion. I saw him in it. He was generally called Col. 
Cameron the younger of Lochiel. He acted as an officer upon the rebel 
march into England and back again. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Donald Cameron of Lochiel : I knew him, but 
not before the rebellion. I have seen him several times since at 
Edinburgh, and on the march, between November and January. He 
was chief of his own clan, and in the march went always at their head, 
being always called Cameron of Lochiel. 

DR. ARCHIBALD CAMERON, BROTHER OF DONALD CAMERON OF LOCHIEL. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Dr. Archibald Cameron : I saw one who was 
called Dr. Cameron of Lochiel. I did not know him before the rebellion, 
but I have seen him at Edinburgh in October, and in Glasgow in the 
beginning of January last. He appeared as one of the rebels, acted as 
A.D.C. to the Pretender, and marched with the rebels. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Dr. Archibald Cameron : I knew him before 
the rebellion. He was A.D.C. to the young Pretender. I saw him act 
and march all the while with the rebels from October last. I am not 
sure of his Christian name, but have heard him called Archibald. 

LUDOVIC CAMERON, OF TORCASTLE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Ludovic Cameron of Torcastle : I was ac- 
quainted with him at the same time. He is uncle of the younger 
Lochiel. I met him at Edinburgh before the battle of Prestonpans. 
He asked me to join him. " No," said I, "it is not my time yet." He 
pressed me again, and I refused. After the battle of Prestonpans he 
again asked me to join the Pretender's son. I declined. He said he 
was going to look after some of his men who had deserted. I saw him 
with a broadsword and pistol and a white cockade. 



356 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JOHN VERE. I knew an uncle of Lochiel the younger, but I don't 
know his designation. I never heard him called by the name of Tor- 
castle. He was Lieutenant-Col, of the Camerons. 



ALEXANDER CAMERON OF DUNGALLON. 

CIIAS. CAMPBELL. Alexander Cameron of Dungallon : I saw him 
march at the head of the rebel Camerons in arms for the Pretender's 
son. None is called by the name of the seat, but the head of the family. 

WM. HASTIE. Alexander Cameron of Dungallon : I did not know 
him before. He was generally called Cameron of Dungallon. I saw 
him as an officer among the rebels, often marching with the rebel army 
into England and back again, between 1st November and February. I 
don't know that his name is Alexander. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Alexander Cameron of Dungallon : I knew 
Dungallon by that name only. He was called by that name. I saw him 
as one of the rebels upon their march all the time from Edinburgh into 
England and back again in the last winter. 



DONALD MACDONALD OF CLANRONALD, YOUNGER SON OF 
DONALD MACDONALD OF CLANRONALD. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Donald MacDonald the younger of Clanronald : 
I never saw him till in Perth in September last walking the street. 
I understood he was come at the head of his men. It was the 
common report. I did not know him well enough to take much notice 
of him. I don't remember that I saw him then with the Pretender's 
son, nor did I see him afterwards. 

JOHN VERE. Donald MacDonald the younger of Clanronald : 1 saw 
a gentleman who was called Clanronald. He is a young man ; he had a 
brother there who was called Major MacDonald. I don't know of any 
other person called Clanronald. He is about 40 or 42. He was 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 357 

considered as the head of that clan. I saw him in arms at the head of 
his regiment upon the march loth December last, and afterwards as a 
colonel. I saw him go off with the Pretender. He was deemed the chief 
of that family of Clanronald. I cannot say whether this person is the 
younger or the elder. He was called the captain of the clan. 

WM. HASTIE. Donald MacDonald the younger of Clanronald : 
There were two brothers of that name one was always called Clan- 
ronald, and the other Mr. MacDonald. I saw them both then in arms. 
One of them called Clanronald came from Edinburgh into England ; an 
officer in the rebel army as chief of the clan. Mr. MacDonald I saw 
first upon the return to Scotland. I don't know whether he was an 
officer ; both of them marched with the rebel army. Clanronald 
commanded at the head of the clan. I call the commanding officer of 
the clan, when the chief is not there, commander of the clan. 

Q. How do you know he commanded as chief? 

Ans. As the people said. The Stewart Clan was not commanded 
by their chief, and that commanding officer was called colonel. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Donald MacDonald of Clanronald the younger: 
I saw him, but not before the rebellion. I saw him at Edinburgh, and 
he marched out of there with the rebel army in October last. I saw 
him between Carlisle and Penrith marching with the rebel army, 
commanding his own clan. He was generally understood to be 
MacDonald of Clanronald, but I don't know his Christian name, nor 
heard him called the younger. He was generally understood to be 
chief of the clan. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Donald MacDonald of Clanronald the younger: 
I knew him before the rebellion. I saw him upon I3th October at 
Edinburgh, and I saw him upon the march of the rebel army as colonel 
of his own men. He was called younger Clanronald, son of old 
Clanronald, who did not come into the rebellion. Old Clanronald is 
called Ronald. I dont know the eldest son's xtian name ; the younger 
brother's name is Donald MacDonald. He was a major in the rebel 
army, and called the son of Clanronald. He is about 21. They some- 
times, but very seldom, in my country call two brothers by the same 
xtian name. 



358 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 



DONALD MACDONALD OF LOCHGARRIE. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Donald MacDonald of Lochgarrie : I know him, 
but not by that name. I know him by the name of Lochgarrie. 
I don't remember to have seen him in Perth. I saw him when the 
King's officers were brought prisoners into Edinburgh, in September 
last. He spoke to me. He walked the streets in his highland dress. 
He only asked me hew I did. 

<2. Was Lochgarrie among those who brought in the King's officers ? 

Ans. No. 

WM. HASTIE. Donald MacDonald of Lochgarrie : I did not know 
him before the rebellion. He was generally called MacDonald of Loch- 
garrie. He was at the head of the Clan of Glengarrie not as their 
chief, but as their commander. 

JOHN GRAY. Donald MacDonald of Lochgarrie : I saw him at that 
time at Stirling. I knew him before. I saw him go into, and come out 
of Glenbucket's lodging. I don't know his xtian name, but he was called 
MacDonald of Lochgarrie. He had a shoulder belt. He appeared to be 
an officer. I heard he was A.D.C. to the Pretender's son. I have heard 
he had been in Lord Loudoun's Regiment. 

HUGH DOUGLAS. Donald MacDonald of Lochgarrie : I have seen 
Lochgarrie (but not before the rebellion) among the rebels in England 
not very often. He was generally called Lochgarrie. I believe he was 
head of a clan of Lochgarrie men. I have seen him march at the head 
of them, this last winter, at a great many places ; at Carlisle, Penrith, 
and on the road marching, with the rebels. I never heard him called 
Donald MacDonald or MacDonald, but always Lochgarrie. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Donald MacDonald of Lochgarrie : I did not 
know him before the rebellion, but I saw him in October last, among the 
rebels. From October last he was colonel of Glengarrie's men in 
Glengarrie's son's absence, and commanded the men after the battle of 
Prestonpans. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 359 



ARCHIBALD MACDONELL OF KEPPOCH. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Archibald MacDonell of Keppoch : I saw him 
frequently at Edinburgh, in September and October last, at the head 
of his regiment rebels-in-arms for the Pretender's son. I saw him with 
a white cockade. I knew him personally before. 

JOHN VERE. Archibald MacDonell of Keppoch : I saw Keppoch 
in Edinburgh. He marched at the head of his clan. He was called 
Keppoch, answered to the name, and was generally understood to be 
Keppoch. I saw him in arms from Preston to Lancaster with the rebels, 
in December last, as a colonel of his own people. 

WM. HASTIE. Archibald MacDonell of Keppoch : I did not know 
him before the rebellion. He was generally called MacDonell of 
Keppoch. He marched from Edinburgh with the rebel army into 
England and returned back ; he only commanded the clan. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Archibald MacDonell of Keppoch : I did 
not know him before. He was colonel of the regiment where I was. I 
saw him from October last with the rebels at the head of his men. He 
was called Keppoch. I have heard some people so call him. He was 
generally called Colonel MacDonell of Keppoch. 



ARCHIBALD MACDONALD, SON OF COL. MACDONALD OF BARRISDALE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Archibald MacDonald, son of MacDonald 
of Barrisdale the younger : I saw him in October and September 
frequently at Edinburgh, on the part of the rebels. He marched 
at the head of a party of the MacDonalds with a carbine. He 
is 1 8 or 19 years of age. He had a highland dress and a white cockade. 
I never saw him with a sword drawn. I took him to be the commanding 
officer of his party. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Archibald MacDonald, son of MacDonald of 
Barrisdale : I knew him before, and saw him from October last in the 
rebel army as a rebel. He is about 20, and was a lieutenant. His 
Christian name is Archibald. 



360 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 



ALEXANDER MACDONALD OF GLENCOE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Alexander MacDonald of Glencoe : I saw him 
frequently in arms in Edinburgh in September and October. I saw him 
march at the head of his company of rebels. 

JOHN VERE. Alexander MacDonald of Glencoe: He had a regiment. 
1 did not know him before. He was called and answered to the name of 
Glencoe. I saw him in arms with the rebels between Kendal and [ ]. 
He marched with his regiment the i8th December last with the Pretender. 



EWAN MACPIIERSON OF CLUNIE. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Ewan MacPherson of Clunie: I saw him at 
Edinburgh and Radcliffe with 200 MacPhersons, with a carbine, for 
the Pretender's son. I never saw him in any other than a highland 
dress. I was sent from Berwick to that County by Lord Justice Clerk. 
I never knew him till I saw him at Edinburgh. I saw him several times 
there. The same person commonly known by that name. 

JOHN VERE. Ewan MacPherson of Clunie : I knew him because 
5th December I was put under his charge. He was called Clunie 
MacPherson, and answered to that name. I saw him in arms upon the 
march with the rebels in December last. 

WM. HASTIE. Ewan MacPherson of Clunie : I saw him in the rebel 
army. I did not know him before I saw him at Dalkeith from 1st 
November to 1st February. He acted as an officer at the head of his 
clan. It was supposed to be his own clan. He marched into England 
with the rebel army. His clan was part of the rebel army. He was 
called MacPherson of Clunie. His xtian name is Ewan. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Ewan MacPherson of Clunie: I saw his men 
in the rebellion, and I saw a person called Clunie MacPherson at their 
head. He came along with the rebel army into England. 1 saw him in 
October last. 






DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 361 



LAUCHLAN MACLAUCHLAN OF CASTLE LAUCHLAN. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Lauchlan MacLauchlan of Castle Lauchlan : I 
saw him in September or October with a white cockade go within the 
courtyard of Holyrood House. I saw him in company with Lord George 
Murray and Lord Elcho. I don't know that he had the highland dress. 

JOHN VERE. Lauchlan MacLauchlan of Castle Lauchlan : I knew 
one Colonel MacLauchlan, but not by the name of Castle Lauchlan. 
He was called so by several persons in my hearing, and he answered to 
the name. The 3rd December he waited upon the Pretender. I saw him 
at Macclesfield. He acted as Colonel to the MacLauchlans in the rebel 
army. I don't know his Christian name ; he was reputed head of the 
MacLauchlans. 

WM. HASTIE. Lauchlan MacLauchlan of Castle Lauchlan : I saw 
a person whom I did not know before, who was generally called 
MacLauchlan. I saw him first in England at Carlisle. He was sent 
from Carlisle into Scotland. He acted as an officer with the rebels. I 
saw him in Scotland in January, upon the march, as they came back into 
Scotland. I never heard him called MacLauchlan of Castle Lauchlan, 
nor by his Christian name. I saw him first at Carlisle in November. 
He went from Carlisle in November. At the latter end of January I saw 
him in the rebel army, and he was after that in their marches acting as 
an officer. 

JOHN MACKINNON OF MACKINNON. 

JOHN VERE. John Mackinnon of Mackinnon : I saw a gentleman 
called Colonel Mackinnon, chief of the Mackinnons. He was called 
in my hearing Colonel Mackinnon, and answered to the name. I 
saw him several times in arms in the rebel army in December last. He 
commanded the Mackinnons. He acted as colonel of that regiment. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. John Mackinnon of Mackinnon : I saw him 
in the rebellion, with his men, march in the rebel army, and commanded 
them. Thirty of his men deserted because they were sensible they were 
in a wrong cause. 

w i 



362 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

CHARLES STEWART OF ARDSHIEL. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. Charles Stewart of Ardshiel : In September or 
October I saw him in Edinburgh. He was reputed to be a colonel. 
I saw him one day at the head of his regiment the rebel Stewarts of 
Appin with a carbine. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Charles Stewart of Ardshiel: I saw him at Perth 
march at the head of his men when the young Pretender was there in 
September. He had a highland dress, and arms, and was the commander 
of those men, who came to join the young Pretender's forces. I did not 
know him before I saw him at Perth. I saw him often there. He 
commonly passed by that name (Ardshiel). 

JOHN VERE. Charles Stewart of Ardshiel : I saw a gentleman a 
big fat man, troubled with a lethargy. I was told he was Stewart of 
Ardshiel, and he answered to that name. I saw him march at the head 
of his regiment in December last. 

WM. HASTIE. Charles Stewart of Ardshiel : I did not know him 
before I saw him in arms (as one of the rebels) several times upon their 
march into England and back again. He commanded Stewart of 
Appin's clan. He was called Stewart of Ardshiel. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Charles Stewart of Ardshiel : He marched 
with the rebel army all the time from October. 

Q. If a man deserts his chief, what is the consequence? 
Ans. They run a risk. 

GEORGE LOCKHART, ELDEST SON AND HEIR-APPARENT OF 
GEORGE LOCKHART OF CARNWARTH. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. George Lockhart : When the rebels were at 
Edinburgh I saw him several times there. I know no more. 

JOHN VERE. George Lockhart : I have known him at Oxford. I 
saw him at Congleton in arms in the rebellion with a broadsword. He 
was A.D.C. to the young Pretender ; I saw him act as such, and he 
marched with the rebel army. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 363 

WM. HASTIE. George Lockhart : I did not know him before the 
rebellion. He was called George Lockhart the younger of Carmvarth. 
He went along with the rebels from Edinburgh. He was in arms. He 
was A.D.C. (generally called so) to the young Pretender between 1st 
November and February. 

JAMES BARCLAY. George Lockhart : I know him, but not before 
the rebellion. In October last I saw him at Edinburgh acting as A.D.C. 
to the Pretender, and he was with us upon the whole march among the 
rebels. I never saw him give any orders. 



LAWRENCE OLIPIIANT THE ELDER OF CASK. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Lawrence Oliphant of Gask : I have known him 
twenty years. I saw him in Perth with the young Pretender. I looked 
upon him as an officer. I saw him among the men when they were 
drawn up. He was one among the rebels in the young Pretender's 
service. 

JOHN VERE. Lawrence Oliphant of Gask : In December I saw a 
gentleman then called Laird of Gask, who answered to the name. I saw 
him in arms upon the march of the rebel army. He was called Colonel 
Oliphant of Gask. I don't know his xtian name. He is 50 or thereupon. 
The eldest son in Scotland is usually called the young laird. 

[NOTE. / am afraid Mr. Vere as to this gentleman is mistaken, for I 
am informed he was not in England, and the other ivitnesses 
seem fully sufficient as to this gentleman ivitlwut relying upon 
Mr. Vere.~\ 

JOHN GRAY. Lawrence Oliphant : I saw him at Perth when I was 
prisoner about Christmas. He signed a warrant against me, as Dep'. 
Governor in the Pretender's service, as I understood, to commit me to 
prison. The name was Oliphant. I don't know his Christian name. I 
don't know of what place he was designed. I don't know that he signed 
the warrant, but they told me it was Oliphant of Gask who signed it ; 
the officers showed me the warrant. Oliphant of Gask was reputed to 
have some command at Perth. I was committed at Perth as a friend to 
the King. 



364 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Lawrence Oliphant : I did not know him before 
the rebellion, but in February I saw him in Perth. He was Depute- 
Governor of Perth to Lord Strathallan, under the Pretender. He was so 
called and reputed. I saw him going to Hickson's when Lord Strath- 
allan was to keep their council there, as was understood. The Aberdeen 
battalion of about 200 men was then there. I saw him among those 
who seemed to belong to the Pretender. I never saw him do any acts, 
but they called him Depute-Gov 1 '. He was giving the gunners, who 
belong to the French, some orders to steer their guns. I don't know him 
by name as Lawrence, but he was called and understood to be Oliphant 
the elder of Cask. I never heard him called by the name of Lawrence. 
I don't know the xtian names of any whom I have spoken of. 

JAMES LOGIE. Lawrence Oliphant : I have seen a gentleman at 
Aberdeen whom the rebels call Oliphant the elder of Gask. I saw him 
in February come on horseback into Aberdeen at the head of a troop of 
horse, I believe in the Pretender's service, with one drum and a standard 
in the evening 3, 4, or 5 o'clock. It was light enough to distinguish one 
man from another. I should not know him again if I should see him. 
The rebels said it was Oliphant the elder of Gask. I know him no 
otherwise, and I heard of him afterwards as being at Aberdeen, but I 
don't know. The last party of horse came in at 5, near 6 ; I cannot be 
positive. The first came in a little after 4 o'clock ; the whole came in 
between five and six. 

Q. Were any of the King's forces then in Aberdeen ? 

Am. No. 

[We can read (it is a common saying) a letter in Aberdeen at 6 in the 
evening in February] 

Captain JOHN READ. I am in His Majesty's service. I know the 
elder of Gask, but not his Christian name, and by the name of Oliphant 
the elder of Gask. I knew him a year before the rebellion. I have seen 
him since to the best of my knowledge in Edinburgh, after the battle of 
Prestonpans in September, or at the battle. I have a paper which I 
saw him sign (the paper produced). Lord Strathallan delivered me the 
paper. Oliphant wrote it in my presence. I cannot say whether I took 
it out of the hand of Oliphant or Lord Strathallan ; the paper was 
brought up and read, signed " Strathallan." This paper was a pass, and 
was written in Perth. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 365 

Q. Who was meant by the Prince of Wales ? 

Ans. The young Pretender. I know Oliphant the younger of Cask, 
his son, for I saw him. He appeared after the battle of Prestonpans in 
September last. I saw him after the action. Old Oliphant was dressed in his 
common clothes, but among the rebels. The son was in a highland dress. 
I saw both father and son among the rebels as part of the rebels at Perth 
and Edinburgh. The younger made offers to me to enter into that service. 

LAWRENCE OLIPHANT THE YOUNGER OF GASK. 

CllAS. CAMPBELL. Lawrence Oliphant the younger of Gask : In 
September or October last I saw him at Edinburgh with a white 
cockade, broadsword, and in a highland dress. He was reputed A.D.C. 
to the Pretender's son, and I saw him go before him on horseback 
toward the camp at Duddingston, where the Pretender's son's army was. 
I did not know him before ; he was generally called by that name. 

JOHN HlCKSON. Lawrence Oliphant of Gask : There was a young 
gentleman there called Lawrence Oliphant, son of Gask ; but whether he 
be elder or younger son I don't know. He answered to the name of 
Oliphant. He was generally understood to be Cask's son. I saw him in 
arms. I have heard Oliphant the elder called Gask, but not the elder. 
I took him to be elder. I took these Oliphants to be father and son 
because of their ages. 

Q. Was Gask understood to be father of young Oliphant ? 

Ans. It was so understood by the rebels. I never heard him called 
the young laird. I saw him march along as one of the rebels, between 
Preston and Lancaster, in December last. 

Q. If he had been the young laird, would he not have been so 
called ? 

Ans. I don't know, but he might ; I heard him called young Gask. 

Q. Would the grandson be called young laird ? 

Ans. If he had been the eldest son, I don't know whether or no he 
would be called the young laird. I don't know his Christian name. He 
was understood, and was called Cask's son ; some told me he was 
Cask's son. 

WM. HASTIE. Lawrence Oliphant the younger of Gask : I did not 
know him before. He came and went back with the rebel army in arms. 
He was called Oliphant the younger of Gask. 



366 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Lawrence Oliphant the younger of Cask : I know 
a person who was called son of Oliphant the elder of Gask. He marched 
and continued with the rebel army, from October to January, as a rebel. 
He was in arms, and A.D.C. to the Pretender. But I never saw him give 
orders. I don't know his age ; I think he is about 20. 

HUGH DOUGLAS. Lawrence Oliphant the younger of Gask: I did 
not know him before the rebellion. I never saw him but at Perth this 
last winter. He was called the young laird of Gask. I never heard him 
called Oliphant. I saw him walking in the streets in highland clothes in 
company with the rebels. He is, I think, about 26. I never saw him 
march. I never saw him but once, and then walking with the rebels 
after the return from England. 

PETER GOLDIE. Lawrence Oliphant the younger of Gask: I saw 
him at Ashburn riding single in the rebel army. He went as the others 
did. He had a white cockade. I don't remember he had a sword. I 
saw him also at Carlisle with the rebel army. He was called Mr. 
Oliphant. I have heard some speak of him by the name of Gask. I 
have seen several in the rebel army without a sword. I saw him at 
Ashburn in October, and at Carlisle in the same month. At Carlisle I 
saw him in the streets. He rode with the rebel army to Carlisle. I 
never saw him ride near the Pretender's son. I never heard him called 
the younger. He is upwards of 20. 



JAMES GRAHAM THE YOUNGER OF AIRTH. 

CliASi CAMPBELL. James Graham the younger of Airth : In 
September or October I saw him in a highland dress, a broadsword and 
pistols. I never saw him march, but I have seen him in company more 
than once with Duke of Perth and Lord George Murray. 

JOHN VERE. James Graham, younger of Airth: I saw a young 
gentleman Kilmarnock told me was Mr. Graham, son of Mr. James 
Graham of Airth. I heard Kilmarnock call him so. I heard him called 
in his own presence Mr. Graham. I saw him in arms on the march as 
one of the rebels. I don't know his Christian name. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 367 

Q. Has Mr. Graham of Airth more sons than one ? 

Ans. I don't know. The father is laird of Airth ; the son is not 
called laird of Airth. Kilmarnock called him, in the hearing of the 
young man, son of James Graham of Airth, and he did not deny it. 

Q. Has " Master " a different signification from " Mr." ? 

Ans. The eldest sons of Barons are called " Master," other gentlemen 
" Mr." Lord Kilmarnock at Leek said to me, " This is the son of Mr. 
James Graham of Airth, whom you and I met at Falkirk on i4th 
September." Mr. Graham was there with a lady, whom I took for his 
wife. 

JAMES BARCLAY. James Graham, younger of Airth : I saw him 
march out of Edinburgh with the rebels. I did not know him before the 
rebellion. He wore a sword. I frequently saw him with the rebel army 
upon the march. He was generally called James Graham the younger 
of Airth. He appeared to be between 20 and 30 above 20 a pretty 
tall man, neither thin nor fat. I don't know what command he had. He 
always rode where the young Pretender was. 

% JOHN ROY STKWART. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. John Roy Stewart : In October and November I 
saw him at the head of his regiment in arms for the Pretender's son, 
and I have seen him with Lord George Murray in the highland dress. 
I have seen him in the Pretender's tent. I did not know him before. 
He commonly went by that name. I was hardly a day without seeing 
him. 

JOHN HlCKSON. John Roy Stewart : I have known him twenty 
years. I saw him travelling as a private gentleman after the rebels had 
left Perth on nis way to Edinburgh. 

Q. Did you see him with the rebels ? 

Ans. I don't remember. He has been in France many years. 

Q. Did he enquire after the Pretender's son. 

Ans. He asked where the Pretender's army (called by him as I 
suppose, but can't be positive, "the Prince's army") was gone. 

JOHN VERE. John Roy Stewart : I knew him before the rebellion. 
He was a quartermaster in the King's service. He was colonel of a 



368 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

regiment of 6 companies, as he told me himself. He acted as such. I 
saw him on the march with the rebels from 3rd December to the 2oth. 

WM. HASTIE. John Roy Stewart : I did not know him before. I 
saw him in arms upon the march of the rebels into England and back 
again. 

JOHN GRAY. John Roy Stewart : I saw him at Stirling. I knew 
him before. He was one day in highland clothes, and the other in other 
clothes. He was understood to be an officer with the rebels. He was 
formerly a quartermaster in the Scotch Greys or Gardiner's Dragoons, as 
I have heard. I did not see him do any act of hostility. 

Q. Who were in possession of Stirling then ? 

Ans. The town was in the Pretender's possession and the castle in 
the King's. The Highlanders in the town were supposed to be in the 
Pretender's service attacking the castle. 

JAMES BARCLAY. John Roy Stewart : I know him. I did not know 
him before the rebellion. I saw him everywhere after the rebels 
marched from Edinburgh to Derby and back to Glasgow with them. 
He was colonel of a regiment in the young Pretender's service. He was 
generally reputed to have been quartermaster in the Scots Greys, and 
generally called Colonel John Roy Stewart in the Pretender's army. 

FRANCIS FARQUH ARSON OF MONALTRIE. 

JOHN VEKE. Francis Farquharson of Monaltrie: I saw a gentle- 
man called Colonel Farquharson who commanded the Farquharsons. 
I knew him not before, neither his Christian name, nor the addition of 
Monaltrie. I saw him in arms upon the march of the rebel army. 

Q. Are there not many Farquharsons in Scotland ? 

Ans. I am not of that part of the country. He commanded the 
Farquharsons as was generally understood in the rebel army in December 
last. He acted as other rebel colonels did. 

JAMES LOGIE. Francis Farquharson of Monaltrie : I knew him 
before the rebellion. I saw him at Aberdeen with a white cockade and 
a broadsword not in the highland dress. He came in at the head of a 
body of foot, about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, in December last. I saw 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 369 

him. The body of men were dressed in highland clothes mostly, and 
were deemed rebels. He stayed several days with them. In Aberdeen 
they dress as I do ; a Lowland town. I say this of my own knowledge. 
The body of men came into Aberdeen with bagpipes playing, swords 
drawn, colours flying, and he had his sword drawn. 

ALEXANDER MACGILLIVRAV OF DUNMAGLAS. 

JOHN GRAY. Alexander MacGillivray of Dunmaglas : I saw a 
person called MacGillivray among the Mackintoshes, as was understood. 
I saw him among those highland men, and they were deemed rebels. 
I saw men about him in arms at Perth at Christmas last. I never 
saw him but once. I heard him called to, but not in his hearing. I 
cannot declare positively that he was in arms, but 1 thought so. I am 
not sure he is the person, and I could not know him again. 

Q. Don't the Sutherland people wear highland dress ? 

Aits. Yes, and yet are all loyal to a man, as far as I know. 

JAMES LOGIE. Alexander MacGillivray of Dunmaglas: I know 
him by sight, and knew him very well before the rebellion. I have seen 
him in the highland habit at Stonehive and Aberdeen. He was in the 
rebel army, and marched at the head of his men in arms for the Pretender, 
as I understood. I saw him in arms, and march in the months of 
December and February. 

LAUCHLAN MACKINTOSH, MERCHANT, INVERNESS. 

JOHN GRAY. Lauchlan Mackintosh : I knew him and saw him at 
Perth. He had the highland dress, but I did not see him do any act of 
hostility. He was in company of persons supposed to be rebels. 

Q. Did any person wear swords but rebels ? 

Ans. I cannot say. 

JAMES LOGIE. Lauchlan Mackintosh : I have seen him before the 
rebellion. I have seen him at Stonehive, Aberdeen, and Dundee in 
December and February last. He was in the highland habit, broad- 
sword, and white cockade. I saw him with Dunmaglas's men. He was 
said to be lieut.-colonel to that regiment. I saw him march with them as 
part of the rebel army in arms. 

x i 



370 DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 

MALCOLM ROSS, SON OF ALEXANDER ROSS OF PITCALNIE. 

JOHN GRAY. Malcolm Ross of Pitcalnie : I saw him at Perth, and 
not in highland clothes. I did not see him act at all, in arms or on march. 
He was in the town when the rebels were there. He asked me how I 
came there, but he did not propose to engage me in the Pretender's 
service. 

JAMES LOGIE. Malcolm Ross of Pitcalnie : I knew him well. I 
saw him in Aberdeen in February in a highland habit, broadsword, and 
white cockade. I saw him come into the town with a body of men who 
were deemed rebels in a warlike manner, and stayed with them there. 



ALEXANDER MACLEOD, SON OF JOHN MACLEOD, ADVOCATE. 

WM. HASTIE. Alexander Macleod, son of John Macleod : I did not 
know him. I saw him first at Brampton with the rebels in November. 
He was in arms. I saw him all the way. He was called Mr. Macleod. 
I heard him called Alexander and son of John Macleod. He was 
A.D.C. to the young Pretender, as I heard him called. He was generally 
called A.D.C. to the young Pretender. 

ANGUS MACKINNON. Alexander Macleod, son of John Macleod, 
advocate : I heard he was among the rebels. I saw him in the rebel 
army at Kendal. He was A.D.C. to the Pretender's son, and acted as 
such that day he was at Carlisle. I saw him in arms with the rebels 
since October last. 



JOHN HAY, PORTIONER, OF RESTALRIG, W.S. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL. John Hay, portioner, of Restalrig: In October 
he put on a white cockade after he returned from Glasgow. He was 
said to be sent to Glasgow to uplift the taxes. I saw him frequently 
with a small sword and white cockade, in company with Duke of 
Perth, Lord George Murray, and Murray of Broughton. In November 
I saw him at Dalkeith with a broadsword and white cockade. I never 
saw him in any body of men. At Edinburgh scarce a day passed that I 
did not see him. 



DEPOSITIONS AGAINST JACOBITES. 37! 

JOHN VERE. John Hay, portioner, of Restalrig, W.S. : I knew him 
in Edinburgh, and saw him in arms 3rd December last at Sir Peter 
Davenport's house, and upon the march with the rebel army in arms in 
December last. He acted as Deputy Secretary. 



ANDREW LUMSDALE, SON OF WILLIAM LUMSDALE, WRITER IN 

EDINBURGH. 

JOHN VERE. Andrew Lumsdale, son of William Lumsdalc, writer 
in Edinburgh : I saw a gentleman called Mr. Lumsdale. I don't know 
his Christian name. I don't know him to be son of Lumsdale, writer in 
Edinburgh. He acted as one of the Under Secretaries to Mr. Murray. 
I saw him give receipts for the young Pretender. He was in the rebel 
army as a rebel in arms. I did not know this man, nor the last, before 
I saw them in the rebellion. 

WM. HASTIE. Andrew Lumsdale, son of William Lumsdale, writer, 
Edinburgh : I knew him before. He is reputed Mr. Lumsdale's son. 
He went with and continued in the rebel army. He was clerk to the 
Secretary, Murray. 

Q, Could you among 100 people distinguish all those you have 
named ? 

Ans. Yes, I believe I can. 

JAMES BARCLAY. Andrew Lumsdale, son of William Lumsdale: I 
have seen him. I did not know him before. He went by the name of 
Lumsdale. He acted as Deputy Secretary to the Pretender's son. I 
have seen him levy the excise at Glasgow for the Pretender in January. 
The Pretender was then at Glasgow. I saw him in the army with the 
rebels upon their march. His name is Lumsdale. I never saw his name 
written. He was called Lumsdale. 

Q. What business did you follow before the rebellion ? 

Ans. I was two years at sea. 

PAT. GOLDIE. Andrew Lumsdale, son of William Lumsdale : I knew 
him, but not before the rebellion. I saw him in the Secretary's office of 
Murray, Secretary to the Pretender, in Holyrood House. I saw him 
several times in the army among the rebels, and several times in October 
and November. He went by the name of Andrew Lumsdale. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

[THE KING AGAINST THE SEVERAL REBEL OFFICERS WHO WERE 
TAKEN PRISONERS AT CARLISLE AND BROUGHT TO LONDON.] 

In June, 1745, the eldest son of the Pretender landed in the West 
Highlands of Scotland, and soon afterwards MacDonald of Clanronald, 
Cameron of Lochiel, MacDonell of Keppoch, and other Highland chiefs 
rose in open rebellion and joined the Pretender's son, and were soon 
afterwards joined by the Marquis of Tullibardine and his brother, Lord 
George Murray, Lord Elcho, the person called Duke of Perth, and a 
great number of Scots, and then marched towards Perth, and from 
thence towards Edinburgh, by which time they had increased to about 
5000 men, and then marched into and took possession of Edinburgh, and 
there proclaimed the Pretender, and from thence marched to a village 
called Prestonpans, near Edinburgh, and there on the 2ist of September 
last attacked the King's forces under the command of General Cope, 
killed a great many of them, defeated them, and took a great many 
prisoners and sent them into several prisons in the Highlands, and also 
took the King's horse, cannon, arms, and colours, and in October last the 
rebels being increased by the junction of other rebels under the command 
of Lord Kilmarnock, Lord Pitsligo, the person called Lord Nairn, Lord 
Ogilvie, Gordon of Glenbucket, making together about 5000 men, 
marched towards England, one part of them by the way of Peebles and 
Moffat, and the other part by Jedburgh and Kelso, and joined again at 
Brampton in Cumberland, about 8 miles from Carlisle, whence they 
marched and laid siege to Carlisle, and opened trenches before and took 
it on or before i6th November, and there proclaimed the Pretender 
again, and after staying there five or six days they all marched to Penrith 
in Cumberland, leaving a garrison in the castle and city of Carlisle, 
under the command of John Hamilton, who was made by the Pretender's 
son governor of the castle, and thence proceeded to Kendall, and from 
thence to Lancaster, and from thence to Preston, and from thence to 
Wigan and to Manchester, where they halted a day or two, and thence 
proceeded to Macclesfield in Cheshire, and thence to Leek in Stafford- 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 373 

shire, and thence to Ashburn in Derbyshire, and thence to Derby, where 
they halted, and in all this march they collected the land tax, excise and 
post revenues, under pain of military execution ; issued warrants in the 
name of the Pretender's son to seize arms and horses, which they seized 
wherever they found, and took away with them ; and proclaimed the 
Pretender King in all the great towns upon the said march. His 
Majesty's forces being collected together in Staffordshire under the 
command of his Royal Highness the Duke, who immediately marched 
part of his forces towards the rebels, and made preparations to attack 
them, and stopped their further progress in this kingdom, whereupon the 
rebels, after halting two nights and one day at Derby, marched back 
again to Carlisle the same road they came, and the Duke, with a 
detachment of his Majesty's forces, pursued them to Clifton, near 
Penrith, in Cumberland, where a party of the rebels drew up behind 
hedges and walls to oppose the King's forces till the rebels had got their 
artillery up, and fired upon and killed several of the King's soldiers with 
small arms, and then it being dark the rebels marched in the night 
through Penrith to Carlisle, and from thence to Scotland, leaving a 
garrison of about four or five hundred men under the command of John 
Hamilton, who was governor of the castle, and Francis Townley, who 
was the commandant of the city, in order to defend the same against the 
King's forces, and thereby retard the march of the King's forces and 
assist the rebel army in making their escape into Scotland. On the 
2Oth of December last the King's forces under his Royal Highness 
invested the town and castle of Carlisle, and in about six or seven days, 
having got some battering cannon, he attacked the city and castle, which 
was defended by the rebel garrison with cannon and small arms till 
Monday the thirtieth December last, when the rebels surrendered the 
town and castle at discretion, and in which defence the several defendants 
after named acted as officers and did duty as such in mounting guard, 
and otherwise in defending the town against the King's forces. 

FRANCIS T O \V N L E V. 
[Sir John Strange' s opening speech at the trial of Francis Toivnley.~\ 

May it please your Lordship, and you, Gentlemen of the Jury. I am 
likewise of counsel on the side of the prosecution against the prisoner at 



374 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

the bar, who stands indicted for levying of war against the King, in his 
realm, which is declared to be high treason by the express words of the 
Statute of the 251/1 of Ediud. jei. 

And on this occasion the matter to be submitted to the consideration 
of you, Gentlemen of the Jury, will be plain and easy ; for you will not 
be involved in the difficulties that attend the unravelling of dark and 
intricate plots, carried on by fictitious names, cant words and cyphers, the 
result of private and midnight transactions, nor in attending to what the 
law calls interpretative or constructive levyings of war, which may be 
matters of doubt and difficulty, but are only called upon to deliver a 
plain, simple question of fact, which is, whether the prisoner at the bar is 
one of those who joined in the late rebellion or not. It is with infinite 
gratitude and pleasure I call it the late rebellion, since I think that by 
the blessing of God, his Majestie's paternal care of his people, and the 
prudent, cautious, and intrepid behaviour of his Royal Highness the 
Duke, we have all reasonable foundation to think this wicked rebellion 
is at an end. 

In order to bring the prisoner at the bar to justice he is charged 
(i) To have assembled with a great multitude of traitors and rebels, 
armed and arrayed in warlike and hostile manner, with colours displayed, 
drums beating, pipes playing ; (2) To have actually armed, arrayed, and 
disposed himself in such manner ; (3) To have prepared, ordered, waged 
and levied a publick and cruel war against the King in his realm ; (4) To 
have entered, possessed, kept and defended the city and castle of Carlisle 
against the King, which facts, if proved, will beyond all dispute amount 
to high treason, and for this I may appeal to the Counsel for the prisoner. 

My Lord Chief-Justice Hale, in his ist Vol. of Hist. PI. Cor. 150, 
says " that levying of war is partly a question of fact. It must (says he) 
be such an assembly as carries with it Specie Belli, as if they ride or 
march vexillis explicatis, or if they be formed into companies or 
furnished with military officers, or if they are armed with military 
weapons, as swords, guns, pikes, &c., and are so circumstanced that it 
may be reasonably concluded they are in a posture of war, and the 
reason (says he) is because when they thus arm themselves it is a plain 
evidence they mean to defend themselves, and make good their attempts 
by a military force, and to resist and subdue all power that shall be used 
to suppress them." 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 375 

And Lord Coke makes the holding of a fort or castle against the King 
to be an actual levying of war against him. As this is most indisputably 
law, it remains only to state to your Lordship and the Jury by what 
evidence we propose to bring the prisoner at the bar within the guilt of 
the offence laid in the indictment, and I think I may venture to say that 
there is not a single circumstance in my Lord Hale's description of 
levying war that will not be brought home to the gentleman at the bar. 

The late rebellion, as everybody knows, broke out the last summer, 
and from small beginnings raged over the greatest part of Scotland, till 
the rebels had possessed themselves of the capital there. An unfortunate 
action at Prestonpans encouraged their march into England, the besieging 
and taking of Carlisle, and then advancing southward. The case of the 
prisoner at the bar takes its rise here ; for upon their arrival at Man- 
chester a regiment was there beat up for and formed, and the prisoner at 
the bar accepted the command of it as colonel of the Manchester 
Regiment. Then it was that he disposed himself for that service ; he 
armed himself, as will appear, with a sword, a gun, a pair of pistols, and 
put on a plaid, sash, and a white cockade, the distinguishing marks of 
the rebel army. The colours that were carried in this regiment had a 
motto to this purport. On the one side was inscribed " Liberty and 
Property," and on the other, as I am instructed, were the words " Church 
and Country," words (I will argue) of great significance if properly 
applied in the sense every true Englishman and Protestant understands. 
But as applied to us they signify the reverse. The word Liberty can 
mean nothing but slavery. The word Property imports our being stripped 
of everything. The word ClntrcJi, could be only meant for introducing 
the Popish religion and superstition ; and the word Country (though they 
would affect to use it otherwise) must stand for an arbitrary Government 
in opposition to the mild and happy Government under which we live 
the blessings of a Protestant succession in his Majesty's Royal Family, 
and in the place of these, to the great dishonour of the nation, reducing 
these kingdoms to a province of France. With these views it was the 
rebels (amongst whom the prisoner was one) advanced to Derby, where 
their hearts failed them, for upon the face of the Duke's approach they 
retired back through many towns to the great sorrow and danger of his 
Majesty's loyal subjects, and arrived at Carlisle, then a garrison for the 
Pretender. Into this city the prisoner entered at the head of his 



376 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

regiment, and was made commandant of the city for the Pretender, and 
from then acted as such on all occasions. 

When the Duke came before the town the prisoner defended it against 
the King's forces. He drew up his men, placed himself at their head, 
mounted guard in his turn, made a sally and gave orders for burning a 
place from whence some of his Majesty's loyal subjects had fired upon 
the rebels. 

When the city was taken he was made prisoner, to be disposed of at 
his Majesty's pleasure, and upon that occasion acknowledged himself to 
have been colonel of the Manchester Regiment, and delivered up his 
commission from the Pretender for that command. And I cannot in 
justice (to the right reposed in me) conceal that upon the surrender of 
the place the prisoner at the bar was greatly exasperated, and declared 
his resolution to have held it out to the last, expressions which you, 
gentlemen, will hear from the witnesses. 

This, gentlemen, is the light in which (if I am rightly instructed) the 
prisoner will appear ; and this is the share he has had in this rebellion. 
It must be owned our all has been at stake a great deliverance we have 
had and I wish the sense of so great blessings may make us better men 
for the future. The cause of our religion, our King, and our country 
require our taking all proper methods of preventing the like confusions, 
and I must submit it to you whether one of the necessary means for that 
purpose is not the bringing those to justice who have thus armed them- 
selves to our destruction. And if we prove this prisoner at the bar to 
have joined in this treason in the manner that has been opened, though 
your good nature may incline you to pity him, yet I apprehend your 
justice must condemn him. 

SAM. MADDOCK. I was prevailed upon to join the rebels 
at Manchester, and after two or three days I repented of what I 
had done ; but in order to make me easy the defendant assured me I 
should be surgeon and apothecary to the Manchester Regiment. The 
defendant came with the rebels to Manchester, and was there reputed 
to be colonel of the Manchester Regiment, and had a servant in livery 
attending him. They had each a brace of pistols and a sword, and the 
defendant appeared as colonel all the march to Carlisle. At Carlisle the 
defendant declared he was 80 out of pocket in paying the men and 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 377 

otherwise on account of the regiment. The defendant was appointed 
Governor of Carlisle, and acted as such ; gave all the orders in Carlisle, made 
a sally at the English port, and ordered iron works to be made to prevent 
the Duke's horse approaching the gate, and expressed himself as much 
exasperated at the Governor of Carlisle's surrendering saying, " It was 
better to die by the sword than to fall into the hands of those damned 
Hanoverians." The defendant and some other rebels between Ashburn 
and Derby brought from a gentleman's house a sackful of arms. 

ROGER MACDONALD. I saw the defendant often upon the march 
with the rebel army between Derby and Carlisle at the head of the 
Manchester Regiment, particularly between Preston and Lancaster, on 
horseback, armed with a sword and pistols before him, with his colours 
flying, the motto of which was on one side " Liberty and Property," 
and on the other "Church and Country." I saw the defendant after- 
wards among the rebels in Carlisle. 

AUSTIN COLEMAN, No. 34. I was one of the pioneers to the rebel 
army, and marched with them from Manchester to Derby and back to 
Carlisle. Saw defendant in the rebel army, first at Macclesfield and 
afterwards upon the march every day till Carlisle surrendered to the 
Duke. On the march he was armed with sword and pistols, a plaid, 
sash, and cockade. Saw him at the head of the Manchester Regiment, 
of which he was colonel, in the castle of Carlisle when the rebel army 
marched from thence to Scotland, and he then had a sword, plaid, 
sash, and cockade. 

ORMESBY MACCORMACK, No. 86. I was drawn up in the 
Manchester Regiment in the castle of Carlisle before the defendant as 
their colonel, when a great quantity of arms were given among them, 
and he had then his plaid, sash, and cockade. Saw him at the guard- 
room in Carlisle when it was besieged by the Duke, and he was reputed 
to have, and witness believes he had, the command of the town of 
Carlisle. 

JAMES WARREN, No. 36; THOS. JAY, No. 58 ; HUGH MACDUGALL, 
No. 60. These all testify as to his presence with the rebels on the march 
and at Carlisle. 

Y i 



378 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

THOS. CRAGG, No. 88. The defendant marched at the head of a 
party of men armed with guns to the Town Hall, in Carlisle, which was 
the guard-room when the King's army besieged it. Prisoner was along 
with the rebels at Preston in their retreat with a white cockade in his 
hat. I saw him march out of Preston at the head of the Manchester 
Regiment on horseback, with pistols before him. Saw him at head of 
said regiment drawn up on Penrith Moor on foot, with a sword by his 
side and a gun in his hand. Saw him afterwards upon guard in the 
town of Carlisle, of which the English had the guard when it was 
besieged by the Duke of Cumberland. 

JOHN DAVISON. -I saw the defendant amongst the rebels in Carlisle 
with a sword by his side. A carrier's house in Carlisle was burnt, which 
was said to be done by defendant's orders. Witness complained of it to 
him, and defendant answered that some people had been firing from 
thence upon the citadel, which witness looked upon as defendant's reason 
for having ordered said house to be burnt. 

JOHN VERE. I was taken prisoner by the rebels and carried with 
them to Carlisle, and was kept confined in the guard-room in the castle 
during the time it was besieged by the Duke. Several times I saw the 
defendant come into the guard-room with a sword by his side and a 
white cockade in his hat, he being commandant of the city of Carlisle. 
After the town surrendered witness saw the defendant deliver up his 
commission to Captain Desbrosses, which witness read at that time, and 
it being shown to him now is sure it is the same. 

NOTE. This commission was not marked by tlie witness so as to know 
his oivn hand again. Tlie commission appoints defendant to be 
colonel of liis Majesty s forces as there called, and commandant 
of tlie town of Carlisle. Is dated igth December, 174.5, signed 
at top " Charles P.R" and at bottom " C.P.R." and sealed. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. Upon the surrender of the town of 
Carlisle these gentlemen and others were ordered by his Royal Highness 
to view and mark the rebel officers who defended the town, and were 
there taken so as to know them again, which they did, and knows the 
prisoner to be one of them : there being no promise of pardon on the 
surrender. 

[Found guilty, and executed joth July, 1746.} 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 379 

GEORGE FLETCHER. 

SAM. HADDOCK. When the rebel army came to Manchester 
the defendant enlisted into the Pretender's service, and was made 
a captain in the Manchester Regimeut. Have heard and believes 
the defendant gave Gi5o for his commission, and marched with the 
rebels to Derby and back to Carlisle on horseback. He acted as a 
captain in the said regiment on the march ; was armed with a brace of 
pistols and a small sword ; wore a laced hat and white cockade, a plaid, 
laced waistcoat, and his servant in livery carried his gun. At Macclesfield 
the defendant pulled out a large quantity of gold, and told the witness 
that so long as that lasted he should never want. During the siege of 
Carlisle by the Duke the defendant acted there as a captain and paid his 
company, and frequently mounted guard in the Town Hall, armed as 
aforesaid. 

THOS. BRADBURY. The defendant was called and reputed to be a 
captain in the Manchester Regiment in the rebel army, and I saw 
him along with one of the rebel sergeants and drummers, who were 
beating up for volunteers in Manchester for the Pretender ; and im- 
mediately after the sergeant said the words, " God bless the King "- 
James or Prince Charles I cannot now remember which the defendant, 
with the other rebels present, pulled off his hat and huzza'd. There 
were 1000 people, and but 20 shouted "God save King James." 

THOS. CRAGG ; ORMESBY MACCOK.MACK ; AUSTIN COLEMAN. 
Testify as to the defendant's being with the Manchester Regiment to 
Derby and Carlisle, having on a plaid, sash, and cockade. 

JOSEPH SIKES. Witness saw the defendant among the rebels at 
Derby, but knows not whether he had arms or a cockade. 

BENJ. BOWKER. The night the vanguard of the rebels came to 
Manchester I saw the defendant amongst them, and several other 
Manchester men in a room at the Bull Head Inn with a white cockade 
in his hat. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. They were ordered by the Duke to 
view the officers who defended the town, and know defendant to be one 
of them. 



380 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

ANNE ACTON. Knew him from birth a boarder with his mother, 
and carried on the linen trade. Captain Robinson and seven men 
quartered there ; the mother went away. On the return Captain 
Robinson swore he should go with them tears in his eyes. One got 
him by the collar, and I never saw him after. The family loyal subjects 
to King George, and Protestants. Took him by the collar going to and 
on return from Derby. He came alone to his house ; when he came 
back he had boots on, and lay in a room by himself. 

JOHN HEYWOOD. Prisoner 25 years old ; good character. 
CIIAS. WERREL. A warehouse-keeper in London ; a fair dealer. 



[Sir John Strange s reply en trial of George Fletcher.'} 

As they have done on the part of the prisoner, it comes to my turn 
to trouble your Lordship and the Jury with a few words by way of 
reply ; and as a great many things have been thrown out which are not 
material to the question whether the prisoner has been guilty of high 
treason or not, I will take notice of them as I go along, in order to lay 
them out of the case. The point they set out with is, that the prisoner 
has material witnesses who, they say, he could not compel to appear 
upon the trial, and that he has not had time to bring up his witnesses. I 
am surprised there should be any complaint of this kind, for the prisoner 
had a long indulgence of time, upon his own application and affidavit, 
to bring his witnesses here, which application he did not renew ; and as 
to saying he could not compel them to come here, he had a right by law 
by a process to oblige them to come. I don't find there is any proof 
that any have been served with process for that purpose, for if they had, 
surely no man would be so sparing of his labour, if he could save a 
man's life, as not to take a journey for that purpose. He must be tried 
upon the evidence that is laid before the Jury, and it is upon that 
evidence they must judge. Both the gentlemen who are counsel for the 
prisoner plume themselves very much upon what Mr. Attorney-General 
opened that the prisoner offered a sum of money for the commission he 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 381 

had ; but when the thing was but just mentioned, Mr. Attorney-General 
was so fair as to stop the witness, who only said he had heard it, and as 
the circumstance is not proved, you, gentlemen, must take no notice of it 
as part of the cause. They have said also that several of the witnesses 
on behalf of the Crown, though they are legal witnesses, are to be 
considered as witnesses concerned in the crime, and therefore are not to 
be considered as credible evidence. But for my part, I don't know why 
these witnesses ought not to meet with credit, for if accomplices are not 
allowed to be witnesses (and it is a common thing almost at every 
sessions at the Old Baily) there would be great difficulty in the convicting 
of any persons of these crimes. Indeed, if this depended solely upon 
the evidence of a single person who is an accomplice, it would have very 
little weight, but when it is confirmed by a great many witnesses you will 
give it its proper weight, and besides those witnesses, you have had a 
gentleman in the service of the King, who was sent by the Duke of 
Cumberland to take an account of the names and ranks of the prisoners. 
He asked the prisoner his name, and he said his name was George 
Fletcher. He asked him in what capacity he was, and he said a captain. 
He went the next day by the Duke's command and called them all over 
again, and the prisoner at the bar answered to the same name he had 
given in the day before, and I do not find that his being forced was 
mentioned at that time. Now, as that objection with regard to 
accomplices is out of the case, what defence has the prisoner at the 
bar made? They say that he was always a good and loyal subject to 
his Majesty King George, and that he was forced into this rebellion, and 
that this force continued from the beginning to the end, and that he 
never had any liberty to withdraw himself from it, and if it is as they 
say, it is your duty to acquit him ; and from the proof, or failure of 
proving these circumstances, you are to judge whether he has been guilty 
of high treason or not. As to his being forced into the rebellion, which 
has been made use of in his behalf, though it is a defence, yet in point of 
law it must be proved in the clearest manner in order to answer the open 
acts of treason that are proved upon him. In the case of those who 
supplied Sir John Oldcastle and his accomplices then in rebellion with 
victuals, they were acquitted because it was found to be done pro timore 
mortis et quod recesserunt quam cito potuerunt. So there must be in 
point of law a total disinclination to the cause, a laying hold of the first 



382 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

opportunity to desert it. And what proof is there of that in this case ? 
They call a woman servant, who swears that he went into the rebellion 
by force, and mentions the circumstance of a rebel's taking hold of his 
collar and saying he should go with them upon the first march from 
Manchester to Derby, and again upon their return, and going from 
Manchester to Carlisle, and that he had tears in his eyes ; but if you will 
consider some circumstance I will put you in mind of, it will greatly 
outweigh that or the other evidence. When the rebels came into Man- 
chester they raised a regiment and got officers, and the prisoner's name 
was entered down as a captain, which promotion he accepted, and was 
reviewed as such by the Pretender's son. Do you find that he at any 
time after that declined this ? No ; he put on his military accoutrements, 
mounted guard, acted as an officer in the regiment, and the prisoner was 
so far from being backward in consenting to this, that when one of the 
rebel officers was beating up for volunteers, upon his saying " God bless 
King James " or " Prince Charles," the prisoner pulled off his hat and 
huzza'd. And although there were a thousand people within hearing, 
there were but twenty that joined with the prisoner in so doing. When 
Maddock, whose evidence they do not pretend to dispute now, told him 
he had a mind to leave them, he pulled out a handful of gold, and said 
while that lasted he should never want. If I do mistake, I beg to be set 
right. God forbid 1 should mention it if it is not proved that he pulled 
out a handful of gold and said that as long as that lasted he should not 
want. If his being laid hold of by the collar (which the maid has fixed 
on as a circumstance attending both his sallies from Manchester) did 
amount to an original force, yet it is not to be understood as a force 
continuing upon him all the time. Had he no opportunity of getting 
away from them ? Was he always surrounded ? One time they marched 
a whole night, and he might have got away, but you find him in the rebel 
army at the close of the evening, and you find him there in the morning, 
and then you find him as a rebel officer. The woman tells you that 
when he came from Derby back to Manchester he came home alone, and 
lay in a room by himself. If he had had a dislike to the cause, would he 
not have done as his mother did go away with her effects ? But he 
would not. They say he has committed no acts of cruelty that the 
regiment had marched before, and was not at the skirmish at Clifton, 
where there were a great many men lost. There were acts of high 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 383 

treason committed before that, and although he is not charged with any 
particular acts of cruelty, he was actually engaged in this rebellion, and 
all are principals. 

My Lord, I will submit it to your Lordship whether this force, which 
is sworn to, of one man's taking him by the collar, can be considered as 
going into a rebellion pro timore mortis, for, if there had not been a good 
deal of inclination to this, he might have defended himself at first or 
have got from them. They were afterwards formed into companies, and 
then the prisoner chose his own men. There was no talk of force then, 
and I think they were hardly such bad politicians as to make a forced 
man an officer before they had tried him at all. 'Tis hardly to be 
supposed that they would have nominated such a man to the degree of a 
captain in the first instance. There is another thing they say, that the 
evidence against the prisoner is but weak evidence, and not so strong as 
in the case of Mr. Townley yesterday. But where is the difference? Is 
he not marching at the head of the Manchester Regiment in a hostile 
manner, wearing a sword, a plaid, sash, and a white cockade, and acting 
as an officer in that regiment, and defending Carlisle against the King's 
forces, which were the substantial circumstances in the case yesterday ? 
Then, as to his dealings, they say he is a man of credit, and so he may 
be, and they pretend to prove that he is a loyal person to the Govern- 
ment, but I don't know that they have proved any such thing. 

PRISONER'S COUNSEL. Yes, the maid-servant did. 

Sir J. STRANGE. Consider that is only the opinion of the maid- 
servant, and the other witnesses who have been called for him do not 
prove that, though it was opined that they would. 

Upon the whole, gentlemen, you are to consider whether the prisoner 
at the bar is one of those who has been guilty of high treason by joining 
in the late rebellion ; and this is proved by more witnesses than the 
Statute requires, for this has been proved by six or seven witnesses, and 
the law requires but two. Therefore, I apprehend the prisoner is proved 
guilty of this indictment. If there are any alleviating circumstances 
they do not come under your consideration ; what comes under your 
consideration is upon the facts which have been proved, and therefore I 
submit it to you upon the evidence. 

[Found guilty ; executed joth July, 1746.] 



384 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 



ALEXANDER MACGROUTHER, SENIOR. 

JOHN ALLAN, No. 2. The defendant was a lieutenant in the Duke 
of Perth's Regiment, and marched with the rebel army from Edinburgh 
to Carlisle, and was in the trenches in Carlisle when it was besieged and 
taken by the rebels. He was then armed with a sword and a brace of 
pistols. 

JOHN VERE. When the town and castle of Carlisle were besieged 
by the Duke I saw the defendant mount guard in Carlisle as an officer 
in garrison there in defence of the place, and he was then armed with 
a firelock, pistols, and broadsword and dirk, between the 2Oth and 3Oth 
of December, when the town surrendered to the Duke. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The defendant was frequently seen to mount guard 
in Carlisle at the Scotch and English port at the head of parties of the 
rebels when the town was besieged by the Duke. He was armed with a 
broadsword, dirk, and a brace of pistols, and wore the highland habit. 

DAN. McFARLAN, No. 15. I was taken away from my house in 
Perthshire by a party of rebels and carried with them to Edin- 
burgh, from thence to Dalkeith, where I had a baggage horse given 
me to lead. When the rebels marched from thence to Carlisle, 
the defendant was a lieutenant in the regiment called the Duke of 
Perth's regiment in the rebel army, and marched with that regiment as a 
lieutenant from Dalkeith to Carlisle, with colours flying, drums beating, 
and pipes playing before them. The defendant was then armed with 
sword and pistols, and I saw him amongst the rest of the rebels in 
possession of Carlisle on the Saturday after the town and castle 
surrendered to them. The defendant was left in garrison in Carlisle 
when the rebel army marched further into England. He mounted guard 
as an officer both in the town and castle before they returned thither, 
and he continued there in garrison as an officer when it was besieged and 
until it surrendered to the Duke. 

HUGH MCDUGALL, No. 60 ; ISABEL CAMPBELL, No. 72. Testify as 
to defendant's presence in the rebel army in England. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 385 

N 

FOK THE DEFENCE. 

Sergt. WYNNE. He was forced in by Duke of Perth as his vassal 
only tenant by tack. Had a mind to go from Carlisle. There was a 
warning by the Lord which would be enforced by burning house and 
carrying away the effects a reasonable excuse for being in rebellion. 
A general meeting of court was called by the Duke, but he did not 
attend till third court. Then he was surrounded and carried off. He 
attempted to escape from Carlisle. 

JAMES MORRISON. He was under the command of the Duke of 
Perth. Defendant lives near me, and is only a tenant to the Duke of 
Perth. On 28th August the Duke of Perth came to a place within a 
mile of us, and sent a servant to us to convoy him over the Muir of 
Linney. Did not obey first or second summons, but on third (the same 
day) we went, and he proposed our going into the rebellion, which \vc 
refused ; upon which the Duke of Perth ordered fire to the houses, and 
said he would tie anyone with cords. I did not go. He was surrounded 
by the Duke of Perth, Lord Strathallan, and more than 20 highlanders, 
and carried off. Twelve of us were there, and all carried but me. I was 
not tied. My son was a tenant, and would not go. Many tenants did 
not come to the meeting, but their houses were not burnt. I said that I 
would not go, and he said nothing more to me. I am 68 years old ; my 
son 32, but not hurt. Great number of tenants stayed at home, but 
houses not burnt. Prisoner and I were children together ;- five years 
difference in age. 

DUNCAN KRAW. Defendant was a landholder under the Duke of 
Perth. It was the custom to obey commands. On 2gth August a 
servant was sent to desire them to come and convoy the Duke over the 
moor. Second defaults, third summons should be hanged or tied. Then 
they went to the Duke of Perth, and he bade them go with him. He 
said he would give them arms, which witness refused, and some were 
ordered to be tied. Defendant refused. They were surrounded. Prisoner 
made moan. I did not go. The Duke spoke to all. I had no tenure 
from the Duke, but hold a house from him. Does not know whether to 
be a rebel is in tack or not. Were engaged at hay at first and second 
summons. Some of his tenants stayed behind, and were not forced to gang. 



386 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JAMES KING. Three warnings. Cords produced. Not above a score 
summoned. All were told they were to go into the rebellion and fight, 
and prisoner cried. Parties were out to prevent deserting. They under- 
stood it was a hunting when they disobeyed. 

PETER MACLAREN. Three warnings. General notion that they must 
obey. He was a tenant of the Duke of Perth, but not called. Pay 53. 
if don't go. I paid one guinea to be exempted, and so did many more, 
not to cut neighbours' throats. 

CHIEF-JUSTICE as to the defence of force. It does not clearly appear 
what relation he has to the Duke, but no tenure can be created between 
two subjects to justify rebellion against their mutual Sovereign. The 
law as to force rightly laid down by Sir John Strange must be a joining 
for fear of death and returning the first opportunity. He might have 
redeemed himself for money. He has not proved any attempt to leave 
them. He took a commission, and was set to guard others. It must be 
a continuing force to mount to an excuse. 

[Found guilty, but reprieved^ 



HENRY KERR. 

JAMES PATERSON. I know the prisoner, who was called Col. Kerr, 
very well, and that he was aide-de-camp to Lord George Murray. I saw 
him with the rebel army upon the march into England, from Dalkeith 
towards Lauder, and I was sent by Lord Elcho to a gentleman's house, 
about four miles on this side Dalkeith, to bring away what horses I 
thought proper for the use of the rebel army, and upon my arrival 
there the prisoner said that he protected that house, and would not suffer 
me to take away any horses. At that time the prisoner was armed with 
a broadsword and a brace of pistols, and was dressed in an English 
habit, a plain hat and white cockade in it. In the march of the rebel 
army in and out of England I saw the prisoner almost every day 
marching along with the rebel army, always on horseback, with pistols 
before him and a broadsword by his side. The prisoner usually gave 
orders to Lord Elcho about his marching, and was the most vigilant and 






DISPOSITIONS AT JACOBITF: TRIALS. 387 

active man in the rebel army. That the day of the retreat of the rebel 
army from Carlisle into Scotland the prisoner was along with it, and gave 
orders to Lord Elcho's horse to march in the rear of the army. At 
Inverness, whilst that town was in possession of the rebels, I saw the 
prisoner there along with them several times before the battle of Culloden, 
always on foot. Upon the day of the battle of Culloden I saw the 
prisoner upon the field, along with the rebel army, on horseback, with 
pistols before him and his broadsword by his side. 

ROGER MACDONALD. I saw the prisoner a year before he was 
engaged in the rebellion, and saw him often at the Pretender's Court in 
Holyrood House in Edinburgh, after the battle of Prestonpans. lie was 
sometimes called Colonel Kerr, and at other times aide-de-camp to Lord 
George Murray. The night the rebel army arrived at Congleton, near 
Newcastle, in the march towards Derby, a party of rebel army, horse 
and foot, was sent out to patrol in the road leading to Newcastle, which 
party the prisoner had the command of, and was armed with sword and 
pistols, and took Captain Vere prisoner. The day the rebel army 
retreated from Derby I saw the prisoner along with it, on horseback, 
armed as aforesaid. I particularly remember the prisoner sent me a 
horse to ride on. The prisoner did not march in any particular corps, 
but was about in all parts of the rebel army, and brought orders 
to them frequently about their marching, &c. Saw the prisoner on 
horseback, armed with sword and pistols, with the Pretender, when he 
reviewed the rebel army on Torwood Moor, near Stirling, a little before 
the battle of Falkirk. On the day of the battle of Falkirk I saw 
prisoner reconnoitring the King's troops after the rebel army had crossed 
the Ford of Dunnipace, near Falkirk, and was marching to attack the 
army under General Hawley. At Inverness, two days before the battle 
of Culloden, whilst in possession of the rebels, I saw the prisoner there 
on foot walking in the streets. The prisoner was a very active man in 
the rebel army, and was looked upon to be one of the best disciplined 
officers in it. 

ALLAN STUART, No. 30. I know the prisoner very well, and he was 
aide-de-camp to Lord George Murray. I first saw him in Edinburgh 
with the rebels before the battle of Prestonpans, and the night before the 
said battle he went to reconnoitre the King's troops under General Cope, 



3 DEPOSITIONS- AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

and brought word that there was a deep ditch in front of the King's 
troops, and that therefore they could not be attacked. That when the 
army under General Cope gave way, the prisoner was along with the 
rebels in pursuit of the King's troops on horseback, and with the rebel 
army in all their marches. He was in England, particularly upon the 
march from Manchester to Carlisle. That whenever there was a halt 
anywhere the prisoner was always waiting at the Pretender's quarters for 
orders, and when Lord George Murray marched into Ross-shire, in order 
to pursue Lord Loudoun, the prisoner was along with a party of rebels 
sent for that purpose. That upon the retreat from Ross-shire to Dingwall 
witness spoke to Colonel Kerr, and had some conversation with him. 
Saw the prisoner at Inverness with the rebel army frequently, but did 
not observe how he was armed. At Inverness he heard the prisoner give 
an account of having surprised some of the Hessians between Blair and 
Dunkeld, saying he wished Ardshiel's regiment had been with him, 
because he knew that regiment would obey orders, whereas the High- 
landers that were with him fired too soon upon the Hessians, and had 
not suffered them to advance far enough. When the rebel army gave 
way at Culloden I saw the prisoner on horseback with his sword drawn, 
with a short coat on, and a bonnet, calling out to the rebels to rally. 
Prisoner had the reputation of being a very good officer, and was very 
active and vigilant in the Pretender's son's service. 

WALTER SCOTT, No. 51. I frequently saw the prisoner in Edinburgh 
when the rebels were there, dressed in English clothes, armed with a 
broadsword, white cockade in his hat, and pistols before him when he 
rode. Saw him very often at Holyrood House, where the Pretender's son 
kept his Court, acting as one of the Pretender's aide-de-camps by giving 
orders from the Pretender's son, going with the same and returning to 
Ilolyrood House, and continued in that position during all the time the 
prisoner continued at Edinburgh. 

Capt. CAMPBELL, No. 52. Testifies as to prisoner's appearance at 
Edinburgh, and says he once saw him in the Pretender's drawing room 
in Holyrood House writing. 

JAMES GRANT, No. 54. Saw the prisoner with the rebels in England 
and Scotland 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACO15ITE TRIALS. 389 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner told them he was aide- 
de-camp to the Pretender. 

WM. CLARK. Saw the prisoner with the rebels at Elphinstonpans, 
near Stirling, with the rebel Life Guards, also at Preston and Glasgow. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. Saw prisoner at Carlisle, Derby, battle of 
Falkirk where he was aide-de-camp and afterwards at Fochabers, 
Elgin, and battle of Culloden, armed with a broadsword, and wearing 
white cockade. 

ALEX. RUSSEL ; JOHN FALCONER ; FRANCIS CHALMERS. All bear 
witness to prisoner's presence in rebel army. 

Mr. CHAS. LESLIE. Saw him at Edinburgh in October, 1745, with 
the rebels, armed as aforesaid. Saw him act as postmaster and inspect 
the letters of the post office. 

ANDREW GIBSON ; WM. WILSON ; DAVID BELL. These bear witness 
as to the prisoner's presence at various places with the rebels. 

[Information laid at Inverness Found guilty, but reprieved^ 



ALEXANDER MACGROUTHER, JUNIOR. 

JOHN ALLAN, No. 2. The defendant was a lieutenant in the Uuke 
of Perth's regiment, and marched with the rebel army to Carlisle, and 
was at his post in the trenches before the town when it was besieged by 
the rebels. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK. When the town and castle of Carlisle 
were besieged by the Duke, defendant mounted guard as an officer in 
garrison in defence of the place, being armed with a firelock, broadsword 
and pistols between the 2Oth and 3Oth. 

DAN. McFARLAN, Xo. 15. The defendant marched with the rebel 
army from Dalkeith to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols, as a 
lieutenant in the regiment called the Duke of Perth's, and witness saw 
him again among the rebels in Carlisle the day they marched into it, &c. 
(as above). 



390 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Y. HUGH McDouGALL, No. 60 ; C. ALEX. REACH, No. 91 ; C. JOHN 
OGILVY, No. 89; C. THOS. CHALMERS, No. 31 ; L. WM. MAGGEE, No. 7; 
La. ISABEL CAMPBELL, No. 72 ; L. ARCH. LAUDER, No. 131. All these 
witnesses testify to defendant's presence with the rebels as an officer in 
England, and in the defence of Carlisle against the Duke of Cumberland. 

WILLIAM McGHlE. Saw the prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh, 
armed with sword and pistols, and upon the march with the Duke of 
Perth's regiment to Carlisle, drawing up the rebel soldiers there, and in 
arms. 

[Prisoner died before trial.] 



CHARLES G OR DON. 

JOHN VERE. I was in Carlisle when it was besieged by the 
Duke, and the defendant was an officer in the rebel service, in garrison 
there, and did duty as such in defence of the place against the King's 
forces, being armed with sword and pistol. 

JOHN URQUHART, No. 105. I was a private man in the 
garrison of Carlisle when it was besieged by the Duke. Defendant was 
a lieutenant in the Pretender's service, and was left in garrison there by 
the rebels when they marched into Scotland. He did duty as an officer 
in defence of the place when it was besieged by the Duke, being armed 
as aforesaid. 

C. THOMAS CHALMERS, No. 31 ; C.JOHN OGILVV, No. 89 ; C. ALEX. 
FORBES, No. 47 ; C. JOHN FRASER, No. 48 ; WM. MAGGEE, No. 7. 
These testify as to prisoner's presence in Carlisle defending the place 
against the King's troops. 

WM. WILLS, No. no. I saw the cannon fired from the castle of 
Carlisle upon the King's forces, and defendant was then in the castle 
among the rest of the rebel officers. He always appeared to be, was 
called, and acted as an officer in Carlisle. 

ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125. I saw defendant walking about the ramparts 
of the castle of Carlisle, observing that the sentinels did their duty. 
Whilst the rebel army was in England he was called, and appeared, as 
an officer left in garrison there by the rebels. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 391 

WM. McGHlE. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh, 
armed with sword and pistols, marching with Lord Ogilvy's regiment 
towards Carlisle, and afterwards in the castle of Carlisle, drawing up the 
rebel soldiers there, and upon duty. 

SAM. MADDOCK. I saw prisoner present at a court martial. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. Gordon a young man of well affected family. His father 
protested against the rebels, and was imprisoned for it. His eldest 
brother was with Cope. Was not trusted to guard the Scotch gate, at 
which only he could escape. Force a good plea, if extended for ever. 
Lord Hale don't say on which side the continuance of force should be 
shewn. We prove it originally, let them take it off. No distinction in 
the degree of high treason. Don't appeal to reason for their conduct in 
trusting him, for they never acted reasonably. As an officer he was more 
under their eye, being all the while in a garrison town so the force 
continued. 

Mr. JODDREL. His father, in 1715, was on the side of the Government. 

JAMES WATT. The elder brother went with Cope. Prisoner went 
to the fair with his father's cattle, and was then seized by Glcnbuckct. 
Prisoner said he knew no other King but King George, and three took 
him. His father offered money, and Glenbucket said he wanted men 
and not money, and damned him. He is 17 years of age. The father 
imprisoned in November for a protestation against Glenbucket for 
meddling with the Duke of Gordon's men, he being his bailif of regalities. 
He was carried on Hussars' saddle, surrounded by 40. No cattle taken 
or house burnt. 

JOHN SLORACH. I went with him (prisoner) to sell the cattle. Glen- 
bucket's son told him prisoner was to serve the King. What King? 
King James ? I know no King but King George. I went and told the 
father, and he said perdition catch the old villain. His sisters cried. 

JAMES RENNY. He was brought into Banff on bare horse and 
guarded. He had no arms, and was so carried out next day. 



392 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

ANNE GRAHAM. Quartered at the Grapes, and paid for everything 
he had, and behaved civily. The Scotch gate walled up. 

The PRISONER. My heart was never along with them. 

Chief-Justice LEE. It is incumbent on prisoner to shew the con- 
tinuance of force stronger against them with respect to being trusted as 
officers. 

\Gtiilty. Recommended on account of his yoiitli. Reprieved^ 



ALEXANDER MACLAUCIILAN, MAJOR. 

ALLAN STEWART, No. 36. The first time I saw the prisoner with 
the rebels was as he went from Edinburgh to Haddington and Dunbar, 
to raise the cess in these places for the rebel army. The prisoner, who 
was called Major, went with a party upon that occasion, mounted upon a 
fine brown stallion, dressed in highland clothes. The cess was raised by 
the party with which prisoner marched in this expedition, but whether in 
going or returning I saw prisoner with said party at Musselburgh, within 
3 or 4 miles of Edinburgh. I saw prisoner with the rebel army at 
Inverness walking in the streets dressed in a highland dress, with his 
sword, 6 or 7 days before the battle of Culloden. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 45. [Deserted by staying to have his 
horse shod.] The first time I saw the prisoner with the rebels was at 
Edinburgh whilst in their possession after the battle of Prestonpans, and 
he was dressed in highland dress, and wore a broadsword. Saw him 
afterwards with the rebels at Pennycook, about 8 miles from Edinburgh, 
the first night of the march towards England, dressed and armed as 
aforesaid. The night before the engagement at Culloden, when the 
rebel army was drawn up upon Culloden Moor in expectation of the 
Duke of Cumberland's army, I saw the prisoner upon the said Moor, 
dressed and armed as aforesaid, but don't know what corps he belonged to. 

Capt. CAMPBELL, No. 52 ; THOS. ARMSTRONG. Testify to prisoner's 
appearance in the rebel army. The last named saw him in highland 
dress with the rebels at Fochabers, and acted as a van officer in that army. 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 393 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. After his surrender the prisoner gave 
to them his name and title as Major in Tullibardine's regiment. 

ALEXANDER RUSSEL. Prisoner was Major in a regiment of the 
Stewarts in the rebel army, and was with them at Edinburgh and 
Duddingston, armed with a broadsword and pistols, and sometimes with 
a blunderbuss, in highland dress and white cockade. 

JOHN FALCONER. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Glasgow and 
Elgin, armed and dressed as above. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. He retired to Alex. MacLauchlan's house, a friend of 
the Government, and (was) there seized. Called himself an officer to be 
better used. On return of the rebels he quitted his house with his wife, 
and went in a boat for Isle of Skye, where wife's relations lived. Ship- 
wrecked on the way, and had bloody flux marched back to his own 
house, where in April was surprised by the rebels Macleans. 

ALEX. McMASTER. Witness was servant to the prisoner. Messages 
came in August, 1745, from Lochiel prisoner went away to Lochicl. 
Returned in 3 days and went out again the same night, but did not tell 
whither. I did not see him again till November, and then at his own 
house, and he stayed all winter and part of the spring till March ; then I 
and other three lads went with him and his wife in a boat in order to go 
to Isle of Skye bad weather put us in at Arisaig lay 14 days sick 
boat stolen. Returned home on foot 25 miles stayed 4 or 5 days at 
home, when party came and took him away about 80 armed. Prisoner 
had no arms and went unwillingly. He was then ill. They carried him 
eastward, where Inverness lies. The boat had 4 oars and small sail. 
The other three were not prisoner's servants, but cottagers and a pedlar. 
He had two other servants who tended cattle. The names of those 
present when master taken were : Hugh Kennedy, John Mackenzie, 
Dougal McMartin, Hugh McClocklan. The 12 rebels came into the 
house in night time in hinder part stayed an hour. When daylight 
they forced the door open all family in bed. Thinks the bar was forced 
open with a pole that stood by saw him taken in his bed. No part of 

A 2 



394 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

rebel army came near in the retreat. Four maids and two men servants 
and I lay in the house when surprised. 

LACHLAN Dow. Witness is servant to Allan MacLauchlan in 
Argyleshire, 30 miles from prisoner's house. It was in August prisoner 
came and stayed 24 days. We had orders to deny him. Then the laird 
of MacLauchlan surrounded the house in the night by 30 men armed. 
The laird said it was to find prisoner, and would search, and found him. 
Guarded him till light, and then carried him away against his will. 

DONALD MUNRO. Prisoner was sick after Culloden handcuffed and 
striped, and wrapped in blankets. 

{Information laid at tlie toivn of Inverness Guilty, but reprieved.} 
ALLAN CAMERON. 

ALLEN STEWART, No. 37. I remember to have seen prisoner 
marching along with the rebel army, habited always in highland clothes, 
but cannot tell any particular place where I saw him. 

Capt. CAMPBELL, No. 52. I know Allan Cameron very well : he was 
captain in Lochiel's regiment. I frequently saw him along with the rebels 
at Edinburgh, when they were there, armed with broadsword, pistols and 
dirk, in highland dress. This Cameron was several nights in this witness's 
house at Edinburgh during the aforesaid time, and told this witness that 
he commanded a company in Lochiel's regiment. Saw him one night 
when he was an officer of the rebel guard in the guard house in Streight 
Bow. Another night I saw prisoner in company with Lord George 
Murray in the Lawn Market, when it was said the rebels were going to 
make an attack on the castle. 

JAMES PARKER. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Stirling after 
the battle of Falkirk, dressed in the highland dress, white cockade, and 
armed with a broadsword. Saw him afterwards with the rebels at Crieff 
and Aberfeldy ; at Ruthven in Badenoch ; at Lochaber, and at the siege 
of Fort William. Afterwards at Inverness, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 
The prisoner was an officer of Lochiel's regiment, and was drawn up and 
reviewed at Inverness by the colonel before the battle of Culloden. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 395 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. These gentlemen were appointed by 
his Royal Highness to take an account of the rebel officers taken at the 
battle of Culloden, and, upon examination, the prisoner told them he was 
a captain in Lochiel's regiment. 

WILLIAM CLARK. Defendant was a captain in Lochiel's regiment in 
the rebel army, and was afterwards a captain in the Artillery, with which 
he marched to the attack of Inverness, Fort Augustus, and Fort William, 
armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

ALEX. RUSSEL. I saw prisoner mount guard at the Abbey, Edinburgh, 
armed with a fuzee, sword and pistols, dressed in the highland dress and 
white cockade. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. Prisoner has wife and 10 children. Tenant of Lochiel, 
who summoned all in prisoner refused rights of superior always 
absolute. He was always guarded. 

ALEX. CAMERON of King George's Guards. [This witness was not 
examined, as the prosecution opposed his examination to prove Lochiel's 
power, as the court said it was improper.] 

NlEL MAcMiLLAN. I saw prisoner at Lochiel's house in August, 
September, 1745, and Lochiel said he must go and join the Prince. He 
refused, and Lochiel took and ordered him to be confined, and I saw him 
come towards prison. 23rd August at Mawie saw him amongst 50 people 
with arms, but prisoner had none. They said it was because he refused 
to join. Four days after I, returning with my horses, met a party guarding 
prisoner. In April last first saw prisoner amongst 100, and one going 
behind him held a rope. They said he had deserted so often he would be 
put to death, and they should have no more trouble with him. This was 
one mile and half from Fort William. Did not see him in the intermediate 
time. This was two or three days after the siege of Fort William, going 
towards Inverness. Prisoner was within 7 miles of Fort William. Has 
wife and 10 children. 

DONALD MACPHERSON. Beginning of August, 1745, I was at 
Lochiel's. I keep horses near Fort William. Went to demand a debt 



396 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

of Ewen Cameron. Saw 7 men take him out of prison, and lead him to 
Lochiel's house. I followed. In going the officer told prisoner if he did 
not join the Prince, Lochiel would hang him. Prisoner answered he 
might do so, but if he had an equal force with Lochiel, he would prevent 
Lochiel's going into the rebellion. On 22nd and 23rd I saw him at 
Mawies surrounded, and, without arms, put into a barn with two sentinels 
with drawn swords. 4th or Jth September I saw him as I carried my 
horses from Perth, with 24 men bringing him to Perth. MacMillan and 
I were bringing back our horses. He had no arms. In April saw him 
amongst 100, and one had a rope, within a mile and half of Fort William. 
Saw him as I stood at my own door. 

[Information laid at city of EdinburgJi Giiilty, but reprieved^ 



JOHN BURNETT. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK ; THOS. CHALMERS, No. 31; JOHN 
FRAZER, No. 48 ; ALEX. FORBES, No. 47. These witnesses say that 
defendant was one of the rebel officers in garrison in Carlisle a captain 
in the rebel train of Artillery and did duty as such in Carlisle (when 
the same was besieged by the Duke), armed with a sword and pistol. 

AUSTIN COLEMAN, No. 34. Witness wheeled sods to repair a 
battery in the castle of Carlisle, where the defendant commanded, and 
when the Duke's forces appeared upon a hill about half-a-mile from 
Carlisle, defendant fired the first cannon at them from the English port 
in Carlisle. 

ALEX. REACH, No. 91 ; JOHN URQUHART, No. 105 ; JOHN OGILVIE, 
No. 89. These witnesses testify to defendant's presence in Carlisle when 
besieged by the Duke. 

JOHN ALLEN, No. 2; WM. WILLS, No. no. These witnesses were 
in the castle of Carlisle when the cannon were fired from thence upon the 
Duke's army, and then the defendant was there amongst the rest of the 
rebel officers. Saw him at that time upon the ramparts assisting several 
times in pointing the guns which were fired upon the Duke's army. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 397 

WM. MAGGEE, No. 7. Testifies as above, and says defendant paid 
some of the soldiers of his company in Carlisle during the said siege. 

ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125. I saw the cannon fired from the castle of 
Carlisle upon the Duke's army, and the defendant upon the ramparts, 
and heard him give directions to the gunners several times for fixing the 
guns. 

ARCH. LAUDER, No. 131. I saw defendant assisting in levelling the 
cannon upon the King's army, and I received 7d. a day during the time 
I was in Carlisle from defendant as my officer. 

JOHN WHITE, No. 109 ; JOHN WILLIAMSON ; CHARLES HENDKY ; 
THOMAS GORDON ; JOHN MACKINSON ; Mr. CHARLES LESLIE. All 
these witnesses testify as to prisoner's presence with the rebel army, 
armed with sword and pistols, in highland clothes, with white cockade, &c. 

ROGER MACDONALD. Saw prisoner several times with the rebel 
Artillery, in the retreat towards Carlisle, both on horse and foot. 

ALLAN STEWART. I saw him a few days after the battle of Preston- 
pans firing the cannon taken from General Cope at a mark at Holyrood 
House ; and I also saw him on the march with the rebel Artillery on the 
way to England, but knows not at what particular place nor what arms 
he carried. 

THOMAS DRAKE. I saw the prisoner at Derby armed with a broad- 
sword, and a belt over his shoulder. 

WILLIAM McGHlE. I saw him at Edinburgh, armed with a sword, 
when the Pretender was proclaimed ; at the rebel's camp at Duddingston 
with sword and pistols ; upon the march with the rebel Artillery to 
Carlisle ; drawing up the rebel soldiers, and upon guard, and busy among 
the cannon when they were firing upon the Duke's army. 

JOHN DAVISON. I saw defendant with the rebel officers in Carlisle, 
when the rebels marched away to Scotland. 

FOA' THE DEFENCE. 

PRISONER. I was taken prisoner by Glenbucket and forced. Offers 
a certificate of his character, which rejected, there being no oath. 



398 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

THOMAS SHAW. Glenbucket came to the prisoner's house, who had 
fled, but was found at Kildrummy by 40, and taken away with drawn 
swords and bound. It was because he and others dissuaded the country 
people from rising about the middle of September. Was esteemed well 
affected to the Government. ' 

JOHN MILLS. I heard him lament his being forced to fly from his 
house. He had been in the King's army before, and that made them 
more desirous to get him. 

[Found guilty, but reprieved.} 



JAMES STORM ONTH. 

WILLIAM FUDD. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Stirling 
before the battle of Falkirk with a white cockade in his hat, and saw him 
on the day of the battle of Falkirk marching up on foot along with 
Ogilvie's first battalion to the battle, and carrying the colours there, and 
soon after the engagement began I saw the prisoner running away from 
the battle, having dropped the colours, whereupon Lord Ogilvie cried out, 
" My colours are gone," and witness saw Major Glascoe take them up. 
I saw the prisoner marching along with the said battalion to Perth, and 
saw him there with them 

JOHN DOGE. I saw the prisoner at Stirling, after the battle of 
Falkirk, in highland dress, with a sword by his side and a white cockade 
in his hat, walking up and down with other rebel officers. He was called 
a lieutenant in the first battalion of Lord Ogilvie's regiment. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. These gentlemen were appointed by 
his Royal Highness to take an account of the rebel officers taken at, or 
surrendered to the King's forces, after the battle of Culloden, and the 
prisoner told them he was an ensign in Lord Ogilvie's regiment. 

WM. WILLS. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Leith in October, 
1745, soon after the battle of Prestonpans, armed with a broadsword, and 
he had a white cockade in his bonnet. He was called a captain in Lord 
Ogilvie's regiment. He marched with the rebels to Carlisle. I saw him 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 399 

every day upon the said march, and particularly at Moffat and Riccarby, 
near Carlisle, along with said regiment, during the siege of that place by 
the rebels. 

JOHN REACH. I saw him at Leith and Edinburgh, armed and 
dressed as aforesaid. 

JOHN WILLIAMSON. I knew him to be an officer in Lord Ogilvie's 
regiment, and saw him upon the march with them to Carlisle, armed and 
dressed as forsaid, sometimes with a jockey coat over them. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

THOMAS STARK. Prisoner came back 8 or 10 days before the retreat 
from Stirling. Resided in Aberdeen (?) in March. He sent to the sheriff 
and minister he was ill to surrender. He went, and they came in the 
afternoon, and he said, As I surrender to you I shall be at your call when 
you please. He stayed till Hessians apprehended him. Living on 1000 
merks on his own wife's estate. 

Mr. BRUCE. Reclaimed as a gentleman since married, but a queer 
man before. 

\_Found Guilty.] 



Memorandum James Stormontk's Case. He was one of the rebel 
prisoners at whose trial such favourable circumstances appeared, that 
Lord Chief Justice Wills wrote in his favour to the Duke of Newcastle : 
when he was brought out of prison into a messenger's house His 
Grace the Duke of Argyle spoke to the Duke of Newcastle about 
him, who in his presence sent for Mr. Stone to know if what was 
said in the said James Stormonth's favour was true, which Mr. Stone 
assured his Grace that it was, upon which his Grace was pleased 
to order Mr. Stone to mark him down for a free pardon ; but the 
hurry he was in going abroad with his Majesty, and Mr. Ramsden (to 
whom Mr. Stone was so good to recommend it) going soon afterwards 
with the Duke of Newcastle, those in the office either did not know or 
forgot it, so that when the Regents met to determine the prisoners' fate, 



400 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

James Stormonth was in the list of those to be transported to the 
plantations for life. 

The Duke of Argyle told the Regents what had passed betwixt the 
Duke of Newcastle and him about said James Stormonth, and the Duke 
of Bedford was to write to his Grace about it ; meantime his name was 
scratched out of that list, and his fate is not as yet determined, to the 
great detriment of the poor man, who has little or nothing to support him. 



CHARLES OLIPHANT. 

JOHN FARQUHAR, a groom. I know the prisoner was acting and 
aiding in the rebellion, and saw him in arms with the rebels at Bannock- 
burn and several other places. 

JAMES DRUMMOND. The prisoner was called lieutenant in Lord 
John Drummond's regiment, and was with the rebels at Montrose, then 
in Lowland clothes. Saw him with them at Fort Augustus in highland 
clothes, armed with a fuzee and sword. Saw him drawn upon Culloden 
Moor with the rebels the evening before the battle. 

JOHN Low, servant to Lieut. Kerr. I will prove that the prisoner 
was a lieutenant, and that I saw him drawn up on the moor near Culloden 
on the day of the battle along with the rebel army ; also at Montrose, 
Perth, Stirling, Fort Augustus and Inverness, armed as aforesaid. 

ANDREW ROBERTSON. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at 
Fochabers and Elgin in Moray when the rebel army, and particularly 
Lord John Murray's regiment, lay there, and were in possession of those 
places, and the prisoner wore the uniform of Lord John Drummond's 
officers, viz : short blue coats, red vests laced, with bonnets and white 
cockades. 

JOHN DUCKWORTH ; DONALD CHISHOLM. These witnesses saw the 
prisoner at Montrose, Falkirk, Stirling, Aberdeen, Fochabers and Inverness. 
He had a sword and pike, and was called a lieutenant in Lord John 
Drummond's regiment. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 401 

WM. McGHiE. I have known the prisoner twenty years. He was 
an officer in the Excise at Aberdeen, and afterwards at Inverness till the 
rebellion broke out. Saw him at Holyrood House with the rebels in 
October, 1745, with a small sword by his side and a white cockade in his 
hat, and he was then waiting until Lord John Drummond's regiment 
should come over, and he was then to have a commission. 

THOMAS HENDERSON. I saw him at Fort Augustus with the rebels 
the beginning of April last. He was then delivering out brogues, or 
shoes, to the men there. Saw him afterwards at the head of his company 
at Inverness, armed with sword and gun. Saw him drawn up on Culloclen 
Moor the day of the battle. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner upon his examination 
at Inverness told these gentlemen he was a lieutenant in Lord John 
Drummond's regiment. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. A servant to Lord Lyon. Looked upon as a spy and 
imprisoned in Aberdeen until Lord John Drummond's regiment came, 
and pressed him into the service, or else be hanged. The King's 
witnesses contradict each other. 

Mr. MORTON. Compulsion agreed to be a defence if continued, 
which shall be shewn. 

WM. VASS. In November, 1745, I saw him in guard room at 
Aberdeen a prisoner. Heard he was to be hanged as a spy. Was 
guarded on the march to Montrosc. W r ore a blue coat and laced waist- 
coat and hat when in Lord Lyon's service, which he left 7 years ago. 

JAMES WILSON. Keeps a public house at Aberdeen. Charged as a 
spy and put into the guard. Saw him afterwards at liberty, and he 
wanted me to get him a horse to go to Dundee, which I could not. This 
was after the retreat from Stirling. 

[Found guilty.} 
15 2 



402 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

HENRY AND ROBERT MOIR. 

DAVID BELL, drummer to same troop. The prisoners were both 
private men in Lord Balmerino's troop of the Pretender's son's Life 
Guards, and I saw them all the way upon the retreat with the rebel army 
from Derby back to Scotland. Saw them drawn up with the troop and 
reviewed by the young Pretender at Glasgow ; and saw them both drawn 
up with the troop at the battle of Falkirk, sword in hand. Afterwards 
saw them drawn up on Culloden Moor with the troop the day of the 
battle there. 

EDWARD GIBSON, private man of same troop. Corroborates above. 
I first saw them at Manchester on the march to Derby, and afterwards 
all the way in the retreat to Scotland, and particularly at the review at 
Glasgow. They wore the uniform of said Life Guards, and were armed 
with sword and pistols. 

JOHN BAPTIST TROMENT. Corroborates above. 

[Found guilty.] 

ALEXANDER MACKENZIE OF CORIE. 

HECTOR CAMPBELL. I saw the prisoner in April last, at Thurso in 
Caithness, with about 2 or 300 men of Lord Cromartie's regiment. He 
was dressed in highland clothes, and was armed with a broadsword and 
pistols, being esteemed one of the officers of that regiment. Saw him at 
the guard room in Thurso putting the men in order, and acting as an 
officer in command. 

GEORGE SINCLAIR. I saw the prisoner in arms at Thurso in Caithness 
with Lord Macleod's men. Lord Macleod forced witness to attend the 
said Corie as a guide into the parishes of Wick and Canesbie in Caithness, 
whither the prisoner went to warn the inhabitants of the said parishes to 
send their cess and men by a certain day to Thurso ; to which parishes 
and on which errand the witness attended the prisoner, and returned with 
him to Thurso. Marched afterwards with him to Dunrobin, where I saw 
him deliver up his arms to Lord Sutherland's men. 



IMPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 403 

DONALD MUNUO. The prisoner was factor to Lord Cromartie, Saw 
him with Lord Cromartie's regiment at Strathpeffer in the shire of Ross, 
and he marched from thence to Perth armed with a broadsword and 
pistols. He was called a lieutenant in that regiment, and I saw him 
afterwards in the march from Perth to Stirling armed as aforesaid. Saw 
him the morning of the battle of Falkirk at Bannockburn drawn up for 
the march to Falkirk ; saw him four days after the battle at Bannockburn, 
and upon the march from thence to Aberdeen, every day. Saw him with 
the said regiment at Thurso in Caithness, and at Dunrobin with Lord 
Cromartie and his officers. He kept back several. Ardlow and 
Keppoch offered him a lieutenancy, and said he would not join the 
army and act only as a servant. Heard officers advise them to give 
in as officers to be better used. 

HUGH ROSS. Prisoner was an officer in Lord Cromartie's regiment 
in the rebel army, and was with them at Perth. I afterwards saw him 
march up with the rebels to the battle of Falkirk, armed with broadsword 
and pistols. 

HENRY EDWARDS. I saw prisoner with Lord Cromartie's regiment 
at Perth, when the rebels were in possession of those places, and he was 
called an officer, and did duty as such. Was dressed in highland clothes, 
with white cockade, armed with sword and pistols. He rescued me, and 
gave me good information. He reviewed their firelocks. Lord Cromartie 
was not there then. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner, upon his examination at 
Inverness, told these gentlemen he was factor to Lord Cromartie, and 
lieutenant in his regiment. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. FORD. Owing to obedience to his master, a local tyrant. Good 
principles usual arms. Representing himself as an officer only for 
favour. Went only to Perth to sell cattle. Refused lieutenancy to 
A[rdlow] and K[eppoch], 



404 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Mr. ROBINSON. I knew him seven years. Gatherer of Lord C.'s 
rent. In October, 1745, he drove out black cattle to Beauly, but they 
came back. Drove them out of the way for fear of A[rdlow] and 
Kfeppoch]. Said it was his misfortune to be factor, else he could have 
excused himself, but he would keep to his business and not meddle with 
the army. Saw him again in March when he came to collect feu-duties 
for Lord C. They called him a treacherous rascal to his master ever 
since the rebellion began. Those were his words. He found my servant, 
but he was taken away again. Always against the rebels. 

JOHN CAMPBELL, Esq., Collector of Customs in Robinson's Parish. 
He appeared well affected to the Government ; advised me to leave the 
country for fear of insurrection, as friendship to me and Government. 
In 1738 he discovered an intended fraud. 

CHARLES JAMES LEE. If ever acted as officer, soldier in giving 
assistance. If a driver of cattle for service of rebel army, need not also 
be proved to act as soldier, while if acted only as a mere seller of cattle. 

[Found guilty.] 



GEORGE LAW, THE PARSON. 

ALEXANDER SMITH. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Fochabers, 
and along with them on the march from Speyside to Elgin on horseback, 
where I saw him several times. Saw him afterwards with the rebels at 
Nairn, and several times wearing a white cockade. He always wore a 
hat, and he was seldom without a white cockade in it. Reported to be 
chaplain to the Aberdeenshire squadron of rebels. 

HUGH Ross. I saw him riding with some of the rebels between 
Fochabers and Elgin, at which last place I several times saw the prisoner 
along with the rebels. He was dressed in black clothes, but never saw 
him with arms or wear any cockade. 

JAMES CHARLES, an Aberdeen tailor, of Stonywood's regiment. 
I have known the prisoner many years, and on or about the 2Oth of 
February last heard him preach at Aberdeen to a congregation mostly of 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 405 

rebels, and then and there heard him pray for the Pretender, and for 
success to his arms under His Royal Highness Prince Charles Prince 
Regent. I saw the prisoner march from Aberdeen with Stonywood's 
regiment, with a white cockade in his hat. He was reputed to be, and 
witness believes he was, chaplain to the said regiment. His own son 
went with him from Aberdeen wore a white cockade and a small sword, 
and marched with Stonywood's regiment. Thomas Scott, the prisoner's 
stepson, was an ensign in the said regiment. The prisoner warned the 
said regiment, when they lay at Fochabers, that he would preach there 
on a certain day then named, and desired their attendance. On a 
Sabbath day, two or three Sundays previous to the battle of Culloden, 
I heard the prisoner, in a meeting house at Fochabers (the congregation 
of which were mostly Jacobites), preach and pray for King James the 
Eight, and for success to his son Charles the Prince Regent's arms. 

JAMES DRUMMOND. I saw the prisoner ride out of Aberdeen in 
company with a quartermaster of Stonywood's, and along with that 
regiment armed with a sword by his side, and his son was with him 
with a white cockade in his hat, and a small sword by his side. I saw 
the prisoner and his son every day on the march with the said regiment 
until they arrived at Fochabers, and at night in company with the officers 
of said regiment, at their quarters on the said march. I heard the 
prisoner encouraging the men. 

DAVID STEWART. I saw the prisoner and his son at Fochabers and 
Elgin with the rebels. 

ROBERT BRUCE, of Crichton's regiment. I have known the prisoner 
many years. I heard and believe he attended Stonywood's regiment as 
chaplain, and marched everywhere with them. Saw him at Perth with 
the rebels when they lay there. 

JOHN INNES. Saw the prisoner with the rebel army at Turriff. 

JOHN MACDONALD ; ALEXANDER SHAND ; EDWARD SMITH. 
These witnesses, all of Fochabers and confined on suspicion only, prove 
that whilst the rebel army lay there the prisoner was seen by them every 
day in company with the rebel officers, and that he went with them at 
night to the Murray side of the Spey, where the rebels lay and retired to 
every night. 



406 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JAMES Ross, Sen. ; JAMES Ross, Jun. These witnesses prove the 
prisoner to be a minister of an non-juring church at Aberdeen before the 
rebellion. They saw him first at Banff with Stonywood's regiment, and 
he was reputed to be Stonywood's chaplain. Saw him several times with 
said regiment afterwards at Fochabers and Elgin. Never saw him upon 
the march, nor remember to have heard him preach or pray, or to have 
seen him wear any cockade. 

ALLAN STEWART. I remember to have heard the prisoner either 
preaching or praying to the rebels at Glasgow, but do not remember if 
it was for or about the Pretender's son. It was generally reputed the 
prisoner was one of the preachers in the rebel army, but I do not 
remember to have seen him anywhere in Scotland but at Glasgow. I 
saw him at Glasgow when the rebels were in possession of the place, and 
heard him preach in the Grammar School there to a congregation mostly 
composed of the rebel army. Knew his usual residence to be at Aberdeen, 
and heard and believe he followed the rebel army, and was with them in 
England ; particularly at Kendal, where I apprehend he preached in 
the evening of a Sunday, and that the curate of Kendal preached the 
same Sunday, in the afternoon, to a crowded audience, and that he was 
invited and did dine on that day with the young Pretender. That he 
went from thence with the rebel army. 

Capt EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner when examined at 
Inverness told them he was a non-juring minister, and was chaplain to 
Stonywood's regiment. 

ALEX. REACH. I saw prisoner in the beginning of November, 1745, 
at Dalkeith, with the rebels, when the Pretender's son was there. 

[Acquitted.} 



ADAM MAY. 

HUGH Ross. The prisoner was a private man in Lord Pitsligo's 
horse, and I first saw him at Aberdeen with the rebels armed with a 
broadsword. Saw him afterwards with them at Edinburgh, and afterwards 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 407 

upon the march with the rebels into England, particularly at Manchester 
and Derby. Saw him again at Stirling in the retreat, till which time he 
was in Pitsligo's horse. Saw him afterwards upon Culloden Moor drawn 
up there the day before the battle, when the rebel army was drawn up 
there, dressed in highland dress and armed with a broadsword, but what 
he then belonged to I cannot tell. 

JOHN SMART, servant to the prisoner. The prisoner went from 
Buchan in Aberdeenshire ; raised about 13 or 14 men, marched them to 
Fochabers, thence to Elgin, where he joined Stonywood's Regiment of 
Foot in the rebel army. He was then armed with a broadsword and 
pistols. Thence he marched with the regiment to Inverness, and the 
prisoner's men were at the battle of Culloden, but prisoner was at Inverness. 

JOHN COWIE. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Fochabers in 
their retreat northwards, and he was then called a captain in Stonywood's 
regiment, being dressed in highland clothes, and armed with sword and 
pistols. 

JAMES DONALDSON. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh. 
He was then in Lord Pitsligo's regiment, in highland dress, a white 
cockade in his hat, and armed with a broadsword. Saw him upon the 
march with the rebels into England, particularly at Derby and Carlisle, 
and back again almost every day. Saw him afterwards with the said 
regiment at Glasgow, Falkirk and Stirling, dressed and armed as 
aforesaid ; afterwards with the rebels at Aberdeen, Fochabers and Elgin. 

WALTER SCOTT. I frequently saw the prisoner at Edinburgh %vith 
the rebels when they were in possession of it, dressed in a highland habit, 
with a white cockade in his bonnet, a sword by his side, but does not 
know what commission he had. He was formerly a writer in Edinburgh. 

JOHN DRUMMOND. I saw the prisoner in arms with the rebels. He 
was one of the escort that attended the Duke of Perth from Preston. 

JAMES DAVIDSON, servant to Carnousie. I saw the prisoner in arms 
with the rebels at Manchester and several other places. 

DAVID STEWART. I saw him in tartan dress at Elgin with the rebels 
when they lay in that town. 



408 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

ALAN BOVIE, servant. I saw prisoner marching armed with the rebel 
army 4 miles from Manchester, dressed in tartan clothes and white cockade. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. These gentlemen were appointed by 
His Royal Highness to take an account of the rebel officers who were 
taken at or surrendered to the King's forces after the battle of Culloden. 
The prisoner then told them his name, and that he was a volunteer in the 
regiment called Pitsligo's, and afterwards in Stonywood's. 

[Guilty Recommended by t/ie Jmy-~\ 



ANDREW SPRULK. 

HUGH ROSS. The prisoner was a volunteer in Lord Pitsligo's horse 
in the rebel army, and I saw him with them at Manchester dressed in 
highland clothes, armed with a broadsword. He was drawn up with that 
regiment opposite the Pretender's lodgings in that town. Saw him 
frequently with said regiment on the march in Scotland, particularly at 
Glasgow. 

JAMES DONALDSON. The prisoner was a volunteer in the same 
regiment, and marched with it into and out of England. I saw him 
almost every day upon the march or in quarters. He was armed with a 
broadsword, and a pair of pistols before him. He marched with said 
regiment out of Manchester towards Derby, and I saw him afterwards 
with it at Elgin, in the shire of Murray, when it was broke. 

Capt. CAMPBELL. I saw the prisoner at Edinburgh when that place 
was in the rebels' possession. He wore a white cockade, and was armed 
with a broadsword, but I know nothing of his command or regiment. 

ALLAN STEWART. I saw prisoner in his boots, dressed in a highland 
coat, with a sword by his side, protecting Sir Michael Bruce's house, about 
two miles from Falkirk, from the fury of the highlanders, who would 
have plundered the same in revenge for Sir Michael's having raised a 
company of men for the Government. I dined with him there, and heard 
him declare he belonged to the horse in the rebel service, and that his 
errand to Sir Michael Bruce's was to protect his house. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 409 

JOHN MASON. I saw the prisoner in arms at Inverness with the rebels. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner told these gentlemen 
that he was a private man in Lord Pitsligo's horse. 

Mr. CHARLES LESLIE. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh 
in October, 1745. He was then armed with a broadsword, and wore a 
white cockade. 

WILLIAM MACGHIE. I saw him with the rebels at Edinburgh, and 
in Pitsligo's horse at Moffat, march into Carlisle with them, and in the 
retreat saw him march out north with them, armed with broadsword and 
pistols. 

[Acquitted by Mr. Attorney's consent^ 



WILLIAM MURRAY OF TAYMONT. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 25. I often saw William Murray of 
Taymont with the rebels at Holyrood House in Edinburgh, whilst the 
Pretender's son kept his court there, after the battle of Prestonpans, with 
a small sword by his side, and I am positive that in the march into 
England I saw the prisoner at several places, marching along with the 
rebel army on horseback, with pistols before him and small sword by his 
side. On the rebels' retreat out of England I saw the prisoner at supper 
with the Pretender's son at Carlisle, which was the same evening the 
action happened at Clifton Moor between the King's troops and the rebels. 
He was generally about the person of the Pretender's son, and I saw the 
prisoner at Inverness along with the rebels whilst that town was in their 
possession, before the battle of Culloden, on foot with his sword by his 
side. Once at Inverness I saw the prisoner at supper at the same table 
with the Pretender's son, Sir Thomas Sherridan and Sullivan. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 26. Testifies as above. The prisoner was 
dressed in a blue coat and a small sword by his side. I saw him with the 
rebels at Falkirk upon the retreat of the rebel army out of England. 
I saw him at Inverness before the battle of Culloden frequently, and 
particularly at the Pretender's son's lodgings several times in that town 
whilst the rebels kept possession of it. He constantly at Inverness wore 
his small sword by his side ; and, the day before the battle of Culloden, 

C 2 



410 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

I saw him walking in the rebel camp upon Cullodcn Moor with some 
rebel officers, and same day saw him returning to Culloden house on 
horseback from the camp the Pretender's son and several persons of 
distinction being at that time in company and returning together to 
Culloden house. 

ALLAN STEWART, No. 26. I saw the prisoner at Holyrood house 
after the battle of Prestonpans, when the Pretender's son kept his court 
there, with a small sword by his side and dressed in a blue coat. I 
frequently saw him at the Pretender's son's court at different places, 
dressed as aforesaid, particularly at Edinburgh and Inverness. Before 
the battle of Culloden I often saw prisoner dressed and armed along with 
the rebel army at Inverness. Saw him at dinner at the same table with 
the Pretender's son at Inverness, before the battle and at other places. 

JAMES SCOTT. I saw him at Edinburgh along with the rebel army, 
dressed in blue English clothes, and a small sword by his side. 

WILLIAM REED. Testifies as to prisoner's presence in the rebel army, 
but cannot recollect the particular places, nor what arms he had, or 
whether he wore a white cockade. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner told these gentlemen he 
was a volunteer in the Duke of Perth's regiment. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. Prisoner generally attended upon the Pre- 
tender's son at Edinburgh, and was in the habit of the Pretender's Life 
Guards. Wore a white cockade, and was armed with a broadsword and 
pistols when he rode, a small sword when he walked. He marched with 
the rebels from Edinburgh to Derby and back, and was at the battles of 
Falkirk and Culloden, and rode off with the Pretender's son. 

Mr. CHARLES LESLIE. I saw prisoner frequently with the rebels at 
the Abbey in October, 1745, dressed as aforesaid. 

DAVID BELL. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Bannockburn, both 
before and after the battle of Falkirk, and afterwards with them after the 
battle of Culloden, about six miles beyond Ruthven in Badenoch. 

[Information laid at Inverness Pleaded guilty ; no judgment pronounced^ 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 411 



JOHN MACKENZIE, COMMONLY CALLED LORD MACLEOD, 

DONALD MUNRO, No. i ; DONALD ERASER, No. 2. These witnesses 
were private men in Lord Cromartie's regiment in the rebel army, and 
marched with the regiment to Perth in November last, at the head of 
which the prisoner marched with his father. Lord Cromarty was on 
horseback, with holsters before him. Saw him frequently among the 
rebels at Perth. From Perth the prisoner marched with the said regiment 
with a stand of colours to Dunblane, and some of the Camerons marched 
with them with colours and pipes. The prisoner marched with the 
regiment to Polmaises by Stirling. This regiment was engaged against 
the King's forces at Falkirk, and lost a man, prisoner being present with 
the regiment, but cannot tell whether he had arms or cockade. From 
Falkirk the prisoner marched with the regiment to Aberdeen and to 
Inverness, from whence they all went home. In March last the regiment 
was assembled again, and marched into Sutherland and Caithness, the 
prisoner along with them. They raised about thirty men, then came 
back, and most of them were taken prisoners at Dunrobin Castle Lord 
Sutherland's house by Lord Reay's men. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 9. In November last I saw the prisoner 
and his father come into Perth, on horseback, dressed in highland habits, 
pistols before them, and white cockades in their bonnets, which town was 
then governed by Lord Strathallan for the rebels. I saw them go into a 
room at Hickson's to several other rebel officers there. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 9. I saw the prisoner come into Stirling 
two days before the battle of Falkirk with his father's regiment and join 
the rebels there. The prisoner was then in arms, with a shoulder belt on, 
and a side pistol. I saw the prisoner talking there with the Pretender's 
son ; saw him with the Pretender's son when they reviewed the rebel 
army at Torwood Moor, near Stirling. 

HENRY EDWARDS, No. 21. In November last, when Lord Strath- 
allan was governor of the town of Perth for the rebels, the Mackenzies 
under Lord Cromartie came there. A few days after they came I saw 
the prisoner walking with his father in the streets of Perth, dressed in a 
highland habit, turned up and collared with green velvet, a broadsword 



412 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

under his arm, a pistol in his belt, and a white cockade in his bonnet. I 
frequently saw him with some of the rebel officers in the town of Perth 
when it was in possession of the rebels. 

JOHN HAY, No. 50. I twice saw the Lord Macleod along with the 
rebels in the town of Perth, when Lord Strathallan was governor for the 
rebels during the time the Pretender's son was in England. Lord 
Cromartie's regiment was at Perth at the same time Lord Cromartie 
with it. Lord Macleod at both the above times was dressed in a highland 
habit, with a white cockade. When Lord Cromartie's regiment was at 
Inverness on their way from the battle of Falkirk to return to their own 
country, I saw Lord Macleod at Inverness along with his father and the 
said regiment. 

JOHN GRAHAM, No. 4. I saw Lord Macleod at Inverness long before 
the battle of Culloden with the rebels on horseback. Saw Lord Macleod 
at Castle Downie before said battle, and he came thither to see the 
Master of Lovat, who happened to be from home at that time. There 
was a great intimacy between Lord Macleod and the Master of Lovat 

JOHN GRAY, No. 5 and n. I was forced into the Earl of Cromartie's 
service in March last, in which I continued about twenty days. Whilst 
in said regiment, it was in Sutherland and Caithness, I saw Lord Macleod 
with his father the Earl of Cromartie, but not in arms, particularly at 
Thurso in Caithness. He wore a white cockade, as the rest did ; and 
was taken with his father at Dunrobin Castle, into which the prisoner 
marched at the head of Lord Cromartie's men. 

WALTER Ross. Upon Saturday night, before the battle of Culloden 
Lord Macleod came to Lady Swiney's house (where this witness was a 
servant) in Reisgill in the parish of Latheron, in the shire of Caithness, 
with a large bag of money, a white cockade in his bonnet, and a pistol 
by his side, and some officers. The next morning I was forced away 
from said mistress's house by one Captain Mackenny ; carried to Laird 
of Latheron's house, from thence to the Castle of Dunbeath, and then to 
Dunrobin, where I was taken prisoner the Tuesday following. When I 
was carried to Dunrobin Lord Macleod rode before the men that were 
conducted thither. I believe Captain Mackenny forced me to go with 
him to Latheron by the directions and orders of Lord Macleod. I have 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 413 

seen the regiment called Lord Cromartie's regiment march through 
Caithness before I was forced from Lady Swiney's service, and Lord 
Macleod at the head of them, but don't remember that Lord Macleod 
was in arms, or had anything but a highland pistol in his hand. He 
marched at the head of the men into Dunrobin Castle. 

HUGH ROSS. I saw the prisoner at Perth with Lord Cromartie's 
regiment in highland clothes, white cockade, and a pistol by his side. 
Saw him afterwards with the said regiment at Bannockburn, and march 
at the head of it to the battle of Falkirk. Saw him in the retreat with 
the regiment to Aberdeen, and at Thurso in Caithness, and he was then 
called colonel of Lord Cromartie's regiment. 

HECTOR CAMPBELL. I saw prisoner at the head of two or three 
hundred men of Lord Cromartie's regiment at Thurso in Caithness, 
dressed in highland clothes, and a silver hilted sword ; and when said 
men marched back to Dunrobin the prisoner marched with them on 
horseback with pistols before. 

GEORGE SINCLAIR, and several others. These speak fully to the 
prisoner, but as he has given it under his hand he intends to plead guilty, 
we have not stated their evidence, and he acknowledged himself to be 
Lieut.-Col. of his father Lord Cromartie's regiment to Captain Eyre and 
Lieut. Moore, who examined him at Inverness. 

[Information laid at tJie town of Perth. Pleaded guilty no judgment 

pronounced^ 



ALEXANDER GRANT, BROTHER TO GLENMORISTON. 

THOMAS MACKAY. The prisoner served in the rebel army in Glen- 
garry's regiment, and was in arms with the rebels at Falkirk. 

JAMES GRANT. I saw him under arms with Glengarry's men who 
were in the rebellion at a place called Leadhill, near the Duke of 
Queensberry's, between Glasgow and Carlisle, in the retreat of the rebels 
from England. Also saw him often with the rebel army, and he always 
marched with Glengarry's men. 



414 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

DUNCAN GRANT. I saw him in arms with Glengarry's men at 
Edinburgh, Perth, Glasgow, and Stirling, and many other places, in 
highland dress, armed with sword and pistols. I was in same regiment 
with the prisoner. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told them at Inverness he 
was a private man in Glengarry's regiment. 

JOHN IJRQUHART. I saw him several times at Edinburgh after the 
battle of Prestonpans in highland dress, armed with broadsword and 
pistols. 

[Acquitted by Mr. Attorney's consent as coming in under the Duke's 

proclamation.] 



RODERICK MACKENZIE. 

DONALD MUNRO, No. i ; DONALD FRAZER, No. 8 ; Mr. JOHN 
MACKEY. These witnesses say that the prisoner marched from the 
first with Lord Cromartie's regiment to Perth, and was with it at the 
battle of Falkirk, being constantly with it everywhere else. He marched 
with said regiment into Caithness to raise men for the Pretender, and 
returned with it to Dunrobin Castle, where he was taken prisoner with 
Lord Cromartie. 

DUNCAN MACDONALD. The prisoner was an Ensign in Lord 
Cromartie's regiment, and mounted guard at Perth before the battle of 
Falkirk, dressed in highland clothes, a white cockade, and armed with 
sword and pistols. The prisoner and one Hector Mackenzie, another 
officer in said regiment, confined the witness one night at Perth on 
suspicion of his carrying letters from the King's army. 

HECTOR CAMPBELL. I saw prisoner with Cromartie's regiment when 
it was in Caithness, and often afterwards upon the march from thence to 
Dunrobin Castle in Sutherland. 

Capt EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told these gentlemen he was 
a Lieutenant in Lord Cromartie's regiment for five months. 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 415 

Lord Chief Justice WILLS. Not only necessary that the party have 
a will to get away, but he must also be at liberty to exert that will. 
If the force continues and there be no opportunity to desert, till the 
prisoner be taken, it will excuse. But, if an opportunity and that not 
taken, the original force will not excuse. Strictly it must be such a 
force as a man can't resist, and strictly a man ought to suffer death 
rather than run into a rebellion, but it would be hard to lay that down as 
a rule in all cases. Circumstances vary cases. All men have not the 
same degree of courage ; fear will work over some more than others. 

The Jury are not only to consider of the possibility of a man's 
escaping, but also the probability. Where doubtful the Jury ought to 
lean to the favourable side. It was through fear of losing his all, perhaps, 
that the poor man came to fetch his cattle back again. Every man was 
retaken that deserted at Falkirk. It might be through fear of being 
ironed that he made the bargain with Lord Cromartie for that temporary 
service that has been mentioned. 

{Information laid at town of Perth Not guilty.] 



ALEXANDER BUCHANAN. 

DONALD CHISHOLM. I first saw the prisoner with the rebels at 
Inverness the beginning of April last, and often saw the Duke of Perth's 
regiment marching up and down the streets of Inverness ; the prisoner 
along with it as an officer, dressed in highland clothes, and armed with a 
broadsword, pistols and target. I often saw that regiment reviewed 
there before the Duke of Perth's quarters, and at such reviews the 
prisoner always marched as an officer. Saw him marching at the head 
of a division of said regiment from Inverness towards Culloden Moor 
two days before the battle there. 

JAMES DRUMMOND. The latter end of March last, when the rebels 
were at Inverness, I several times saw prisoner marching along with a 
party of the Duke of Perth's regiment down to a green near the water 
side, where they used to exercise. The prisoner marched with them as 
an officer and was called the captain, and I have several times seen him 
with the rest of the officers before the said regiment upon said green, 



416 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

where they exercised, prisoner appearing as an officer, dressed in highland 
clothes, and armed with sword and target. The day before the battle of 
Culloden I saw the prisoner standing under arms as an officer in said 
regiment, which was then drawn out upon Culloden Moor with the rest 
of the rebel army in lines expecting the Duke of Cumberland. 

JAMES PARKER. Some days after the battle of Falkirk I saw the 
prisoner with the rebels at Stirling, and he was called a Captain in the 
Duke of Perth's regiment both by the officers and common men, dressed 
and armed as aforesaid. Saw him with the officers and a party of the 
Duke of Perth's regiment that changed the guard there, and it was 
generally reported among the rebels that the prisoner joined their army 
about the time of the battle of Falkirk. 

ROGER MACDONALD. Whilst the rebels were at Stirling I first saw 
the prisoner at Mrs. Young's, a public house there, in company and 
drinking with some French officers, and witness looked upon him as one 
who had joined the rebels. Prisoner was dressed in a highland habit, 
but I cannot recollect whether he carried arms or wore a white cockade. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner gave these gentlemen his 
name, and rank of a Captain in the Duke of Perth's regiment. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. An object of pity rather than resentment. 

JOHN BUCHANAN, 17 years old. Witness is a servant to his father, 
who lives in Perthshire. In September, 1745, a summons brought by 
Duke of Perth's officers and prisoner went, the father not being well. I 
went with him. Duke of Perth met us can't say what he said, but 
prisoner followed and lagged behind, and made signs to me to go back, 
and so we did. He said the Duke intended to carry him into rebellion, 
but he hoped he should not be obliged. Next morning I saw him, and 
for eight days he kept out, and only came of evenings for victuals, whilst 
he desired us to stand sentry. The father desired he should keep out of 
the way. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 417 

When the rebels left the country he came home. A fortnight after 
Prcstonpans they came back were surprised by a party two miles off 
his father's (Kilnahaig), where they were at Lime Quarry, and went into 
K to refresh. Captain Drummond commanded the party (30), and 
said, " Though you deserted before you are now my prisoner." They 
were armed with sword, dirk and pistols, and some guns. Carried him 
to the church of Calendar, within a mile of my father's. Father had 
word sent him and came. They drank, and I was ordered by prisoner to 
get father's horse ready, and he escaped and went home, and I behind 
him. The party were in two alehouses. Sent two servants and horses 
for father ; neither drunk or sober. Did not see him till two days after, 
but the lads said they brought him off that night. Next day an officer 
and 10 came to his father's and asked his mother for the son. She said 
" Not at home." He said he had orders from Duke of Perth to burn 
houses, destroy cattle, and hang these before their own doors. House 
searched but not found, for father and son were got to a Burnside by 
coals (sic). Absconded three days till rebels left the country. 

There came again four days after Xmas 40 with officers at daybreak, 
and brought out prisoner. Had no notice of them. They were armed, 
and he could not get from them, being surrounded. Prisoner when at 
Stirling sent word to father that he would give all to get away, and if he 
did he would not lye at home for quarter year. Desired a message to be 
sent that father was dangerous, in order to mollify, and get home. I 
went the next morning with such a message of his being at point of 
death. He applied for leave, but could not get it. Said he would try to 
escape, and did get over ferry, but guard carried us back to guard house. 
I, not being in highland clothes, was let go. They sent prisoner by boat, 
and told he was apprehended trying to escape. I went in another boat 
and overtook him, and he bade me tell his father that he would still 
escape, if opportunity. Was carried to his old quarters, and pushed in, 
and they took away his arms. This was about ist February. Used to 
wear highland clothes. No burning of house or destroying of cattle. 
Did not offer to apprehend me. The water was narrow. Believes he all 
the while intended to desert. 

MALCOLM MACLISH. Summons from Duke of Perth. Prisoner hid 
himself. Taken at Kilnahaig. Threats to burn, &c., for badness of 

D 2 



41 8 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

example. Spoke to Mr. Cuming, Sen., after Xmas, about carrying off 
prisoner ; three men and a boy. 



[Information laid at Inverness Not guilty. Tried iji/i Nov., 1746.] 



NICHOLAS GLASCOE, OF DILLON'S REGIMENT FRENCH SERVICE. 

ANDREW ROBINSON. I was servant to the prisoner, who was called 
Major Glascoe, and who marched with some French soldiers from Dundee 
to Stirling. The prisoner overtook upon that march the second battalion 
of Lord Ogilvie's regiment about five miles from Dundee, and marched 
with them to Stirling. The prisoner wore a short highland waistcoat and 
white cockade on said march, with pistols before him, and a sword by his 
side. I saw the prisoner march into Stirling with some French officers 
in the rebel service the day after the battle of Falkirk. The prisoner was 
upon the command at Keith the night that a party of the Duke of 
Kingston's horse was killed and taken. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 13. I saw prisoner in arms upon the march 
with the rebel army from Elgin in Murray towards Forres the day after 
the Light Horse were taken at Keith, dressed in highland clothes, white 
cockade, broadsword by his side, and a pair of pistols before him. I 
asked the prisoner "what news"; to which he replied, "Good news, we 
have taken twenty-nine or thirty of the King's forces at Keith, and this 
is one (the horse he rode on)," and that he, the prisoner, commanded the 
party that took them. I also saw him in arms marching with some of 
the rebels to the battle at Culloden Moor, and saw him there with them 
when drawn up on horseback, armed with sword and pistols, and a large 
white cockade. 

JAMES ROSS, No. 55. I saw prisoner three days together at Fochabers 
with Lord John Drummond, before the battle of Culloden, dressed and 
armed as aforesaid. 

LAWRENCE CLARK, No. 58. I first knew the prisoner in Dillon's 
regiment in France about fourteen years ago, and saw him at Fochabers 
two or three times while a party of the rebels lay there. 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 419 

ROGER MACDONALD. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Fochabers 
whilst General Bland and the King's forces lay at Strathbogie, armed 
and dressed as aforesaid. Saw him go out of Fochabers to patrol, 
with some other rebel officers, upon an alarm that the King's forces were 
coming up, on horseback and armed. Saw him with the rebels at Stirling 
when they besieged the castle. 

THOMAS ARMSTRONG. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Stirling 
after the battle of Falkirk. He was Major of Lord Ogilvie's second 
battalion, and was dressed in highland habit, &c, marching with the 
rebels through Perth, Aberdeen, and Fochabers, armed as aforesaid. 
Also with the rebel army when it was drawn up on Culloden Moor the 
day before the battle. 

ALEXANDER SMITH. Prisoner was Major of Lord Ogilvie's second 
battalion, and was with them at Stirling, Montrose, Dundee, Strathbogie, 
and Fochabers, armed and dressed as aforesaid. I saw him draw up said 
battalion on the young Pretender's birthday at Fochabers, and ride at 
their head, and order them to fire three times. He commanded, and they 
obeyed him as their officer. Saw him give money to a serjcant of said 
battalion to subsist some of the men. 

ROBERT NAIRN. I saw prisoner with said battalion at Montrose, and 
on the march from thence to Fochabers, dressed as aforesaid. 

WILLIAM FUDD. Prisoner was with the rebels at Stirling after 
Falkirk, dressed and armed, &c., also saw him with them from Stirling 
through Perth, Aberdeen, to Fochabers. 

ROBERT MACKEY. I saw him with the rebel army at Brechin in 
Angus, dressed, &c. From Brechin he marched with the second battalion 
of Ogilvie's regiment to Fochabers, Elgin and Nairn. 

COLIN THOM. Prisoner marched with said battalion from Auchter- 
arder to Dunblane, then to Stirling, then to Bannockburn, where they 
joined the rebel army. 

JOHN WILSON. I saw the prisoner ordering the batteries at Montrose 
by which the Hazard sloop was taken. Also marching with a party of 
the rebels who guarded the prisoners taken in said sloop, from Brechin to 
Arbroath. 



420 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JOHN COWIE ; JAMES SCOTT ; WALTER YOUNG ; ROBERT IRONS. 
These witnesses testify to prisoner's presence in the rebel army, armed 
and dressed as aforesaid, at Fochabers, Keith, Montrose, Stirling, Perth, 
Aberdeen, Meldrum, and Culloden Moor. 

ALLAN BOWIE, servant to Harry Patullo. Witness saw Nicholas 
Glasgoe draw up Lord Ogilvie's second battalion, place himself at their 
head, and exercise them at Fochabers on a certain day, when his master, 
Harry Patullo, commissary-general, mustered said battalion. 

JOHN MACDONALD ; ALEX. SHAND ; EDWARD SMITH. These 
witnesses, all of Fochabers and confined for suspicion, only declare that 
Glascoe commanded the party which attacked the King's troops at Keith. 
They saw him march his detachment for that service out of Fochabers, 
and march them back into Fochabers with 75 prisoners and 32 horses. 
That the detachment were mostly volunteers. They marched out at 
nightfall and returned from Keith with the prisoners next morning. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told these gentlemen that he 
was Major of Lord Ogilvie's second battalion. He told the former 
(Capt. Eyre) that he was born in France, and therefore not a subject of 
the King's, but he also told him that he was born at Dublin in Ireland. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON ; JOHN FALCONER. Testify to prisoner being 
with the rebels in arms at Derby, Carlisle, Lancaster, Edinburgh, 
Glasgow, Fochabers, Elgin, Inverness, and at battles of Falkirk and 
Culloden. 

FRANCIS CHALMERS ; EDWARD GIBSON ; DAVID BELL ; THOMAS 
HENDERSON. All these testify to prisoner being armed and dressed as 
aforesaid at Stirling, Fochabers, Inverness, and Culloden. 

Note. Prisoner was formerly a Lieutenant in Dillon's regiment in 
French service, but in the rebellion he acted as Major to Lord Ogilvie's 
second battalion. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDRELL. I agree the facts are treason if committed by a 
subject ; but he was a French officer, a native of France, and came over 



DEPOSITIONS At JACOBITE TRIALS. 421 

with Lord John Drummond in a French regiment, so owned no local 
allegiance. When young, could only speak French, and learnt Irish sort 
of English to enable him to be in the Irish regiment in French service. 

Born at St. Germains on At York, proved could only speak 

French, and therefore acquitted. Birth not shewn here and it turns the 
proof on the Crown. The French officers were ordered to discipline the 
rebels ; and prisoner as above, being in Militia, declined it, but 
reprimanded, and ordered to do it. But if (he was) barely born here, and 
ever since in France and done no act of allegiance, he can't be a rebel. 

It is certainly so in all other countries carries it much too 

far. Our King is King of France, but don't protect these subjects. 
Prisoner is of licence to serve French King. Is it not a defence ? Cartel 
of Frankfort is a licence. Should not be very strict in requiring proof as 
we are at war with France, and our law differs from the laws of all other 
countries. 

JOHN O'NEILL. I knew him (prisoner) in 1725, in Flanders, a cadet 
in Dillon's, in French service : was then about 10 years old. Spoke 
natural French and broken English, but not like Irish. Was his bedfellow 
seven years at Valencienes. I, coming from Ireland and not speaking 
French, was recommended to his father, a Captain in same regiment, 
named Christian Glascoe. He lived chiefly at Paris, and had been from 
Ireland ever since the wars in Ireland. I was to help him to learn 
English, he spoke French as a native. Heard call them father and son. 
Saw the father in 1729 at Valairlxdon, and he said prisoner was born at 
St. Germain, and was 10 years old when he came into the service. 

[Certificate of the Minister of St Germains offered, but it appearing to 
be founded on a register, and no copy sent or oath offered, it was 
rejected.] 

Mr. ATTORNEY GENERAL. He was offered to have passports for 
witnesses if he made an affidavit. 

PRISONER. Could not do it in honour, it being a submission. 

DAVID CARNY. I knew his father who resided at Paris. Prisoner 
spoke French naturally. Reported son of Christian who came over from 
Limerick. I knew him in 1729, in garrison at Strasburgh. In Dillon's 
regiment they must learn English. He was then a young lad. Heard 



422 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

he was born at St. Germains, and called Enfant de St. Germains in 1729, 
which is child of St. Germains. 

Captain MACDERMOT. I knew him from 1732. Embarked at 
Dunkirk, i$th November, 1745, under command of Lord J. Drummond 
in French service. Landed in Scotland. He was ordered by Stapleton 
to discipline Lord Ogilvie's second battalion. He declined it, and was 
threatened to be sent back and tried by a council of war, and ordered to 
do it in name of most Christian King. Always considered he was still 
under French commission, and believes he had no other. Many French 
officers got highland clothes as a protection against the highlanders who 
joined us. Usual for the officers of that regiment to call themselves 
Irishmen, though not born there. He was called Major before. 

Capt. JOHN BURK. I knew him five years as Lieutenant in Dillon's. 
Forced to discipline the Militia. I wore highland habit to avoid danger 
in travelling in red clothes. He was reported and received pay as a 
French officer. He was called a St. Germains' bird, an expression 
imputing his birth there. I always called him townsman, I being born 
there. The father was agent as well as Captain, and therefore stayed at 
Paris. His mother bore a French name, and two years ago heard the 
father say he was born at St. Germains. If I was asked I should own 
myself an Irishman for the glory of it, and would never own myself a 
Frenchman. 

Capt. DELEIIIDE. 37 years officer in Duke of Berwick's regiment. 
Prisoner was ten years abroad with his regiment in Germany. He was 
threatened into discipling the Militia. 

Capt. GARRY. In a French regiment, officers wore highland clothes. 
He was called a Garcon Major. Always considered him as acting under 
French commission, and had no other. In 1727, he was in Arras with 
his father. Heard the father say prisoner was born in St. Germains. 
Spoke French naturally. We claim it as an honour to have Irish blood 
in our veins. I was born in France, yet, call myself an Irishman. 

PRISONER. I owned myself an Irishman to be better used by Eyre, 
who is an Irishman. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 433 

Chief Justice WILLS. The evidence is too strong, and he must be 
acquitted, for he owns no natural allegiance, or local, for he came over as 
an enemy, and never put himself under our King's protection. 

The Court ordered his irons off, and that he should not be discharged, 
but kept as a prisoner of war. 

[Information laid at Fochabers in Moray Not guilty^\ 



ROBERT FORBES. 

JOHN VERE ; SAMUEL MADDOCK. These witnesses were in Carlisle 
when the town was besieged by the Duke of Cumberland, and say the 
defendant was a Captain in the rebel service, and was in garrison in 
Carlisle, armed with a sword and a brace of pistols. He did duty in the 
town as an officer in its defence against the Duke. 

C.THOMAS CHALMERS, No. 31 ; C. ALEX. FORBES, No. 47 ; C. JOHN 
FRAZER, No. 48 ; C. JOHN OGILVY, No. 89 ; C. JOHN URQUHART, No. 
105 ; C. JOHN CONNOR, No. 36 ; Lin. WM. WILLS, No. 1 10. Declare 
they were left in garrison in the castle of Carlisle by the rebels when the 
rebel army marched from thence to Scotland, and say defendant was one 
of the rebel officers left in garrison there ; was called a Captain, and did 
duty as such in defence of the town and castle against the King's forces 
when the Duke besieged it. 

Lin. ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125. I was left in garrison in Carlisle by the 
rebels when they marched into England, and saw defendant, one of the 
officers left there, walking about the castle and ramparts, observing that 
the sentinels did their duty. 

Y. HUGH MACDUGALL, No. 60. I was kept in Carlisle whilst the 
rebel army were in England, during which time I saw defendant mount 
guard, and do duty in the castle of Carlisle as one of the officers left in 
garrison there. 

JOHN DAVISON. I saw prisoner upon duty in Carlisle, and saw him 
march at the head of a party of the rebels towards the English gate, 



424 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

with pipes playing before them, with a sword by his side, and a fuzee in 
his hand. I frequently saw him at the castle yard with other rebel 
officers, and generally with a sword by his side, and a pistol stuck in his 
belt. 

CHAS. HENDRY. The prisoner was one of the rebel officers in 
garrison in Carlisle, and commanded the guard to be drawn out upon an 
alarm that the King's forces were coming to attack the town. He was 
then armed with a pistol. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDRELL. All the evidence confined to Carlisle. He is a 
farmer of the Duke of Gordon's. Forced out and confined by Glenbucket, 
and made several attempts to escape put on woman's clothes drank 
the Duke's health and success to his arms. 

Mr. GORDON. He could only escape by Firth of Forth and Stirling 
Bridge, both of which guarded. 

1. GEORGE WYATT. Lives a mile and half from Strathbogie. Sent 
Cope hay into Banff, and two of his men into the King's service. A 
maidservant came to me to assist her master, seized by the rebels. Saw 
20 with drawn swords. He offered money and all he had to let him go. 
He struck one of 'em put him on horseback, with bridle and saddle, 
and carried him to Strathbogie. Took him from mother and sister. One 
shot for deserting. Eight days after .... fair. 

2. ALEX. GILL. I was sent to give notice to gentlemen to keep out 
of the way of the rebels returning to take them. Saw him fetched in 
sleep, dragged out bareheaded and coat torn. They charged him as 
villian for serving Cope, and giving him two men. 

3. ROBERT GRAY. Same as above kept at Dundee by force. 

4. GEORGE KAY. Saw him at Leith try to get boat to escape. 

5. ANNE GRAHAM. He drank the Duke's health with Dr. Douglas 
and cursed the Pretender. Helped to dress him in women's clothes to 
escape, and he had ropes, but stopped by sentinels. 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 425 

6. JANE SIMPSON. Helped him to my mother's clothes. Stopped 
by sentry. Had ropes under arms. 

7. Capt. EYRE. Prisoner helped the surrender. 

[Acquitted by Mr. Attorney's consent.] 



JAMES GORDON. 

JOHN VERB ; SAMUEL MADDOCK. These witnesses were in Carlisle 
when it was besieged by the Duke, and say defendant was an officer in 
the rebel service, and belonged to the Artillery, and did duty as such, 
armed with a sword and pistols during the said siege. 

ARCH. LAUDER, No. 131. Witness was left in garrison in Car- 
lisle when the rebels marched from thence into Scotland, and saw 
the cannon fired from the castle upon the Duke's army. I saw the 
defendant, who was a Lieutenant in rebel service, belonging to the 
Artillery, upon the ramparts in the castle, assist in levelling the cannon 
upon the Duke's army. 

C. JOHN OGILVY, No. 89 ; C. JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; La. WILLIAM 
MAGGEE, No. 7 ; Y. HUGH MCDUGALL, No. 60 ; CHARLES HENDRY. 
These were left in garrison by the rebels when they marched into England, 
and stayed there until the town surrendered to the Duke. Prisoner, a 
Lieutenant in Pretender's service, was left in garrison, and did duty as an 
officer in defence of the place. 

[Guilty, but reprieved.] 

+. 

JAMES RATTRAY. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 9. Prisoner marched with the second 
battalion of Lord Ogilvy's regiment from Dundee to Stirling, and he 
wore a white cockade and sword and pistols in said march, and rode 
mostly on horseback. 

ALEX. SMITH. I saw prisoner with said regiment at Fochabers, 
Elgin, Cullen and Aboyne, armed with sword and pistols and white 
cockade. 

E 2 



426 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JOHN BRUCE. Prisoner was officer in said battalion after battle of 
Prestonpans. Commanded a party of the rebels who escorted some 
cannon from Brechin in Angus towards Perth, and was then armed with 
sword and pistols. 

WM. TODD. I saw prisoner with a party of rebels at Forfar, having 
some cannon going to Perth, dressed in highland clothes, and a sword by 
his side. Saw him afterwards with the rebels at Fochabers, armed and 
dressed as aforesaid, and appeared to be an officer. 

JAMES MORTIMER. Prisoner was an officer in said regiment, and 
marched with it to Dundee, Brechin, Aberdeen, Old Meldrum, Fochabers 
and Elgin, dressed in highland clothes, and armed with sword and pistols. 

JAMES SCOTT. I saw prisoner with said regiment at Elgin, and at 
Speyside in the shire of Murray, dressed and armed as aforesaid. 

WALTER YOUNG. I saw prisoner with said regiment from Montrose 
to Stirling, from thence through Perth, Aberdeen, Old Meldrum and 
Fochabers, dressed and armed as aforesaid. 

JOHN ADAM. I saw him with the rebels upon retreat from Stirling 
at Brechin on march towards Inverness, &c. (as above). 

Capt EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner gave his name to these 
gentlemen after the battle of Culloden, and said he was a volunteer in 
Lord Ogilvie's regiment in the rebel army. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. Prisoner was a volunteer in Lord Ogilvie's 
regiment in the rebel army, and was with them when they took 
Carlisle and at Derby. I saw him with them at Perth, Fochabers, and at 
the battles of Falkirk and Culloden, armed, &c., as aforesaid. 

JOHN FALCONER. I saw him with the rebels at Edinburgh, and he 
was then in the Pretender's Life Guards, and armed with broadsword 
and pistols. 

FRANCIS CHALMERS. I saw prisoner in Lord Ogilvie's regiment 
when the rebels took Carlisle and several times upon the march in 
England, and at Fochabers and Elgin, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TklALS. 427 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDRELL. Rely on original and continual force. The Marquis 
of Tullibardine forced all the tenants of Athole prisoners. Advised many 
to keep out of the rebellion. This produced a resenting letter 
threatening military execution. He drove his cattle into the mountains 
and hid with them. Got violent cold ; found out. Deserted in England, 
and at home at battle of Falkirk. Continued to dissuade ; seized again 
by party sent in the night. He concealed himself in the ceiling, but 
found out, and carried away prisoner as a deserter. At Elgin he attempted 
to escape. Deserted before the battle of Culloden, and was 100 miles off. 
Lived at home until seized by the Duke's Hussars. 

Mr. GORDON. Dissuading others confirms the force on himself. 

I. Mr. BRODIE. Servant to his father 20 years. Could influence 300 
men to go into the rebellion. He and I went to tenants and neighbouring 
gentlemen to desire them not to join the rebels, latter end of September. 
In harvest field he received a letter from the Marquis threatening fire. 
Advised sending cattle away. Sent them and went into the mountains. 
Stayed eight days. Vomited blood and came home sick. When 
Tullibardine heard it he sent 50 armed men. Wounded, tied and dragged 
him, and carried him towards Blair. Sent after him by his wife with 
clean clothes to Dunkeld. Would not let me speak to him. Saw him 
again the Monday before Falkirk battle at his house, and he said he 
deserted and came home on his own feet. Fresh orders came from 
Tullibardine to raise men, and prisoner sent about to hinder it. 

February ist seized again, being hid in ceiling. Took his gardener 
first for him, and gardener's wife pointed to the ceiling to save her husband. 
Was carried away as a deserter. He had no arms when he came home. 
Carried him surrounded to Kerrymuir on the way to Brechin, whither I 
followed him, but could have no access at first, but at last met with one 
who brought me to him, and he ordered me to go home and tell his wife 
he would come back as soon as he could get released. 

His father then at home, but old, and they did not ask for him. They 
found father in the field, and asked for the son. He would not tell them, 
and they used him badly pushed him about and called him an old man 




428 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

threw him down, but he kept his feet. They left him and came towards 
the house, and met me within quarter of a mile from the house, upwards 
of 50 yards from the father. They talked Erse, and I did not understand 
them. I went from the father a shorter way to the house to tell a party 
was coming, and then went again towards the field. Letter read. 
Donald Macdonald, George Leith, John Masterton, May Taylor, Margt. 
Chalmers, Agnes Mitchel, present, 28th September, at sunrising. Three 
days after came another letter, addressed to him in the field, loth October. 
Carried off. 

2. ROWLAND DRUMOND. It was Marquis's hand, dated 29th Sept r ., 
1745, directed to James Rattray, Esq. "Notwithstanding the several 
messages you have had, and nothing done, I command you to appear, 
else military execution." 

3. JOHN BLACK. I heard him read the letters, and he told all to 
abscond and send away cattle. He went to the woods next morning, 
stayed six or seven days, and came home sick. 

loth October 40 [men] came took off my shoes went into his house 
and brought him out with hands tied, and carried him away towards 
Dunkeld, where Tullibardine was. Did not see him again till Monday 
before Falkirk. He came home, tired, on foot. Wrote letters to neigh- 
bouring gentlemen. I carried one to James Rattray of Tuig(?) who read 
it to me, and he said he was obliged to prisoner for it. Saw him carried 
away the second time. Saw him at home at noon, I7th April, 80 miles 
from Culloden, and he stayed at home till the Hussars took him in 
beginning of May. Did not see Brodie. Must not go by my house 
from the field to the prisoner's house. 

4. JAMES Howv. Had letters in September, and desired tenants to 
keep themselves and cattle out of the way. He went to hide next 
morning. Carried off loth October, market day. Met him on the road, 
bound, with 50 highlanders, armed. Saw him at home Monday before 
Falkirk, and he sent letters about to keep back men from joining the 
rebels. He could have carried in 400 men, being so beloved : none went. 
Seized a second time. I carried his linen, and by help of an acquaintance 
delivered it. He bid me tell his wife he would escape as soon as he 
could. Returned again and stayed at home until taken ist May. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 429 

5. JAMES HABORN. I saw him at Strathbogie weekly market latter 
end of February last, but in prison. He asked why, and he said it was 
for deserting from the Athol men. Strathbogie is 60 miles from 
prisoner's house. 

6. JOHN STUART. I live three miles from Strathbogie. I saw him 
tied last day of February. Offered first drink to see him. They said he 
was a deserter, and they would take more care of him. Saw him at 
Elgin in April, but not so close a prisoner. He asked me to help him to 
escape. I undertook it, and nth and I2th April I went with him to the 
castle of Brumor (sic), where I left him five days going. 

[Information laid at Elgin, Moray Not guiltyl\ 



COLIN MACKENZIE. 

DONALD MUNRO, No. i ; DONALD FRAZER, No. 8. These witnesses 
say that upon return of Lord Cromartie's regiment from Caithness to 
Dunrobin Castle they saw prisoner with said regiment, in which he was 
an officer. Prisoner was not in it fourteen days before he was taken at 
Dunrobin. 

HUGH ROSS. I saw prisoner, who was Captain in Lord Cromartie's 
regiment in the rebel army, along with said regiment at Thurso in 
Caithness, where they went to raise men for the Pretender, dressed in 
highland clothes, a white cockade, and armed with broadsword and pistols. 
I saw him march on foot with said regiment from Thurso to Dunrobin 
Castle. 

HECTOR CAMPBELL. I saw prisoner at Thurso, and upon the march 
to Dunrobin with said regiment. 

GEO. SINCLAIR. Testifies to the very same effect as against Hector 
Mackenzie, save that prisoner Colin declared that he did not join the 
party till after battle of Falkirk. He was a Captain in Lord Cromartie's 
regiment. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told these gentlemen he was a 
Captain in Lord Cromartie's regiment. 






430 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 



CROSS-EXAMINATION OF WITNESSES. 

1. HECTOR CAMPBELL. Rebels in possession of the ferries not 
easy to have got into Ross-shire. Lord Sutherland's Militia up, and 
thinks might have been secure if gone to them. But we did not know it, 
until taken by surprise. Lord Reay's men in arms, but not known. 

2. HUGH Ross. Prisoner was in Caithness. Stayed a night at a 
minister's house. Three of us had bread and cheese. No guard on him 
two or three rebels stayed at same parson's house. He lives near 
Lochbroom, and was not in the regiment at Falkirk. Lord Cromartie's 
men were against rebelling. Barrisdale's men conducted them to 
Sutherland. He apprehends it was to protect them against Lord 
Loudoun's men. Could not get into Ross-shire. The march after 
Barrisdale's men left us was 50 highland miles back and forward. Lord 
Sutherland and Lord Reay's men were known to be up all the while we 
were in Caithness. I was taken three miles off from Dunrobin. 

3. DONALD MUNRO. Force used by Keppoch and Ardlow. The 
Macdonalds kept the passes while we were in Caithness to prevent our 
desertion. 

4. DONALD FRAZER. I saw him in Caithness in Cromartie's company, 
and marching in middle of common men to Dunrobin Castle. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDRELL. Defendant 18 years old. No evidence till after 
Falkirk. Forced in just before the march to Caithness. The law does 
not require proof of continuing force. It only extends to those who 
prove personal original force, and it must be fear of death, but that 
depends on circumstances. In October prisoner took up arms to oppose 
Barrisdale. 

i. JAMES ROBINSON. He was well behaved to the Estate of 
Sutherland. Letters in October to meet together from Lord Cromartie. 
They consulted me, and we were of opinion to make no return to it, for 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 431 

fear of provoking enemies. We were in suspense about Lord Cromartie. 
Prisoner went with 50 others to oppose Barrisdale, and drove him away. 
Beginning of November Lord Cromartie's son came in a soft way to 
induce them to join, and insinuated that their opposition to Barrisdale 
would be their destruction. I advised him against it. All concluded to 
return fair words, and sent prisoner for four days to conduct Lord Macleod. 
He returned in four days, and had conducted him over the hills. Our 
parish continued quiet till I4th March (the prisoner being at home all the 
while and determined to oppose the rebellion), then orders came to raise 
my parish of the name of Mackenzie, threatening military execution. 
About 60 men full armed came with these orders. Prisoner and others 
skulked to a retired place eight miles off, and I heard he was taken going 
to a hiding place of his brother's. I was imprisoned on suspicion of 
having letters, and was carried to their quarters and saw him prisoner, 
guarded by four men. They said they would make him smart for 
deserting Lord Macleod. Next day the party came for victuals to the 
town, and gave him leave to hark a word to me, and he whispered that 
he would desert if he could. We sent a scout to find out a place to 
advertise them how to get back. 

2. JOHN MACRAE. He helped to oppose Barrisdale in October. In 
March the rebels heard of message from prisoner's brother to him, and so 
he was seized, and I saw him prisoner next morning with 50 armed men. 
His mother could not get access at first, but did after, and begged him to 
be left as a youth, and offered half she had, but they said he was saucy 
to their captain and should go. I was employed to find a pass for them 
to get home if they could escape. I put on a cockade and pretended to 
be a rebel, and so passed. Saw him at Tain 10 days after, and could not 
get him away. They said he was a stubborn beast. He was a prisoner, 
but I got liberty to speak privately to him. He said he was strictly 
guarded, and was to go over Dornoch Firth next day, and then he could 
not have any hopes. Always wore highland clothes. 

Mr. ATTORNEY GENERAL. Being only a short time in their company 
I give it up. 

[Information laid at Dornoch in shire of Sutherland Not guilty.] 



432 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

WALTER OGILVY. 

Y. JOHN ALLAN, No. 2. Defendant was an Ensign in the Duke of 
Perth's regiment in the rebel army, and marched with them to Carlisle. 
I saw him with part of the Duke of Perth's regiment in the trenches, 
before Carlisle, when the rebels besieged and took it, armed with sword 
and pistols. The defendant continued in Carlisle, and did duty as an 
officer in defence of the place against the King's forces, armed as afore- 
said, when it was besieged by the Duke. 

SAMUEL MADDOCK. The defendant was one of the rebel officers in 
garrison in Carlisle when it was besieged by the Duke, during which time 
I frequently saw him mount guard in the guard room in the castle, at the 
head of parties of the rebels, armed with broadsword, dirk, blue bonnet, 
and white cockade. 

JOHN VERE. I frequently saw defendant mount guard as an officer 
in Carlisle, armed with firelock, a brace of pistols, and a broadsword, 
between 2oth and 3Oth December last, when it surrendered to the Duke. 

C. JOHN CONNOR, No. 36; Lin. ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125 ; C. ALEX. 
REACH, No. 91. These witnesses testify to defendant's presence in 
Carlisle as a rebel officer. 

C. JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; C. JOHN OGILVY, No. 89 ; La. WM. 
MAGGEE, No. 7 ; Lin. WM. WILLS, No. 1 10 ; Lin. ARCH. LAUDER, 
No. 131. These witnesses say defendant was an Ensign in the Duke of 
Perth's regiment, and marched with it from Dalkeith to Carlisle, armed 
with sword and pistols. He was one of the rebel officers left in garrison 
in Carlisle when the rebel army marched back from thence to Scotland, 
and he appeared, acted and did duty as an officer in defence of the place 
when it was besieged by the Duke. 

ALLAN STEWART. I saw prisoner amongst the rebels at Edinburgh 
a few days after the battle of Prestonpans, armed with a small sword. 
Saw him afterwards with the rebels at Carlisle, armed as aforesaid. 

WM. McGHlE. I saw the prisoner at Edinburgh, armed with sword 
and pistols. Saw him upon the march carry the colours of the Duke of 
Perth's regiment towards Carlisle, and frequently in that place draw up 
the rebel soldiers. 

[ Withdrew his plea and pleaded guilty. Executed 22nd August ', 1746.] 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 433 

JAMES NICHOLSON. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL, Esq. I saw defendant among the rebels in 
Edinburgh before the rebel army marched to England, and he was then 
dressed in highland habit, and armed with sword and pistols. 

SAM. MADDOCK. Defendant was a Lieutenant in Captain Gad's 
company in the Duke of Perth's regiment, and witness frequently saw 
him mount guard at the English and Irish ports in Carlisle at the head 
of parties of Captain Gad's company, when the town was besieged by the 
King's forces. He wore the highland habit, blue bonnet, and white 
cockade, and was armed with broadsword, dirk, and side pistol. After 
the town surrendered to the Duke he endeavoured to make his escape, 
but was taken by the Duke's army. 

JOHN VERB. When Carlisle was besieged by the Duke I saw 
defendant, who was an officer in the rebel army, with firelock, pistols and 
broadsword, mount guard in Carlisle between the 2oth and 3Oth of 
December last. 

JOHN FRAZER. Testifies as above, and says defendant was a Lieut, 
in the Duke of Perth's regiment, and marched with it from Dalkeith to 
Carlisle, armed as aforesaid. 

JOHN WHITE, No. 109. Defendant was at the head of his company 
when the Pretender was proclaimed there. 

C. JOHN URQUHART, No. 105 ; C. DONALD STEWART, No. 103 ; 
La. WILLIAM MAGGEE, No. 7. These witnesses testify to defendant's 
presence as a rebel officer, armed as aforesaid, at Carlisle, when it was 
besieged by the Duke. 

ROGER MACDONALD ; THOMAS DRAKE ; JOHN DAVISON. These 
witnesses saw prisoner on the march with the rebels, and at Derby and 
Carlisle. 

WM. MACGlHE. The prisoner was with the rebels at Edinburgh, 
and at their camp at Duddington, upon the march of Duke of Perth's 
regiment to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols. Frequently saw him 
upon duty in castle of Carlisle ; draw up the rebel soldiers there. 

[Withdrew his plea and pleaded guilty. Executed 22nd August, 1746.} 

F 2 



434 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 



DONALD MACDONALD. 

JOHN VERE. I was left in Carlisle when the rebels marched to 
Scotland. I saw defendant armed with firelock, pistols, and broadsword, 
mount guard in Carlisle as an officer in rebel army, between 2Oth and 
30th of December last, when the town was besieged and surrendered to 
the Duke of Cumberland. 

CHAS. CAMPBELL, Esq. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh 
before they marched into England, and he then appeared to be one of 
them, and he was then dressed in a highland habit, and was armed with 
broadsword and pistols. 

La. WM. MAGGEE, No. 7 ; C. JOHN CONNOR, No. 36. These 
witnesses were left in Carlisle by the rebels after they had taken it, and 
when they marched further into England, the defendant was one of 
the officers left in garrison there to keep possession thereof for the rebels. 
Defendant did stay in garrison there during all the time the rebel army 
was in England. 

La. DAN. McFARLAN, No. 15. This witness by interpreter says as 
above, and further that he heard the defendant give directions to the 
private men left in garrison there to be ready to mount guard, and that 
the prisoner continued in garrison among the other rebel officers when 
the same was besieged and taken by the Duke. 

Y. HUGH MCDUGALL, No. 60; C. ALEX. REACH, No. 91 ; C. JOHN 
URQUIIART, No. 105. Testify to the same effect as foregoing. 

C. THOMAS CHALMERS, No. 31 ; C. JOHN DONALDSON, No. 42; 
C. ALEX. FORBES, No. 47 ; C. JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; C. JOHN OGILVY, 
No. 89. These witnesses were left in garrison in Carlisle when the rebels 
inarched to Scotland, and defendant was one of the officers left there, and 
did duty as such in defence of the place against the King's forces. 

C. DONALD STEWART, No. 103 ; Lan. ISABELL CAMPBELL, No. 72 ; 
Lin. WM. WILLS, No. no; Lin. ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125; Lin. ARCH. 
LAUDER, No. 131 ; Y. JOHN ALLAN, No. 2. These witnesses declare as 
above. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 435 

JOHN DAVISON. Often saw prisoner among the rebels at Carlisle, 
but does not remember seeing him armed, or upon any duty. 

Capt. CRAIG. Upon the surrender of the castle to the Duke, 
prisoner's commission of Captain was taken from him by witness, and 
it is under the hand and seal of Charles P. R. 

[Withdrew his plea and pleaded guilty. Executed 22nd August, 174.6.} 



CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR. 

SAMUEL HADDOCK. The defendant joined the rebel army at Stock- 
port, near Manchester, and there he enlisted in the Manchester regiment 
as an Ensign in the Pretender's service. He marched from thence to 
Derby and back again to Carlisle on foot, armed with broadsword, 
blunderbuss and pistol, with white cockade in his hat. He frequently 
mounted guard at the head of parties of the Manchester regiment at the 
Town Hall in Carlisle during the siege thereof by the Duke, armed as 
aforesaid. 

C. AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34. I was enticed into the rebel service 
at Manchester, and went with them to Derby and back to Carlisle. 
When the rebels marched from Carlisle to Scotland the Manchester 
regiment was drawn up in the castle yard before the officers of the 
regiment, and I then saw the defendant, who was called an Ensign in 
that regiment, and appeared as such, present on that occasion, with a 
sword by his side, a plaid sash on, and white cockade in his hat. 

[ Wit/tdrew his plea and pleaded guilty, and ivas reprieved.} 



WILLIAM BRITTOUGH ALIAS BRITTER. 

BENJAMIN BOWKER. When the vanguard of the rebels came to 
Manchester, I saw defendant along with them at the " Bull Head Inn," 
with a white cockade in his hat, and I believe he had then taken on with 
them. 



436 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

THOS. CRAGG. I saw defendant with the rebels at Preston, in the 
retreat, with a white cockade in his hat, and afterwards at the head of the 
Manchester regiment as an officer when it was drawn up on Penrith Moor, 
with a white cockade, plaid sash, and armed with a gun. I afterwards 
saw him upon guard in Carlisle, when it was besieged by the Duke, and 
march at the head of an armed party to the guard house. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. These gentlemen and others, upon 
the surrender of Carlisle, were ordered by his Royal Highness to view 
and mark the rebel officers who defended the town, which they did, and 
know the prisoner to be one of them. 

SAM. MADDOCK. I was an officer in the Manchester regiment, and 
defendant enlisted with the rebels at Manchester as an officer (Ensign) 
in the Manchester regiment, and marched with it from there to Derby 
and back to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols. The defendant 
frequently mounted guard in Carlisle at the Town Hall at the head of a 
party of the Manchester regiment, armed as aforesaid, with a white 
cockade in his hat. 

JOHN COLLENS (aged 13, examined by permission of C. J. Lee, Wright 
and Reynolds). I frequently saw the defendant amongst the rebels at 
Manchester, with a white cockade in his hat, also upon the march with 
the rebels between Manchester and Penrith, armed as aforesaid, with a 
white cockade in his hat. 

C. ORMSBY MCCORMACK. I was taken from Manchester and made 
to carry a spade, and assist to mend the roads for the rebels' artillery to 
Derby, and back to Preston, where I was prevailed upon to list in the 
Manchester regiment. Then I marched with them to Carlisle. The 
defendant was an Ensign in said regiment, armed as aforesaid ; carried 
the colours upon the march with the rebel army from Preston to Carlisle. 
When the rebel army marched from Carlisle to Scotland, the Manchester 
regiment was drawn up in the castle, where arms were distributed to them. 
The defendant was then present at the head of the men as an officer ; 
had a plaid sash on and a white cockade. 

[Found guilty. Had sentence reprieved.} 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 437 

CHARLES KINLOCH. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 9. I saw the prisoner Charles Kinloch at 
Dundee, whilst the rebels were in possession of that town. He marched 
along with the second battalion of Lord Ogilvie's regiment from Dundee 
to Stirling, wearing a highland habit, a white cockade, and sword. 
Sometimes the prisoner rode, and if he had not pistols before him, he 
had them at his side. From Stirling the rebel army marched towards 
Inverness, part through the highlands, and part by Brechin to Perth, 
from thence to Aberdeen and Fochabers. The prisoner marched with 
that part of the rebel army which passed the latter way. In said 
marches the drums were beating, pipes playing, and colours displayed. 
The prisoner marched from Aberdeen with the second battalion of Lord 
Ogilvie's regiment to Fochabers. The night before the battle of Culloden 
witness saw the prisoner marching up to Inverness with said battalion. 
Upon Tuesday, the I5th of last April, he saw the whole rebel army 
drawn up in order of battle on Culloden Moor expecting the Duke of 
Cumberland. He saw the prisoner at that time drawn up in arms with 
said rebel army. 

THOS. ARMSTRONG. I saw prisoner at Stirling with the rebels. He 
was Captain of the Grenadiers in second battalion of Lord Ogilvie's 
regiment, and was armed with sword and pistols, and wore a white 
cockade. I saw him with them at Aberdeen, at Speyside, and at 
Fochabers, armed and dressed as aforesaid. He gave witness is. at 
Brechin on the march. 

ALEX. SMITH. This witness proves the prisoner to be an officer, 
armed and dressed as aforesaid, with the rebels at Stirling. 

CHARLES MATHER. Proves as above, and that prisoner was with 
the rebels at Stirling, Aberdeen, and at the barracks over against 
Fochabers, armed, &c., as aforesaid. 

JOHN BRUCE. I saw him march into Brechin at the head of his men 
in highland clothes, with sword and pistols. 

ROBERT NAIRN. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Montrose, 
Fochabers, and Culloden Moor, before the battle there, dressed in high- 
land dress, and armed with broadsword and pistols. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

WILLIAM TODD. This witness proves prisoner to have been with the 
rebels at Stirling, Aberdeen, and Fochabers, always in highland dress, 
armed with a broadsword. He was called a Captain. 

ROBERT MACKEY. I saw prisoner march with the rebels from Brechin 
to Fochabers and Elgin, Nairn, as an officer in second battalion [Lord 
Ogilvic's regiment], dressed and armed as aforesaid. 

JOHN WILSON. I saw him march north with his men after the battle 
of Falkirk, from Coupar in Angus, dressed in short highland clothes. 

JAMES MORTIMER. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Aberdeen, 
Old Meldrum, Fochabers and Elgin, dressed in highland clothes, armed 
as aforesaid, and called a Captain. 

WALTER YOUNG. I saw prisoner at Stirling, Aberdeen, Fochabers, 
and Elgin, and he was called Captain in said battalion, was dressed in 
highland dress, with white cockade, and armed as aforesaid. 

ROBERT IRONS. This witness proves prisoner to be in said command, 
armed, &c., as aforesaid, at Montrose, Aberdeen, and Speyside. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. These gentlemen were appointed by 
his Royal Highness to take an account of the rebel prisoners at Inverness 
who were taken at the battle of Culloden, and the prisoner told these 
gentlemen he was a Captain in Lord Ogilvie's regiment in the rebel army. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. The prisoner was Captain in said regiment, 
and with them at Carlisle, and all the way in England. At the battle of 
Falkirk Elgin, Inverness, and Culloden Moor, armed as aforesaid. 

JOHN WILLIAMSON. Prisoner marched with the rebels from Dundee 
through Perth to Edinburgh, where he believed he turned back. 

[Information laid at Fochabers in Shire of Moray. Guilty. To be 
transported, with clioice of place of residence^ 



CHARLES DEACON. 

SAM. MADDOCK. When the rebels came to Manchester the defendant 
put on a small sword, a laced hat with white cockade, and enlisted in the 






DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 439 

Manchester regiment as Ensign. He marched with the rebel army to 
Derby and back to Carlisle on horseback, with a brace of pistols, a sword 
and white cockade. I saw him mount guard at the head of parties 
of the Manchester regiment in Carlisle, and do duty there as an officer 
when the town was besieged by the Duke. 

AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34. When the rebels marched from Carlisle 
into Scotland the Manchester regiment was drawn up in the castle yard 
before the officers, and defendant was then present as an officer, and was 
then called an Ensign, and had a sword by his side, a plaid sash on, and 
white cockade. 

THOMAS CRAGG, No. 88. The defendant marched with the rebel 
army from Preston to Carlisle, and was present at the head of the 
regiment in the castle of Carlisle when it was drawn up there. I saw 
him marching to the guard room in Carlisle at the head of parties of 
said regiment, who were armed with guns, when it was besieged by the 
Duke. 

THOS. BRADBURY. I saw the prisoner among the rebels at 
Manchester, armed with a small sword, and wearing a white cockade. 

JOHN COLLINS. Prisoner was seen upon the march with the rebel 
army by witness, from Manchester as far as Penrith. 

[Found guilty. Had sentence reprieved^ 



JAMES WILDING. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The defendant joined the rebels at Manchester, 
and enlisted there as an Ensign in the Manchester regiment, with which 
he marched on foot to Macclesfield, at which place his father came and 
brought him a horse, laced hat, sword and brace of pistols ; and got him 
made a Lieutenant of the Pioneers. He acted as such upon the march 
from Macclesfield to Derby, and back again to Carlisle, armed with a 
brace of pistols and small sword. He had a laced hat and white cockade. 
When they came to Carlisle the Pioneers were broke and incorporated in 
the Manchester regiment. The defendant was made an Ensign in said 



440 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

regiment, and did duty as such. Saw him frequently mount guard at 
the English port in Carlisle during the siege thereof by the Duke, armed 
as aforesaid, with a white cockade in his hat. 

JOHN COLLINS. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Manchester on 
their retreat, armed as aforesaid. Also upon the march to Penrith on 
horseback. 

THOMAS CRAGG, No. 88. I saw the defendant upon the march 
with the rebel army to Carlisle. Saw defendant marching to the guard 
room there when the King's forces were besieging it at the head of parties 
of the Manchester regiment. 

[Found guilt} 1 . Had sentence reprieved^ 



JOHN SANDERSON. 

SAM. MADDOCK. When the rebels came to Manchester I heard the 
defendant say he joined the rebels at or near Edinburgh. The defendant 
was made a Captain in the Manchester regiment, and marched with it 
from Manchester to Derby and back to Carlisle sometimes on horseback, 
at other times on foot, to keep the men together, and acted as a Captain 
in said regiment upon the march, armed with a broadsword and brace of 
pistols. He wore a white cockade and laced coat, which he said had lain 
by him since the last rebellion, and never put it on him till this occasion. 
He frequently mounted guard at the head of parties of the Manchester 
regiment at the Town Hall in Carlisle, and acted as an rebel officer in 
defence of the place when the town was besieged by the Duke, and when 
the capitulation was making he declared he would go up to the mouth of 
a cannon to serve the Pretender, and would rather be shot through the 
head than be at the mercy of the Elector of Hanover. 

JOHN COLLENS. I saw the defendant with the rebel army at 
Manchester, armed with a brace of pistols, and frequently upon the 
march with said army at Manchester and Penrith, sometimes on horseback, 
at other times on foot, at the head of parties of the Manchester regiment. 

C. ORMSBY McCORMACK, No. 86. I saw the defendant upon the 
march with the rebel army between Preston and Carlisle, armed with 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 441 

sword and pistols. When the rebel army marched from Carlisle to 
Scotland, the Manchester regiment was drawn up in the castle yard, 
where a great many arms were given to them, and the defendant was 
then present at the head of the men, with a plaid sash and cockade. 
Witness saw him upon guard as an officer in Carlisle when it was 
besieged by the Duke. 

AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34 ; La. JAMES WARREN, No. 36 ; 
THOMAS JAY, No. 58 ; THOMAS CRAGG, No. 88. These witnesses prove 
prisoner's presence with the rebels as an officer, armed and dressed as 
aforesaid, at Carlisle, and upon the march with the Manchester regiment. 

HUGH MACDUGALL, No. 60. I saw the defendant upon guard at the 
town gaol when the town was besieged by the Duke, and he ordered the 
sentry to take care of the witness, he having been taken up on pretence 
of writing letters to the English army. 

[Found guilty. Had sentence reprieved.} 



THOMAS CHADDOCH, OTHERWISE CIIADWICK. 

SAM. MADDOCK. When the rebels came first to Manchester the 
defendant put on a plaid waistcoat, laced hat, and white cockade, and 
enlisted in the Manchester regiment as a Lieutenant, and was busy there 
enlisting men. The defendant marched with the rebels to Derby and 
back to Carlisle, armed with a brace of pistols and small sword and a 
gun. He wore a white cockade and plaid waistcoat. In the churches at 
Derby and Lancaster the defendant played several tunes upon the organ 
amongst others that called " the 29th of May," or " the King shall enjoy 
his own again" which made him much esteemed by the chief officers of the 
rebels. During the siege of Carlisle by the Duke witness frequently saw 
him mount guard at the head of parties of the Manchester regiment at 
the Town Hall, armed as aforesaid, with a white cockade in his hat. 

Tuos. BRADBURY ; BENJAMIN BOWKER. Saw the defendant among 
several of the rebels, who were armed with sword and pistols, in the 
" Bull Head Inn " in Manchester the day the rebels came there, and was 
reputed then to have joined them. 

G 2 



442 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34 ; THOMAS JAY, No. 58 ; THOMAS CRAGG, 
No. 88. These witnesses declare the prisoner was in Carlisle with the 
rebels when the same was besieged by the Duke, he being a Lieutenant 
in the Manchester regiment. They saw him upon guard at the Town 
Hall of Carlisle, armed and dressed as aforesaid, at the head of a party 
of the Manchester regiment. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. Upon the surrender of Carlisle these 
gentlemen and others were appointed by his Royal Highness to view and 
mark the several rebel officers who defended the town, which they did, 
and know the defendant to be one of them. 

[Found guilty. Executed jot/i July, 174.6 his head to be placed at 
English gate at Carlisle?^ 



THOMAS SIDDALL. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The defendant was a barber in Manchester, and 
reputed non-juror, and when the rebels came there he put on a gold laced 
plaid waistcoat, laced hat, and white cockade, and enlisted as an Ensign 
or Adjutant to the Manchester regiment. He was the busiest of anybody 
at Manchester in enlisting men and searching. He marched with the 
Manchester regiment to Derby, armed with a sword and pistols, a French 
piece, and a white cockade in his hat. In said march defendant took up 
a shoemaker, who, he heard, had carried great numbers of shoes from 
Manchester thither in order to conceal them from the rebels, and the 
defendant sent a guard to seize them, which the guard did, and brought 
about three and four hundred pair of shoes to the rebel army. Defendant 
kept the shoemaker prisoner for three or four days. In the retreat of 
the rebels from Derby to Leek, the defendant went in the night from 
Lcck with Holker and some other rebel officers in order to have raised 
more men at Manchester, but, being surprised by the Militia, he quitted 
his horse and concealed himself until the rebel army came to Manchester. 
Then he got his horse again and committed several audacious things in 
Manchester, such as breaking open houses. The defendant marched with 
the rebels to Carlisle, and when he came there he had money lodged in 
his hands by the Pretender, as Adjutant to the Manchester regiment. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 443 

Witness saw the defendant frequently during the siege of Carlisle by the 
Duke, mount guard as Ensign at the Town Hall there, at the head of 
parties of said regiment, armed as aforesaid. Likewise saw him pay 
several of the companies of the Manchester regiment in Carlisle as 
Adjutant. 

JOHN COLLENS. I saw the defendant with the rebels at Manchester, 
with a white cockade in his hat, and a sword by his side, and frequently 
upon the march with the rebel army between Manchester and Penrith, 
on horseback, armed with sword and pistols, and a white cockade in his 
hat. 

ORMSBY McCORMACK, No. 86. This witness marched with the rebels 
from Manchester to Derby and back to Preston, where he entered with 
them, and marched to Carlisle. The defendant marched along with the 
rebel army, armed with sword and pistols. The Manchester regiment 
was drawn up in Carlisle Castle, when the rebels inarched to Scotland, 
when a great quantity of arms were given them. The defendant was 
then present as an officer at the head of the men, and had a plaid sash 
and cockade on. 

AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34; C. THOMAS JAY, No. 58; La. JAMES 
WARREN, No. 36 ; La. THOS. CRAC.G, No. 88. These witnesses testify 
as to the prisoner's presence with the rebel army at Manchester, Lancaster, 
and Carlisle, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

THOMAS BRADBURY. I saw defendant along with one of the rebel 
Serjeants and drums, beating up for volunteers in Manchester. The 
defendant pulled off his hat and huzza'd. He had then a white cockade. 
Saw him afterwards with the rebels at Manchester with a plaid waistcoat 
and white cockade. He came with some of the rebels to this witness to 
print an advertisement by order of the Pretender. 

[Found guilty. Executed jot/i July, 174.6. His head was placed at 

Manchester Exchange.'] 

ANDREW BLOOD ALIAS BLYDE. 

SAM. MADDOCK. I saw the defendant with the rebel army at 
Manchester when they first came thither, and he marched with them to 



444 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Derby and back to Carlisle. At Macclesfield defendant was made 
Captain of the Pioneers, and did duty as such till they came to Carlisle, 
and then the Pioneers were broke and incorporated in the Manchester 
regiment, and defendant was then made a Captain of a company in said 
regiment. He frequently mounted guard at the Town Hall in Carlisle, 
armed with a gun, at the head of a party of said regiment, and wore a 
laced hat and white cockade. 

JOHN VERB. I saw the defendant in Carlisle, armed with a gun, and 
he did duty as an officer when it was besieged by the Duke. 

AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34. Witness marched with the rebels from 
Manchester to Derby and back to Carlisle. He marched with the 
Pioneers, who went before the rebels' Artillery and baggage, and mended 
the roads for them to pass. They mended the roads between Macclesfield 
and Leek, about five miles from Macclesfield, and between Kendal and 
Penrith, about four miles north of Kendal on a mountain ; and again 
about two miles north of Shap. The defendant was an officer of the 
Manchester regiment, and commanded that party of the Pioneers, having 
a white cockade in his hat. The Manchester regiment was drawn up in 
the castle of Carlisle when the rebel army marched from thence into 
Scotland, and defendant was present at the head of the men, and had on 
a plaid sash and white cockade. 

THOMAS JAY, No. 58; C. ORMSBY MCCORMACK, No. 86; C. JOHN 
CONNOR, No. 36. These witnesses testify to the prisoner's presence with 
the rebels as an officer on the march commanding a party of Pioneers, 
and also in the garrison of Carlisle, when it was besieged by the Duke, 
dressed and armed as aforesaid. 

[ Witlidrcw his plea and pleaded guilty. Executed jotk July, 1746.} 



JAMES DAW SON. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The night the rebels came to Manchester the 
defendant was with them at the " Bull Head Inn," enrolling the names of 
the persons who enlisted at Manchester. The defendant put his own 
name first on the list as a Captain, and made up cockades. Defendant 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 445 

marched with the rebel army to Derby and back to Carlisle on horseback, 
armed with sword and pistols, and wore a white cockade. Upon the 
march to Derby defendant went with a party of the Manchester regiment 
to Bradley Hall, and brought away with him two brace of pistols. He 
beat up for volunteers at several places, and particularly at Derby, where 
he made a speech to this effect. " All gentlemen volunteers who are 
willing to serve His Royal Highness Charles, Prince of Wales, Regent 
of Scotland and Ireland, in one of His Royal Highnesses new raised 
English regiments, commonly called the Manchester regiment, under the 
command of Colonel Townley, let them repair to the ' Drum Head,' or 
to the Colonel's headquarters, where they shall be kindly entertained, 
enter into present pay and good quarters, receive all arms and accoutre- 
ments and everything fit to complete a gentleman soldier, and, for their 
further encouragement, when they arrive in London they shall receive 5 
guineas each and a crown to drink his Majesty King James's health, and, 
if not willing to serve any longer, they shall have a full discharge. Every 
man shall be rewarded according to his merits. God bless King James." 
During the siege of Carlisle he frequently saw the defendant mount guard 
at the head of parties of the Manchester regiment at the Town Hall, 
armed as aforesaid. 

THOS. BRADBURY ; C. AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34. Witnesses testify 
as to defendant's presence with the rebels as an officer in the Manchester 
regiment on the march to Derby, at which place he went about enlisting. 
Also at Carlisle, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

ORMSBY McCORMACK. I was forced by some of the rebels to 
go with them from Manchester to Derby and back to Preston. I was 
made drunk and prevailed upon to enlist with them, and marched with 
them to Carlisle. The defendant marched with said regiment and the 
rest of the rebel army to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols. He 
was left in garrison there when the army marched to Scotland. The said 
regiment was drawn up in the castle, and a great number of arms given 
to them, defendant being present as an officer at the head of the men, 
with a plaid sash and white cockade. Witness was several times upon 
guard in the town of Carlisle, and saw defendant upon guard when it was 
besieged by the Duke, dressed as aforesaid. 



446 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE fRULs. 

C. THOMAS JAY, No. 58 ; La. JAMES WARREN, No. 36 ; La. THOMAS 
CRAGG, No. 88. These witnesses declare as to defendant's presence with 
the Manchester regiment as an officer, armed and dressed as aforesaid, in 
garrison at Carlisle. Also upon the march from Wigan to Carlisle, and 
at Preston, where he walked the street with the rebels. Acted in defence 
of Carlisle against the Duke. 

[Found guilty. Executed jot/i July, 174.6.] 



JOHN BERWICK. 

SAM. MADDOCK. When the rebel army came to Manchester defendant 
put on a plaid waistcoat, laced hat, and white cockade, and enlisted in the 
Manchester regiment as Lieutenant. He marched with them from thence 
to Derby on foot, armed with a brace of pistols and a gun. In their 
retreat between Derby and Ashburn he stole a horse with saddle and 
holsters, and marched with them on horseback to Carlisle, and acted as a 
Lieutenant in said regiment. During the siege of Carlisle by the Duke, 
defendant frequently was seen by witness upon guard at the head of 
parties of said regiment at the Town Hall, armed as aforesaid. 

JOHN COLLENS. Testifies as above, and that he saw prisoner fre- 
quently on the march between Manchester and Derby, and between 
Derby and Penrith. 

[Found guilty. Executed jotk July, 174.6.] 



THOMAS DEACON. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The day the rebels came to Manchester the 
defendant put on a white cockade, a plaid waistcoat laced with gold, and 
a broadsword, and enlisted in the Manchester regiment as a Lieutenant. 
He was one of the busiest in persuading the common men to enlist, and 
went with parties of the rebels all over the town to search for arms, and 
gave those persons who enlisted one shilling each, and promised them $ 
more when they came to London. The defendant marched with the 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 447 

Manchester regiment to Derby and back to Carlisle. He acted as a 
Lieutenant in said regiment during the whole march, and he always 
marched on horseback in the same dress as aforesaid, with a brace of 
pistols and broadsword. He sent his servant as a spy into the Duke's 
army, and afterwards with an express to the Governor of Carlisle. The 
defendant was left in garrison at Carlisle, and remained there until the 
town and castle surrendered to the Duke, and witness frequently saw him 
mount guard at the Town Hall as an officer at the head of parties of 
said regiment. 

ORMSBY MCCORMACK, No. 86. This witness was left in Carlisle 
when the rebels marched to Scotland, and he testifies as to prisoner's 
presence in the garrison of Carlisle as a Captain, dressed and armed as 
aforesaid. 

THOS. BRADBURY. Witness declares as to the prisoner being with 
several rebels, dressed as aforesaid, and that he compelled witness to 
print the Pretender's Manifesto at Manchester. 

C. AUSTEN COLEMAN, No. 34. Witness went with the rebels from 
Manchester to Derby, where he saw the defendant go about the town 
with one of the rebel drummers, beating up for recruits for the rebels 
when the rebel army was there. He afterwards saw him go about with 
drums at Preston beating up for recruits. Saw him as an officer of the 
Manchester regiment when it was drawn up in the castle yard of Carlisle, 
upon the march of the rebels to Scotland, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

THOMAS CRAGG, No. 88. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Preston, 
and marching to the guard room at Carlisle at the head of a party of said 
regiment, armed and dressed as aforesaid, when the King's army were 
besieging the place. Saw him also at the head of said regiment when it 
was drawn up on Penrith Moor. 

BENJAMIN BOWKER. The night the vanguard of the rebels came to 
Manchester the witness saw the defendant among the crowd at the " Bull 
Head Inn," and desired him to go home, lest he should be hurt. Prisoner 
said he would, but the same evening witness saw him again at the same 
place with the rebels, with a white cockade in his hat, and believes he had 
then joined them. 



448 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. These witnesses declare defendant to 
be one of the rebel officers who defended the town of Carlisle. 

[Found guilty. Executed jot/i July, 1746. His head was placed at 

Manchester Exchange^ 



DAVID MORGAN, ESQ. 

SAM. MADDOCK. When the rebels came to Manchester I saw the 
defendant very busy amongst them with a white cockade in his hat. 
He was reputed the chief man in getting from the Pretender's son 
press warrants for horses and arms. The witness says a man came 
into the "Bull Head Inn" to the officers of the Manchester regiment, 
and informed them where Justice Dinkenfield, who had fled from thence 
on the rebels approach, was, and told them the Justice had carried a great 
many arms away with him. Defendant being acquainted herewith came 
into the room where the officers were, and asked the man some question 
as to Justice Dinkenfield, and immediately ordered the witness and 
another person to take the said man to defendant's quarters, where there 
was a guard set over a great many arms, which defendant had under his 
custody to arm the Manchester regiment. Defendant soon after came to 
his quarters, and examined the man thoroughly, and made him swear to 
what he said in the presence of the witnesses, and gave said man a 
shilling in hand, and told him he should be handsomely rewarded if what 
he told him was true, which was that he knew where Justice Dinkenfield 
was, and that he had a great quantity of arms with him. The defendant 
commanded the witness to stay with the men, whilst he went to acquaint 
the young Pretender of what the man had told him. When he returned 
he brought a file of Highlanders with him, and ordered them to conduct 
the witness and the said man to the Pretender's lodgings, where there was 
a horse ready for the man, and then the defendant gave Lord Pitsligo a 
search warrant, signed by the young Pretender, which was orders to bring 
Justice Dinkenfield, arms, and horses to the young Pretender. Witness 
went with Lord Pitsligo and a party of Hussars, but the Justice was fled. 

The witness afterwards frequently saw the defendant upon the march 
with the rebels from Manchester to Derby, armed with a brace of pistols 
and a broadsword, and wore a white cockade. In the retreat to Ashburn 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 449 

defendant came to the house where the Manchester officers were quartered, 
where Captain Dawson of the Manchester regiment gave him a brace of 
pistols, and there the defendant left the army. The witness heard 
defendant say that he had the offer of the Manchester regiment made 
him by the young Pretender, but that he refused it, not being a military 
man. That defendant was generally with the young Pretender at night, 
and lodged in the same quarters with him ; that he acted as a spy 
for the rebel army in observing the motion of the Duke's army. Further, 
that while the rebels were at Manchester defendant met Mr. Francis 
Townley, Peter Moss, James Dawson, George Fletcher, James Bradshaw, 
Thomas Furnival, Thomas Deacon, Robert Deacon, Charles Deacon, 
Andrew Blood, and several others, at Mr. Cookson's, the sign of the dog 
in Manchester, and there the defendant proposed the raising of a regiment 
for the Pretender, to which proposal all present agreed, and all of them 
then having white cockades in their hats. Then the company considered 
who should have command of the regiment, and, after a short consultation, 
offered the command to the defendant, but he thanked them and desired 
to be excused, saying he did not understand military discipline well 
enough to take so large a command upon him, and said that Mr. Townley 
had been in the French service, and understood the military discipline 
much better than him, whereupon Mr. Townley was named Colonel. 
He set his hand down in a paper first as Colonel, and the rest set down 
their names with the title of rank in said regiment, and then the defendant 
took the list away with him to the Pretender, and promised to furnish 
them with arms. Then ordered a drummer about the town to beat up 
for volunteers. 

JOHN BERRY, No. 3. He was a servant to Mr. William Vaughan in 
Monmouthshire, and in the beginning of November last his master told 
him that he was going a shooting at Mr. Berkeley of Speechly in 
Worcestershire, and bid him get a couple of fowling pieces and the 
spaniels ready in the morning, and they went to Mr. Berkeley's and 
stayed there one night. There his master met with the defendant 
Morgan, and from thence his master and Morgan went to Mr. Fitz- 
herbert's in Staffordshire, where they stayed one night, and then went to 
a gentleman's house near Leigh in Lancashire, but does not remember 
his name, and they stayed there two nights, and then went to Preston, 

H 2 



4SO DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

and stayed all night before the rebels came. He says he and Mr. Morgan's 
servant were ordered by their masters to take the horses to Walton (about 
a mile north of Preston), and, if the rebels came that way, then they were 
to take the horses to a village about four miles further off. About 10 or 
ii o'clock the said Vaughan and Morgan came to the house where the 
witness and the other servant were with the horses ; stayed there all night 
and walked back to Preston next morning. Witness and the other 
servant were directed to stay where they then were till they came again. 
They came again the second night about n o'clock, and next morning 
directed the witness and the other servant to take the portmanteau and 
horses and go to Leigh as aforesaid, but to wait in the road a little way 
short of Leigh until they came to them, and about 4 of the clock in the 
afternoon the said Vaughan and Morgan came to them with each a 
white cockade in his hat, and then went to the same gentleman's house 
at Leigh where they had been, and lay there that night. The next 
morning they went to Manchester with the said cockades in their hats, 
and put up at a constable's behind a church, but does not remember his 
name. He attended his master at supper the second night they lay there, 
and there were the said Mr. Vaughan, Mr. Morgan, and Mr. Murray, the 
secretary to the young Pretender, at supper together. He heard Mr. 
Morgan call him Mr. Murray, and he saw Mr. Murray go in and out of 
said house several times. He says his master and defendant Morgan 
joined the young Pretender's Life Guards, under the command of the 
Lord Elcho, and rode with them from Manchester to Derby. His master 
gave him two guns to carry from Manchester to Derby. When the rebels 
went back to Manchester, his time being out with his master, he left him 
there, and was going when he was taken up and committed to gaol. 

EDGAR HOWE. Defendant and about twenty other rebels eight of 
whom were officers were quartered at my house at Derby about two 
days when the rebel army was there, and defendant told me these eight 
officers always lodged together, and that they were not come to live upon 
him or anybody else, for they would pay for what they had. Defendant 
appeared to be the chiefest person of those quartered at my house, and 
gave all the directions for providing for their entertainment, and gave the 
witness a guinea and three shillings for such entertainment of himself 
and the other rebels, and said he paid him like a gentleman. Defendant 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 45! 

was then publicly called and reputed to be the Prince's (meaning the 
young Pretender's) Counsel. The witness has since seen the defendant 
in Newgate, who told him (the witness) he would come to Derby and see 
him again in spite of King George and all the people in the world, or to 
that purpose. He saw defendant frequently go to the Pretender's lodging, 
and never appeared to be under any restraint while he was at Derby. 

[Found guilty. Executed jotk July, 174.6. His head was placed at 

Temple Bar.] 



JOHN HUNTER. 

SAM. HADDOCK. The defendant told witness he came from London 
with design to join the rebel army, but being suspected he was taken 
prisoner by the rebels at Preston, and carried with them to Derby and 
back again to Preston, when he was released by Captain Sanderson of 
the Manchester regiment. Immediately after he was released he put on 
a white cockade, drank the Pretender's health on his knees, and enlisted 
as an Ensign in the Manchester regiment, and did duty as such upon the 
march from Preston to Carlisle. During the siege of Carlisle by the 
Duke he frequently mounted guard at the Town Hall at the head of 
parties of the Manchester regiment, armed with a broadsword and gun, 
and wore the white cockade. 

JOHN COLLENS. Witness first saw the defendant when he was a 
prisoner to the rebels. After the rebels had released him he put a white 
cockade in his hat, enlisted in the rebel army, and marched from Preston 
to Penrith. 

JOHN VERE. I was carried prisoner with the rebels to Carlisle, and 
the defendant was made an officer in the Manchester regiment in the 
rebels' service at Preston, and marched with them to Carlisle, where he 
was left in garrison. The witness saw him in Carlisle, armed with sword 
and gun, do duty as an officer in defence of the place when it was 
besieged by the Duke. 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. Upon surrender of Carlisle said 
gentlemen and others were appointed by his Royal Highness to view 



452 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

and mark the several rebel officers who defended the town, which they 
did, and know defendant to be one of them. 

Note. Prisoner was forced, he escaped, being pursued for eleven miles, 
and threatened with death unless he returned. 

[Not guilty. Acquitted.} 



JOHN COMERIE. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK. These witnesses were in Carlisle 
when the town was besieged by the Duke, and say defendant was one of 
the rebel officers left in garrison there, and did duty as such during said 
siege, armed with broadsword and pistols. 

C. JOHN DONALDSON, No. 42. I was a private man in garrison in 
Carlisle when it was besieged by the Duke, and defendant was a Captain 
in the rebel service, and defended it as such. I received pay in Carlisle 
from the defendant as my officer. 

C. ALEX. FORBES, No. 47 ; C. JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; C. JOHN 
OGILVY, No. 89. These witnesses testify as to prisoner's presence as an 
officer in Carlisle when besieged. 

DONALD STEWART, No. 103. Testifies as above, and that he saw 
him upon guard at the Scotch gate during the siege. 

La. DAN. FARLAN. Witness was left in garrison in Carlisle by the 
rebels when they marched into England, and stayed until the town 
surrendered to the Duke. Saw the defendant, who was an officer in the 
rebel army, upon guard on the walls near the Irish port. 

La. ISABEL CAMPBELL, No. 72 ; Y. HUGH McDoucAL, No. 60. 
These testify as above. 

WM. MACGniE. I saw the prisoner at Holyrood House at Edinburgh 
with the rebels, and at the head of his company upon the march to 
Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols. Saw him draw up his men in 
the castle of Carlisle, and upon guard, armed as aforesaid. 

[Died before trial.} 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 453 



JAMES STATTON. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK. These witnesses were in Carlisle 
when it was besieged by the Duke of Cumberland, and until it surrendered 
to him, the defendant being the surgeon to the rebel garrison, and acted 
as such during the siege. He marched from Edinburgh. In officers' list 
as a surgeon. 

JOHN CONNOR, No. 36. I was servant to Col. Strickland, and came 
to Carlisle about four days after it surrendered to the rebels. My master 
was. taken ill, and continued there until the rebels came out of England. 
He died three or four days before the town surrendered to the Duke. 
The defendant was surgeon to the rebel garrison, and attended the sick 
and wounded rebels there. 

ISABEL CAMPBELL, No. 72. Testifies as above, and says he appointed 
her to look after the sick. 

WILLIAM MAGGEE ; JOHN ALLEN. As above. 

Chief Justice WILLS. It is objected that it don't appear he had arms. 
All are principals in aiding or assisting, and are parties to levying war, 
and surgeons are necessary ; so are drummers. No proof of his marching 
and the cockade, but a circumstance. Presumptions won't do. 

[Jury acquitted iiim.~\ 



ANDREW WOOD. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 39. While the rebels were in possession of 
Glasgow, it was the general report there that the prisoner had taken on 
with the rebels, and was to have a commission as Captain in Roy Stewart's 
regiment upon condition he should raise 50 men for the rebel service. 
The day after such report I saw him walking with Roy Stewart in the 
town of Glasgow in English habit, but don't remember whether he was 
armed or wore a white cockade. 



454 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOUITK TRIALS. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 39. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at 
Glasgow, and knew very well he had taken on with them. I heard he 
was to have a Captain's commission upon condition of raising 50 men 
for the Pretender's son. Upon 28th December last prisoner took on with 
the rebels, and before that he wore English clothes. He ever after taking 
on with them wore Highland clothes, and broadsword and pistols. I 
often saw him in Glasgow with the rebels, dressed and armed as aforesaid. 
Also saw him along with a party of Roy Stewart's regiment on Speyside 
at the time General Bland was at Strathbogie. I often saw him along 
with John Roy Stewart's regiment at Elchies, where that regiment was 
posted to keep the ford there, and remembers particularly to have seen 
the prisoner there when witness was sent to intercede with John Roy 
Stewart about restoring to one Captain Campbell a watch and some 
guineas which a party of said Stewart's regiment had taken from Mr. 
Campbell at Keith, and I left prisoner with said regiment when I marched 
to Inverness. 

JOHN HAY, No. 50. I was once at Inverness when in the possession 
of the rebels, and saw prisoner along with John Roy Stewart, in whose 
regiment he had a company, dressed in highland clothes, and wearing 
broadsword, and cockade in his bonnet. Two days before the battle of 
Culloden I saw prisoner with Roy Stewart's men at Elgin, dressed as 
aforesaid. 

ALAN STEWART, Tilbury ; Captain EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. These 
gentlemen testify to his presence with the rebels as Captain in Roy 
Stewart's regiment. 

EDWARD SMITH. I saw prisoner with said regiment in arms at 
Fochabers, and believes he was with the detachment under Glascoe at 
Keith. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. I saw prisoner beat up for volunteers at 
Glasgow, and at the battle of Falkirk, at Perth and Nairn. 

JOHN FALCONER. I saw prisoner receive his commission from the 
Pretender's son, and he asked witness to get him some men and a 
serjeant to beat up in defendant's name for volunteers. He was armed 
with a small sword, and wore a white cockade. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 455 

FRANCIS CHALMERS. Testifies as to prisoner joining the rebels at 
Glasgow, that he was made a Captain in Roy Stewart's regiment. I saw 
prisoner with the rebels at Falkirk, and at Rothes in Murray, armed and 
dressed as aforesaid. 

[Guilty. Executed 28th November, 1746.] 



SIR JOHN WEDDERBURN. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 3. I knew the prisoner very well, and saw 
him with the rebels upon the retreat from Stirling on the way to Inverness, 
when part of the rebel army passed over the Tay near Perth. Just after 
the rebels had passed, I saw prisoner join them on the other side with a 
party of Strathallan's horse, he being on horseback, in English dress, 
with a sword by his side and pistols before him. Prisoner, armed as 
aforesaid, marched with a party of Strathallan's horse to Aberdeen. 
Upon the inarch of the rebels from Aberdeen to Old Mcldrum, I saw 
prisoner armed and upon horseback. From Old Mcldrum he marched 
with them to Banff, where I often saw prisoner on foot, armed, and I believe 
he was a volunteer in a squadron of Lord Strathallan's horse, composed 
of gentlemen of fortune. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 9. I saw prisoner with the rebels, and he 
was concerned in levying the excise for their use, but did not wear a 
highland habit. Don't remember whether he wore a sword or a cockade. 
While at Dundee I went one day to Mr. Ogilvie's house, where in a room 
I saw the people of the town paying their excise money to prisoner, but 
don't remember to have seen him marching with any body of men in the 
rebel service. 

HENRY EDWARDS, No. 57. At Perth this witness saw prisoner, when 
Lord Strathallan was governor for the rebels, on his way from Dundee to 
Edinburgh to get his commission as collector of excise for the Pretender 
rectified the prisoner's father's name being inserted by mistake instead 
of Sir John's. Upon prisoner's return to Perth he acted there as collector 
of excise for the Pretender's son, and sent a drum about the town to give 
notice to the people to come and pay it upon military execution. He 



456 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

wore a white cockade, and had a sword by his side. Saw him frequently 
with other rebels there. Proves by receipts that prisoner did collect 
excise on ale and leather in November, December, and January last, in 
parts of Scotland where the rebels were masters. 

JOHN BRUCE. Prisoner collected the excise for the Pretender at 
Brechin a party of rebels being then in the town. Witness paid him 
12/6 for his excise. The prisoner said to witness that he should have 
come sooner, and not have hindered the Prince's men, and added, he had 
a good mind to send and take his boilers away. 

JAMES MORTIMER. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Aberdeen, and 
at Elgin, armed with a broadsword. He was reported to be collector of 
cess in Angus. 

JOHN ADAMSON. Testifies as above, and says he paid his cess twice 
to him at Brechin. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told them he was a volunteer 
in Lord Ogilvie's regiment, and collector of excise at Brechin. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Edinburgh. 
He marched with them to Derby and back. Was in the Pretender's 
Guards at the battle of Falkirk. Saw him with the rebels at Perth and 
Culloden, armed with broadsword and pistols. Some times he wore the 
uniform of the Life Guards, and was at other times in the highland dress. 

JOHN FALCONER ; ALEX. RUSSELL. Saw him in the Pretender's 
Life Guards, and in their uniform at Edinburgh, armed with sword and 

pistols. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDREL. The treason charged is levying war, and the over act 
is being in arms. But two witnesses only speak to his being at Aberdeen, 
and in a common dress, such as the townsmen wear. Entering into the 
rebellion after won't do, for there must be treason at Aberdeen. Cannot 
give evidence of collecting the excise by 7 to 3 it not being laid expressly. 
His father, Sir Alexander, was collector for the King. Lord Ogilvie took 
his horses, and he going after them they carried him by force to collect 
the excise. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 457 

Mr. GORDON. No proof of his being in England. Not a volunteer, 
but a private man proved by Capt. Eyre. 

GEORGE WALKER. The rebels came to Angus-shire in September, 
and took three of the prisoner's horses. Two were brought back. They 
said it was to serve the Prinde. He said he did not intend to give his 
horses for any such uses. They said then he should go, and they seized 
him. He returned in three days, and stayed till latter end of October. 
About November he was taken at Perth. I carried a letter, and the 
guard took it and handed it to him. Had an answer in the afternoon, he 
being to dine with Strathallan. About I2th November he came home 
and stayed a week, when 100 men came at night and carried him off 
to Dundee. Saw his servant in Dundee the Tuesday after. Eight days 
later he came back and stayed till 4th February. Came back ist Decem- 
ber and stayed at home two months. Lord Lewis Gordon's men came 
and carried him off again to Brechin. Saw him in middle of March at 
Elgin. No force used. 

GEORGE MORKER. Witness a farmer's son near Sir John's, which is 
within 14 miles of Perth. Horses taken [and rebels said], D n him, he 
should go wife came out they damned her put him on horse saw 
him at home four days after stayed till middle of October. His servant 
and he rode away together, and nobody with him. Latter end of Novem- 
ber Sunday afternoon. Semple visited house, and took him in running 
away against his will. Wife and children cried. Saw him at Dundee 
guarded on Friday after. Ten days afterwards saw him at his house, and 
he stayed till 5th February, when he was taken away again. [They] 
called him " that deserter dog Wedderburn." He was at home again 
when Falkirk battle was fought. 

JOHN SCOTT. Speaks to theft of horses went on a visit ten days. 

DAVID HUTCHEON. I never heard how he came or got home ; nor 
whilst at home did any come after him. He made several visits for two 
or three nights. 

Mr. Justice WRIGHT. The collecting is proper evidence of the overt 
act laid. 

I 2 



45 8 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Notes. ist November. 10 jurors sworn, and all the rest absent or 
challenged. A jury did not appear, and the court ordered another panel 
at a subsequent date. Those who appeared on the ist were sworn. 
4th November. There being no new panel, the counsel for defendant 
agreed to go on and let the former copy of the panel be deemed good 
service. 

[Information laid at Aberdeen. Guilty. Executed 28th November, 1746.] 



JAMES LINDSAY. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 46. I saw prisoner with the rebels about one 
mile from Edinburgh, at Duddingston after the battle of Prestonpans. 
He was then on horseback and wore highland clothes. He was armed 
with a broadsword, had pistols before him, and wore a white cockade. 
The prisoner was in the same squadron that the witness belonged to in 
Lord Strathallan's horse. That from the camp aforesaid this witness and 
the prisoner marched together to Carlisle along with the rebel army. I 
saw the prisoner in the town of Carlisle, after it was taken by the rebels, 
both on foot and on horseback, in arms, dressed as aforesaid. In the 
march of the rebel army into England I saw prisoner marching along 
almost every day. Saw him constantly in the retreat with the rebel 
army, particularly at Preston, and saw him along with Strathallan's horse 
marching to the engagement at Falkirk, and spoke to him then. Saw 
him often at Glasgow when it was in possession of the rebels. Afterwards 
saw him with Lord Strathallan's horse at Stirling, Perth, and Inverness. 
Also drawn up in rank upon Culloden Moor the day before the engage- 
ment there. 

HENRY EDWARDS. I saw prisoner march out of Perth with Lord 
Ogilvie's regiment, armed and dressed as aforesaid, as one of them. 
Upon the retreat of the rebels out of England I saw prisoner with some 
of the rebels in Perth, and he went as an escort from Glasgow to Castle 
Drummond. He declared he was obliged to join the rebels, because if 
he did not they would not have paid him the money which several of the 
heads of the rebels owed him, and he could not support his family 
without it. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 459 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner informed them he was a 
volunteer in Lord Strathallan's horse. 

ANDREW JOHNSTON. Testifies as to prisoner being a volunteer in 
Kilmarnock's, afterwards Lord Strathallan's, horse, and he saw him at 
Moffat, Carlisle, and often on the march to Derby. At the battle of 
Falkirk, and at Perth, he commanded a party to press horses for the 
rebels. Saw him with them at Fochabers, Elgin, and Culloden, armed 
and dressed as aforesaid. 

HENRY CHEAP. I saw the prisoner first with Lord Ogilvic's regiment 
at Perth ; afterwards in Lord Kilmarnock's horse, and marched with them 
to Carlisle and Derby, armed with a gun and sword ; dressed in highland 
clothes and white cockade. 

JOHN HENDRY. Prisoner was a Captain in the Duke of Perth's 
regiment, and was with them at Musselburgh, armed with broadsword, 
highland dress and white cockade, and believe I saw him drawn up with 
them at Carlisle. 

Mr. CHAS. LESLIE. I saw him with the rebels in October, 1745, at 
Edinburgh, with a white cockade in his hat, and armed with a broadsword. 

DAVID BELL. I first saw the prisoner with the rebels at Cullen and 
Aboyne, mounting guard there and patrolling. Saw him march from 
thence with a party of Glenbucket's men to Fochabers. 

FOA' THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. Prisoner, a shoemaker, engaged with a good intention 
all his stock seized. He declined being in the battle of Falkirk, and 
pleaded sickness. 

PETER CRAWFORD. He is a shoemaker in Perth, and set up 6 years 
ago. Has a wife and three children. Had a good business. Glenbucket 
ordered all shoes to be produced and others made, and sent officers for 
shoes and boots. He said he was to go to Edinburgh to be paid. 
Whilst he was gone another party demanded shoes, and plundered the 
house. He came back to Perth before the rebels and was seized as a 
deserter, and carried away by them. He cried. He was eight days at 
his business before they took him ; about the time of Falkirk battle. 
1 50 -of Strathallan's men were then at Perth. 




460 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JOHN MALCOM. He paid excise to Glenbucket. The shoemakers 
were ordered to work, and he went to Edinburgh for his moneys, and did 
not work on his coming back. 

[Information laid at Carlisle, Cumberland. Found guilty. Reprieved.} 



JOHN HAMILTON. 

JOHN VERE ; SAMUEL MADDOCK ; ROGER MACUONALD. These 
witnesses were in the castle of Carlisle when the same was besieged by 
the Duke, and say the defendant was the Governor thereof for the 
Pretender, and appeared and acted as such walked about the ramparts 
and gave directions to the officers and men then in garrison there, for the 
defence thereof against the King's troops. 

JOHN DONALDSON, No. 42 ; JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; THOS. 
CHALMERS, No. 31 ; JOHN OGILVY, No. 89; ALEX. REACH, No. 91 ; 
DONALD STEWART, No. 103 ; JOHN URQUHART, No. 105 ; WM. 
MAGGEE, No. 7 ; ISABEL CAMPBELL, No. 72 ; ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125 ; 
ARCH. LAUDER, No. 131 ; JOHN ALLEN, No. 2. These witnesses were 
all private men, and were left in garrison in Carlisle by the rebels when 
their army marched from thence to Scotland, and defendant was the 
Governor of the castle at that time and continued there ; was called, 
appeared and acted as Governor thereof in defending the same when it 
was besieged by the King's forces under the Duke of Cumberland. 

ALEX. FORBES, No. 47. I was a servant to the defendant, and some 
time after the battle of Prestonpans the defendant told me he was going 
to serve the Prince, meaning the young Pretender, then in Scotland, and 
I must go with him. I declined, and the defendant told me Glenbucket 
was taking up all the men thereabouts, and if I did not go with the 
defendant I must be obliged to go with Glenbucket, and carry arms. If 
I went with the defendant I would have nothing to do but look after his 
horses, upon which I went with him, and carried his cloakbag behind me to 
Aberdeen. From thence we went with a party of the rebels to Edinburgh, 
and afterwards to Carlisle. Defendant marched with the rebel army from 
Dalkeith to Carlisle armed with sword and pistols, and went to the trenches 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 461 

to see how the siege was carried on by the rebels. After the town was taken 
I went into it with the defendant, who was then Governor, and continued 
and acted as Governor when it was besieged by the Duke. I received 
my pay of 8d. a-day at Carlisle from the defendant. 

DANIEL MACFARLIN, No. 15. I was made to lead one of the rebels' 
baggage horses to Carlisle, where I was left when they marched further 
into England. I there had a gun given me by order of the defendant, 
with which I was obliged to mount guard in Carlisle. 

WM. WILLS, No. 1 10. Defendant was left in garrison in Carlisle 
when the rebels marched from thence into England, and I received pay 
at that time from Captain Thomas Ogilvie, some of which money I saw 
Captain Ogilvie receive from the defendant as Governor of Carlisle. 

HUGH M C DUGALL, No. 60. I was kept in Carlisle when the rebel 
army was in England, and defendant asked me if I would swear to be 
true to the Prince (meaning as witness believed the young Pretender), and 
if I would do so I should have a commission. I refused, and was put in 
confinement in the guard room, but soon afterwards had liberty again. 
Defendant continued Governor of Carlisle till the rebel army came back. 
Then I was again confined until they marched to Scotland, was set at 
liberty, but was again taken up by some of the Manchester regiment, 
under pretence of holding correspondence with the English army. I was 
carried to the castle guard and confined some days. Defendant sent me 
to the town gaol, from whence the captain of the town guard sent me to 
the county gaol in Carlisle, where I was kept till the town surrendered to 
the Duke. 

ROGER MACDONALD. I saw the prisoner upon the march in Scotland 
with a squadron of Lord Pitsligo's horse in the rebel army, and saw him 
several times in Carlisle when he was Governor thereof for the Pretender. 

JOHN URQUHART. I saw defendant along with the rebels at Edin- 
burgh, on horseback, armed with a broadsword. 

WM. MACGHIE. The defendant came to join the rebels at a camp at 
Duddingston, armed with sword and pistols. Afterwards I saw him on 
foot with the rebels at Edinburgh with a sword by his side. He marched 
with the rebels to Carlisle. He was Governor of Carlisle for the Pretender, 



462 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

and lived in the Governor's house. The rebels were drawn up every day 
in the castle before his house, and he reviewed them. He was frequently 
upon the ramparts, with a sword by his side, the day before the King's 
forces came before the town. Defendant gave orders to the gunners to 
have all things in readiness. That the guns from the castle fired forty- 
eight hours upon the King's army, and whilst the guns were so firing 
defendant was busy giving orders to the soldiers in the castle. 

JOHN DAVISON. I live in Carlisle, and was there when the rebels 
took it ; defendant was made Governor of it when the rebels marched 
into England. I applied to him as such to let me have a gate opened 
to let horses pass through. I was frequently in Hamilton's company, 
and often heard him when speaking of His Majesty call him the Elector 
of Hanover, and frequently heard him drink to the speedy landing of a 
king by which I believe he meant the Pretender, because I never heard 
him nor any of the rebels in Carlisle call His Majesty king. 

Capt. CAREY. When Carlisle surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland 
the defender as Governor surrendered himself, garrison and papers, to the 
Duke. Among the papers he delivered his commission to me, which is 
under the hand and seal of the Pretender to this effect : 

" Charles P.R. 

" Charles, Prince of Wales, &c., Regent of England, Scotland, France, 
"and Ireland, and the Dominions thereunto belonging. 

" To our Trusty and Well-beloved, John Hamilton, Esquire. We, 
" reposing especial Trust and Confidence in your courage, loyalty, and 
" good conduct, Do hereby Constitute and Appoint you Governor and 
" Commander of the Town, Castle, and Citadel of Carlisle, from the date 
" hereof, with power, &c. Given at Carlisle, the I4th day of November, 

" 1 745-" 

I also took from defendant his instructions, dated 2Oth November, 
1745, which were given him for his conduct in the defence of the place, 
and which are signed by John Murray, as secretary to the young Pretender. 

I also took from defendant a letter from Secretary Murray, dated the 
2 ist November, 1745, directed to John Hamilton, Esquire, Governor of 
Carlisle, signifying that His Royal Highness recommends [that] he enquires 
narrowly about the sick people at Carlisle, and either to take them into 
the castle or forward them to the army, and to do his utmost to intercept 
deserters. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 463 

I took another paper from the defendant, being a letter under his 
hand, dated 3Oth December last, directed to Captain George Abernethy 
and Robert Forbes, empowering them to wait upon the officers besieging 
Carlisle, in order to capitulate. 

The following papers were then taken out of a cloakbag in the house 
of one Francis Hewit in Carlisle, which cloakbag was shown to defendant, 
who owned it to be his : 

(i.) A letter dated 2Oth November, 1745, signed Charles P.R., and 
directed to Colonel John Hamilton, Governer of the castle and city of 
Carlisle, requiring him to raise a regiment of dragoons, to be called the 
Royal Scots Greys, and to collect the publick monies in Cumberland, 
Westmoreland, and Northumberland, and in the most contiguous parts 
of Scotland, and to provide the garrison with provisions. 

(2.) " By John Hamilton, Governor of Carlisle, for His Royal Highness 
" the Prince Regent. 

" Permit Francis Hewit, Merchant in Carlisle, to pass and rcpass. 

"Jo. HAMILTON. 
"To all His Royal Highnesses Officers, Civil and Military." 

(3.) A recognizance of Isaac Brown, the younger, and surety taken 
before the defendant as Governor of Carlisle, in the penalty of 1000 lib., 
and signed by the defendant, upon condition that Isaac Brown, the younger, 
appear before our Sovereign Lord the King, or the Prince Regent, or 
before the Governor of Carlisle for the time within forty-eight hours 
after notice, and to answer such matters as shall then and there be 
objected against him. And that if he do not depart without leave, then 
this recognizance to be void, otherwise to be and remain in full force 
and virtue. 

(4.) Another paper, dated ipth November, 1745, beginning, "Charles, 
Prince of Wales, &c., Regent of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, 
and the Dominions thereunto belonging. To all the high and Petty 
Constables within the County of Cumberland. These are requiring, &c., 
to obey the orders of John Hamilton, Esquire, our Governor of the town, 
Castle, and Citadel of Carlisle, upon pain of Military Execution." 

Capt. KNEVIT ; Capt. CRAIG. These gentlemen were ordered by His 
Royal Highness, upon the surrender of Carlisle, to view and mark the 
several rebel officers, so as to be able to know them again, which they did, 
and know the defendant to be one of them. 



464 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Mr. CHAS. LESLIE. I saw prisoner in Edinburgh, in October, 1745, 
armed with a broadsword, and white cockade, commanding a party of 
men in the rebel army. 

JOHN WILLIAM. Prisoner was Governor of Carlisle, and the rebels 
were drawn up before his door, and he gave orders to the gunners to fire 
as fast as they could upon the Duke's battery, which was being raised 
against the castle. 

CHARLES HENDRV. He was in highland dress. 

[22Jid October, 1746. Withdrew his plea of not guilty, and pleaded guilty. 
Executed zStli November, 1746.} 



GEORGE AliERNETIIV. 

JOHN VERE ; SAMUEL MADDOCK. These witnesses say defendant 
was one of the rebel officers left in Carlisle when they marched from 
thence to Scotland, and that he did duty as an officer in defence of the 
place against the King's forces, armed with sword and pistols. 

JOHN URQUHART, No. 105 ; ALEX. REACH, No. 91. Defendant was 
an officer in Glcnbucket's regiment, with which he marched from Dalkeith 
to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols, with colours flying, and pipes 
playing before them as they marched through towns upon the road. 
These witnesses were left in garrison in Carlisle when the rebels marched 
to Scotland, and defendant acted as an officer in garrison there, did duty 
as such, and was armed with sword and pistols, and defended the castle 
against the King's forces. 

JOHN FRAZER, No. 48 ; ALEX. FORBES, No. 47 ; THOS. CHALMERS, 
No. 31; JOHN DONALDSON, No. 42 ; WM. MAGGEE, No. 7. All these 
testify to defendant's presence as a rebel officer in Carlisle, armed with 
sword and pistols. 

DANIEL MACFARLAN, No. 15. I saw prisoner mount guard as a 
rebel officer at the Irish port in Carlisle. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 465 

WILLIAM WILLS, No. no ; ALEX. IRVINE, No. 125 ; ARCH. LAUDER, 
No. 131; HUGH MACDUGALL, No. 60; JOHN ALLAN, No. 2. These 
witnesses declare prisoner was a rebel officer in garrison in Carlisle, and 
they saw him walking about the ramparts observing that the sentinels 
did their duty, mount guard, and among other rebel officers when cannon 
were fired from the castle upon the Duke's army. 

CHAS. HENDRY. Prisoner commanded a party of rebels in Carlisle 
in getting stores and provisions for the castle. He was dressed in high- 
land dress, white cockade, and armed with sword and pistols. 

THOS. GORDON ; JOHN MACKINSON ; JOHN WILLIAMSON. These 
witnesses testify to prisoner's presence in Carlisle as storekeeper. 

JOHN DAVISON. I frequently saw prisoner in the castle yard of 
Carlisle when it was in possession of the rebels, and he usually wore a 
heavy sword and pistol in his girdle. Prisoner commanded a party 
who searched the town for provisions. Witness upon the approach of 
the Duke's army went to the castle to ask for a couple of sentinels to 
stand at his door, apprehending that the town that night would be 
plundered by the rebels. Prisoner was that night upon guard at the 
castle, and told witness they could not spare any men. 

FOK THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDREL. The defendant was a merchant at Banff, and bailie 
of the town. When Cope wanted to be shipped for south of Scotland, 
he sent Rogers to provide ships. He went through Banff, and could not 
get horses for Aberdeen at the Post Office, and the prisoner procured 
him one as necessary for His Majesty's service. When Cope came to 
Banff he furnished him with carriages. This soon became known to the 
rebels, who came and took him prisoner, and carried him to Glcnbucket's 
quarters. His wife could not get a letter to him. He was carried away 
a prisoner. 

Mr. GORDON. Tis prima facie a presumption against defendant. 
Shall prove an original force. There is a difference between marching 
and being in company, and actual acts of hostility. Shall shew how 
those retaken were used, and from thence infer the terror. 

K 2 



466 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Sir JOHN COPE. I sent Captain Rogers from Inverness with letters 
to get ships at Aberdeen. Rogers is killed. I marched through Banff 
and was furnished with carriages by the Magistrates, but can't speak to 
prisoner's person. I sent to the Magistrates as the proper persons. I 
had noo men. 

JAMES RAILLY. I have known prisoner 24 years at Banff. He was 
a bailie (Provost is chief magistrate), but often he has the gout. He is 
about 40 years old. Rogers came to Banff, but on bad horses. Prisoner 
saw him and said, " It is the King's officer, I must see what he wants, and 
if he needs horses." He soon came back, and bade me go with him and 
get horses for the Captain, for there was great difficulty. Found some 
leading corn, and cut the harness, and drove them to the Post house, and 
they went. Prisoner and Rogers drank a bottle whilst saddling, and sent 
a boy who knew the way to avoid the rebels. When Cope came, prisoner, 
as one of the three bailies, got him carriages one at Londrew (?) and 
the other not in .... there were more procured than wanted. 
A week after the rebels took the prisoner they pillaged for armour, and 
20 or 30 came to the prisoner's house, and went in and soon came out 
holding him. He cried what they took him for, and they said he was a 
whig villain, and should go with them. He asked why, and they said he 
put Rogers out of their way, and they were deprived of his papers. He 
said he would do it again. Then they carried him to Glenbucket's 
quarters. Next morning they put him on a bare horse. They would 

not let his wife see him, and bade her go home for a whig , or else 

they would fire her house. He was carried away, although he and she 
offered all they had to leave him. He cried out most vehemently, and 
had no arms or whip. One Highlander led the horse and another drove 
him. Between four and five hundred carried him away. Rogers said he 
would take care the Government would reward the prisoner. 

ALEX. GILL. Prisoner was very unwilling to go with them. They 
said they would make him suffer for it, and in general witness confirmed 
the above evidence as to carrying him away. 

JOHN FIOTT. Witness was a servant to prisoner. Sent by the wife 
to prisoner at Strathbogie with a letter . . . cut my hand and would 
not let me do it. Saw him carried away surrounded by rebels. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 467 

ANNE GRAHAM. Witness is a servant at the Grapes, Carlisle, where 
prisoner lodged. 

JOHN VERE. Witness was prisoner on the King's side at Carlisle. 
Upon 2 1st December he told me he wondered the Duke did not summons 
the town, and I said the Duke would not treat with them, and he said he 
was sorry. I advised they should draw up an instrument desiring the 
Governor to surrender. 

CHIEF JUSTICE. Here are sufficient overt acts of high treason 
proved. The single question is whether there is excusing force must 
depend upon the whole circumstances. No evidence of force after 
Strathbogie, or during last end of September, all October, November, 
and December. Strong evidence that by being employed they did not 
distrust him. 

[Found guilty. Recommended by the jury to mercy. Reprieved.} 



THOMAS WATSON. 

TllOMAS ARMSTRONG, I saw the prisoner with the rebels in England, 
particularly on the march into Preston with Ogilvie's first battalion, armed 
with broadsword and pistols, and a white cockade in his bonnet. Saw 
him with the rebels at Stirling, Perth, Aberdeen, Fochabers, and upon 
Culloden Moor the day before the battle, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

JOHN BRUCE. The prisoner was an officer in Lord Ogilvie's regiment, 
and I saw him before the battle of Prestonpans, with the men he had 
raised abroad, in Angus, to join the rebel army. He was then armed 
with sword and pistols, and wore the highland dress, and cockade. This 
witness was on board a ship in Cromarty bay with the prisoner, and 
upbraided him for joining in the rebellion. Prisoner said it had cost him 
100 in raising the few men he did, and it could not be helped. 

WILLIAM TODD ; ROBERT MACKAY. Prisoner was a Lieutenant in 
Lord Ogilvie's regiment, and marched with the rebels through Brechin, 
dressed in highland dress, and armed as aforesaid. Saw him with him 
afterwards at Fochabers and at Elgin. 



468 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner informed these gentlemen, 
upon his examination at Inverness, that he was a Lieutenant in Lord 
Ogilvie's regiment. 

{Information laid at Perth. Found guilty. Reprieved^ 



JOHN FARQUHARSON. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 32. I saw Colonel Farquharson's regiment 
inarch from Inverness to Nairn to reinforce the rebels who were then at 
Elgin to oppose the Duke of Cumberland in passing the Spey. In this 
march I saw prisoner, who was Captain in the regiment, marching along 
with it on foot, in highland dress, but does not remember whether he was 
armed or whether he had a white cockade. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 34. I saw the prisoner with other rebels at 
Stirling, some days before the battle of Falkirk, when the town of Stirling 
was in possession of the rebels. He was then in highland dress, with 
broadsword and pistols by his side, and cockade in his bonnet. Saw him 
with his men at the moor of Bannockburn, when the rebels were reviewed 
two days before the battle of Falkirk. I saw him afterwards with the 
rebels at Inverness, armed as aforesaid. He was at the head of the 
Farquharson regiment, upon the field of battle at Culloden, which was 
then preparing to attack the King's forces. 

Capt. CAMPBELL. During the time the rebels were in Edinburgh, 
I saw Captain John Farquharson dressed and armed as aforesaid, but 
don't know what command he had in the rebel army. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. The prisoner told them his name, and 
that he was Captain in Farquharson's regiment in the rebel army. 

JOHN REACH. Prisoner was a Captain in the Duke of Perth's regiment, 
and was with them at Edinburgh mounted guard there as a captain 
likewise at Peebles and Moffat, in highland dress, armed with sword and 
pistols. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 469 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Affidavits were put in by Thomas Forbes to put off the trial until the 
arrival of the witnesses for defence. The court would not put off the trial. 

[Information laid at Inverness, Withdrew plea and pleaded guilty. 

Reprieved.} 

HECTOR MACKENZIE. 

DONALD MUNRO; DONALD FRASER. Prisoner marched from the 
first with Lord Cromartie's regiment to Perth. He was in the regiment 
at the battle of Falkirk, and constantly with it everywhere else. He 
marched with said regiment into Caithness to raise men for the Pretender, 
and retired with it to Dunrobin Castle, where he was taken prisoner with 
the rest of the officers of that regiment. 

HUGH Ross. I saw the prisoner, who was an officer in Lord 
Cromartie's regiment, with the said regiment at Perth, before the battle 
of Falkirk, in highland dress and white cockade, armed with sword and 
pistols. Saw him with said regiment at Bannockburn, and marching 
with them to the battle of Falkirk. Also upon the retreat to Aberdeen, 
and at Thurso in Caithness. 

DUNCAN MACDONALD. I saw prisoner on guard at Perth before the 
battle of Falkirk, in highland dress and white cockade, armed as aforesaid. 
Along with one Roderick Mackenzie he confined witness at Perth one 
night on suspicion of his bringing letters from His Majesty's army. 

HECTOR CAMPBELL. I saw the prisoner along with Lord Cromartie's 
regiment upon their expedition at Thurso in Caithness, and also several 
times upon the march from thence to Dunrobin Castle. 

GEORGE SINCLAIR. Testifies as above, and says that the party were 
drawn up at Thurso before they left that place to see if all the men were 
there^ and then saw prisoner with all the rest of the Mackenzies present 
on that day. There was a town guard kept at Thurso, and prisoner and 
the rest of the Mackenzies mounted guard there alternately. Heard the 
prisoner boasting of his being at the battle of Falkirk, and of the victory 
there. He was an Ensign in Cromartie's regiment. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. He told these gentlemen that he was 
an Ensign in said regiment. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDREL. Prisoner went home after Falkirk and was forced out 
again into Caithness. 

JAMES ROBINSON, minister of Loch Broom. Prisoner was a forester 
to Lord Cromartie. All the men were called, and we expected for the 
King, but Lord Cromartie was uncertain, and we suspected a little. The 
men were raised to guard Cromarty from rebels. Refused to shew the 
orders. I found it was to join the rebels, and prisoner, alarmed, said, 
" it was a trick and a snake in the grass, and for his share he would not 
join the rebels, though he would guard his master from them. He carried 
off the men." The alarm was taken up, and the people were told he was 
a liar and came back, and were carried to Lord Cromartie. In three or 
four days they found their mistake and came back, and said they would 
not go into the rebellion. Then came threatenings of military execution. 
He came home ist March, after sermon, and said it was the third time of 
his escape. About I2th March the chiefs of Lord Cromartie's [regiment] 
brought burning orders, which I saw, under Lord Cromartie's hand. His 
cattle were taken, and when he came to plead for them they took him 
prisoner, and sent back the cattle. They said they would make him 
smart for deserting, because they could not trust him. I had an express 
from Lord Loudoun with private letters to forward ; they came by day 
light, and they and I were taken. I saved the letters and put them into 
a safe hand, and they carried me to the guard, and there I found the 
prisoner kept. I was forced to guard my house, and they took servants 
away. I was threatened, but at prisoner's request was let go. My three 
servants were carried away, and are now in Tilbury fort, but I have an 
order for their discharge. 

EVVAN MACLEOD ; JOHN MACKAY. A party came and prisoner 
absconded. He was carried away in October. He was seized again in 
March at my house. They said they would part with his cattle in 
compassion to his wife ; but he should go like a scoundrel, and be done 
with as Lord Cromartie pleased. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 471 

Justice FOSTER. It must be personal force, not to avoid burning 
house or destroying cattle, for these are inconveniences which a good 
subject must submit to, and not go into rebellion to save such effects. 
It must as a personal force be such as may shew a reasonable fear of 
death, if not complied with, and a retiring as soon as one can. 

The oath may be laid out of the case, for no man is bound to keep it, 
being inconsistent with his oath of allegiance. The case cited is only of 
an oath to keep safely effects they had got. This may be matter of 
compassion, but does not amount to a legal defence, unless the jury think 
it was pro timore mortis. 

[Information laid at Falkirk in shire of Stirling: Found guilty. 

Pardoned.] 



ALEXANDER LEATII. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK ; ALEX. REACH. These witnesses 
were in Carlisle when it was besieged by the Duke, and they saw defendant, 
who was one of the rebel officers left in garrison there to defend the same 
against the King's forces. He was called and acted as captain in the 
castle of Carlisle, among several other of the rebel officers and soldiers, 
armed with broadsword and pistols. 

JOHN URQUHART. Testifies as above, and says further he received 
the pay of 6d. a day in Carlisle from the defendant, as his officer. He 
was with them as an officer on the march to Derby. 

THOMAS CHALMERS, No. 31 ; JOHN FRASER, No. 48 ; ALEX. FORBES, 
No. 37 ; JOHN OGILVY, No. 89. These say defendant was in Carlisle 
when it was besieged by the Duke, and he was called and appeared as a 
Captain, and did duty as such in defence of the places against the King's 
forces. 

JOHN ALLEN, No. 2 ; WM. WILLS, No. 1 10 ; ARTH. LAUDER, No. 131; 
DONALD STEWART, No. 103 ; WM. MACGEE, No. 7. These testify to 
his being an officer in Carlisle, and was among the rebel officers when the 
guns were fired upon the King's forces. 



472 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

EDWARD CHEW. The prisoner was a Captain in the rebel army, and 
was quartered at my house in Preston. He was armed, and marched out 
of Preston at the head of his company, which company was next to that 
along with which the young Pretender marched. 

JOHN DAVISON. The defendant, upon my application to the Governor, 
opened the Scotch gate for my horse to pass through. 

CHAS. LESLIE. I saw him armed, &c., in Edinburgh, in October, 1745, 
with the rebels. 



FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. GORDON. Admitted he acted as Captain and paid the men at 
Carlisle. 

JAMES LEITH. Glenbucket sent out orders for all tenants to appear, 
under military execution. Prisoner offered one guinea, but Glenbucket 
said he would not take it but from those not fit to go not from him. 
He went down and went away, and Glenbucket said he would be even 
with him. 

JAMES GRAY. He was seized in the field, and put on his horse. He 
threw himself three times off, and then they tied him on. He could 
have conquered twenty. 

WM. INGRAM. I was summoned, and prisoner was seized by sixteen 
men. He would have fought them all. 

JOHN URQUHART. At Edinburgh he said, " I don't like this work. 
I don't care to travel, and will go back." He refused to drink confusion 
to George's will. 

HUGH GORDON. Prisoner was confined in the Canongate a week 
after Prestonpans action, and the guards said it was for attempting to 
escape. 

[Found guilty. Executed zStk November, 1746.} 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 473 

JAMES BRADSHAW. 

SAM. MADDOCK. The prisoner took on with the rebels at Manchester, 
and was at their meetings there to raise a regiment for the Pretender. He 
was made a Captain in said regiment, and marched with the rebels to 
Derby, and back to Carlisle, armed with sword and pistols. He wore a 
plaid sash and white cockade. At Carlisle he left the Manchester regiment, 
and escaped with the rebel army to Scotland. 

JAMES SCOTT. Prisoner, on the retreat of the rebels from Carlisle to 
Scotland, was a soldier in Lord Elcho's troop of horse, which was called 
the " Pretender's Life Guards." I saw him with said regiment at Carlisle, 
and afterwards at Elgin and Forres. Sometimes he was dressed in blue, 
faced with red, the uniform of the troop, and at other times in highland 
dress, armed with broadsword, wearing a white cockade. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 42. I first saw the prisoner near Falkirk, with 
the Pretender's Life Guards, dressed in blue coat, turned up with red 
the uniform of the troop. Afterwards I saw him marching on horseback, 
with his sword by his side, up to the battle of Falkirk against the King's 
troops, along with Lord Elcho's horse. Also saw him upon the guard at 
Culloden House, where the Pretender's son lodged. Afterwards at 
Culloden Moor, on foot, the day of the battle there. He had then quitted 
the horse and joined the clans, and I believe he had on a highland habit, 
and sword by his side. 

Lieut. MOORE of Battereau's Regiment. In the pursuit of the rebel 
army after the battle of Culloden, I saw the prisoner taken by a party of 
Kingston's horse and Battereau's foot, and saw him a long time ago. at 
Manchester, when I was recruiting there. 

BEN. BOOKER. On 28th November last, when the van of the rebel 
army came to Manchester, I saw the prisoner along with them, at the 
" Bull's Head Inn," with white cockade in his hat, but did not observe 
him with arms, and believe he took on with them that night. 

WM. REID. The prisoner was a volunteer in Lord Elcho's horse, and 
was with them at Glasgow after they returned from England, and after- 
wards at Lord Elphinstone's house, near Falkirk, before the battle there. 

L 2 



474 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Saw him afterwards with them at Aberdeen and Speyside. Also at Elgin 
with said regiment, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

HUGH ROSS. I saw the prisoner frequently marching with Lord 
Elcho's horse in the rebel army in Scotland, particularly at Elgin in 
Murray, when the Pretender's son was there, dressed in long blue clothes 
turned up with red, and a shoulder-belt mounted with tartan, with a white 
cockade in his hat, and sword by his side. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut MOORE. Prisoner informed these gentlemen 
that he was a volunteer in Lord Elcho's horse. 

EDWARD GIBSON. I saw the prisoner in Lord Elcho's horse and 
uniform, armed with broadsword and pistols, when they were reviewed by 
Lord Elcho at Elgin. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. FORD. Defect of understanding the circumstances, in the evidence 
otherwise unaccountable, for he was entirely mad. (i) It don't appear 
that he said anything at the meeting. (2) He never kept with his company. 
(3) Would not be reviewed. (4) Leaving Carlisle. (5) Degraded from a 
captain to a common man. (6) Different accounts of himself to the two 
captains. In 1745 he was made apprentice, and got married. He pulled 
his wife about, and leapt out of the window. He left his wife three 
weeks, which increased his disorder, and he had to be strapped down in 
bed the day before he joined the rebels. He got up in the night and cut 
his face against the window. He cannot be said to have entered the 
rebellion cooly and deliberately nor inconsiderately. 

'Mr. JODDREL. His acts whilst mad are to be presumed contrary to 
what he was disposed to at other times. 

THOMAS PUERDESSEL. I live in London a Manchester trader. 
Defendant was apprentice with me, and my bedfellow. The first night 
he jumped out of bed, and ran about the room. In 1742 I lay with him. 
He said, " You know I am failing, pray watch me." He did his master's 
business sometimes and at others not. He has struck me during the day. 
He makes entries in the shop books, and has come up to town several 
times within two months of the rebellion. He was not mad then. 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 475 

JOSEPH MONK. I knew prisoner 14 years, and he lodged at my house 
when he came to town. I heard noises in his room in the night time, and 
a strap was provided for his bed. 

CHAS. NEWDIGATE. At times he has been unfit for business, and 
would have me look into his books. He owed me 700 or .800. I was 
called up one night, he having jumped out of the window, and found him 
in the kitchen, faint, cut, and bleeding. He was fond of his wife, and was 
much worse since her death. Have dealt with him for 1000. 

Rev. WM. WORTHINGTON, his brother-in-law. Prisoner is sometimes 
out of his mind. Have heard him say he walked in his sleep, and have 
helped to strap him down to prevent his hurting himself in his sleep. 

JANE RICHARDSON, servant to prisoner. He whistled when he heard 
of his son's death three years ago, and he carried straps about with him 
because he was mad. 

[Information laid at Carlisle. Found guilty. Executed 2St/i Nov., 1746.} 



WALTER MITCHELL. 

JOHN VERE ; SAMUEL MADDOCK. They saw the prisoner in Carlisle 
when the town was besieged by the Duke of Cumberland, armed with a 
firelock and brace of pistols. Also mounting guard at the castle gate at 
the head of parties of the Scots rebels, and do duty as an officer. He 
wore the highland habit, blue bonnet and white cockade. 

JOHN FRASER; JOHN WHITE. These witnesses were forced away 
by Captain Murray of the Duke of Perth's regiment, and were taken 
with several others to the rebel camp at Duddingston. Afterwards to 
Dalkeith, when they marched with the said regiment to Carlisle, with 
colours, drums, and pipes. Defendant was Adjutant to said regiment, 
and marched with them. He did duty as a rebel officer at Carlisle when 
it was besieged by the Duke. 

ALEX. REACH ; WM. MAGGEE ; ALLAN . These testify to 
prisoner's presence with the rebels in defence of Carlisle, &c. 



476 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

X. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

ALEX. KENNY. I am 17 years of age. The barn was burned, and 
prisoner was taken away in a violent manner. They fired at him and 
intended to kill him. His mother offered all she had. 

WM. YoUNKSON. He fled from Aberdeen to his mother's. Ten 
guineas was offered, but they would not take it, because his mother sent 
corn to Cope. 

GEORGE CAY. I saw prisoner at Montrose, he (witness) being taken 
and made prisoner ; and saw his head cut. He said he wanted to get back. 

ALLAN STEWART. I saw prisoner at Carlisle drawn up, and I 
attempted to speak to him. 

\Guilty. Reprieved.} 

GEORGE RAMSAY. 

JOHN VERE ; SAM. MADDOCK ; JOHN URQUHART; ALEX. FORBES. 
These witnesses declare that when the town and castle of Carlisle were 
besieged by the Duke of Cumberland the defendant was an Ensign in 
the rebel army, and they saw him frequently mount guard at the castle 
gate, at the head of several parties of rebels. He was armed with 
broadsword, dirk, and pistols, and wore the highland dress. He was 
only a private man with the rebels at Derby. 

JOHN FRAZER. Prisoner marched with the Duke of Perth's regiment 
from Dalkeith to Carlisle, armed as aforesaid, with colours flying, drums 
beating, and pipes playing. 

FOR THE DEFENCE. 

Mr. JODDREL. No act of hostility proved against prisoner, who was 
a wheelwright at Strathbogie. 

WM. INGRAM. I saw the highlanders take prisoner, and his wife 
made a din after him. 

ALEX. RENNY. Prisoner was unwilling to go. 
\Guilty. Reprieved^ 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 477 



SIR JAMES KINLOCH. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 9. I was servant to Maj'or Glascoe in the 
rebel service, and marched with him from Dundee to Stirling. Upon the 
march, about five miles from Dundee, we overtook the prisoner, who then 
had the command of the second battalion of Lord Ogilvie's regiment. 
They marched together to Stirling, and arrived the day before the battle 
of Falkirk. On that march the prisoner was on horseback ; wore a 
highland habit, with white cockade, and was armed. Afterwards I 
frequently saw prisoner at Stirling, along with said battalion, when the 
rebels were in possession of the town. Saw prisoner march with said 
battalion to Fochabers and Inverness. On the I5th of April I saw the 
whole rebel army drawn up on Culloden Moor, expecting the Duke of 
Cumberland, at which time the prisoner was in arms. 

ROGER MACDONALD, No. 47. While Lord Ogilvie's regiment lay at 
the Speyside in the new barracks opposite Fochabers, I passed over the 
Spey with the prisoner from Fochabers to the barracks. Prisoner was 
then dressed in highland habit, and had a broadsword under his arm. 
There was a party of the King's troops then at Strathbogie, and there 
were three regiments of the rebels then at Speyside, viz., Ogilvie's, Roy 
Stewart's, and Chisholm's, with Fitz-James's Horse and the Scotch 
Hussars at Fochabers, and Lord Strathallan's Hcrse guarding a ford. 
I am sure I saw prisoner in other places marching with the rebel army, 
but cannot recollect where. Saw the prisoner frequently with the rebel 
troops at Fochabers in the highland dress, also with the rebels on the 
march into England, and thinks he was then in the Pretender's Life Guards. 

THOS. ARMSTRONG. I saw the prisoner with the rebels at Stirling 
soon after the battle of Falkirk in highland dress, with white cockade. 
He was Lieut-Col, of the second battalion of Ogilvie's regiment, and 
was active in the trenches during the siege of Stirling Castle by the rebels. 
Saw him afterwards with the rebels at Aberdeen, and upon Culloden 
Moor the day before the battle. 

ALEX. SMITH. Testifies as above, and says, " I saw him at Brechin, 
Fochabers and Elgin, dressed in highland clothes, and armed with sword 
and pistols." 



478 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

CHAS. MATHER. I saw prisoner with the rebels at Stirling, Aberdeen, 
and at the barracks over against Fochabers, armed with sword and pistols, 
and wore a white cockade. 

JOHN BRUCE. I saw prisoner march with the rebels into Brechin in 
highland dress, armed as aforesaid. 

ROBT. NAIRN ; JOHN COWE ; HUGH Ross. Witnesses saw prisoner 
with the rebels at Montrose, and march from thence to Fochabers at the 
head of his battalion. 

WM. ToDD. I saw prisoner at Stirling, and upon the march from 
thence through Perth, Aberdeen, and Fochabers, armed and dressed as 
aforesaid. 

ROBERT MACKAY. I saw him at Brechin, Fochabers, and Nairn with 
the rebels. 

WALTER YOUNG. The prisoner was with his battalion at Montrose, 
while the rebels were in England, armed and dressed as aforesaid. 
Afterwards at Stirling, Aberdeen, Fochabers, and Elgin, always acting 
as Lieut-Col, of said battalion. 

ROBERT IRONS. I saw prisoner at Montrose, Aberdeen, and Spey- 
side, dressed and armed as aforesaid. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. Prisoner told these gentlemen his 
name, and that he was Lieut.-Col. in Lord Ogilvie's regiment. 

[Information laid at Focliabers in Murray. Pleaded guilty. Reprieved] 



FRANCIS FARQUIIARSON OF MONALTRIE. 

JOHN VERB. I saw the gentleman called Colonel Farquharson who 
commanded the Farquharsons. I did not know him before, nor his 
Christian name, nor the addition of Monaltrie. I saw him upon the 
march with the rebels, commanding the Farquharsons, as Was generally 
understood, in December last, and he acted as the other rebel colonels did. 

ALAN STEWART, No. 31. I know the prisoner very well. I have 
often seen him marching along with the rebel army, particularly at 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 479 

Inverness. He was then dressed in a short coat, with trouse made of 
tartan. Some days before the battle of Culloden I remember to have 
seen said Colonel Francis Farquharson with a big blue coat on, at the 
head of his own regiment, which was then drawn out with Ardshiel's 
regiment, and some of the Macleods, upon a plain about a mile from 
Inverness, and that they went through their exercise and were reviewed 
by the Pretender's son. 

ROGER MACDONALD. Before the battle of Falkirk, and during the 
time that Stirling Castle was besieged by the rebels, I remember that 
Colonel Farquharson's regiment of Foot was along with the rebels in the 
town of Stirling, and prisoner with it, dressed as aforesaid. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 13. In the town of Stirling, whilst it was in 
possession of the rebels, a person was shewn to me as Colonel Francis 
Farquharson, Colonel of the Farquharsons. That the person so shewn 
was a tall man with a thin face, and dressed in highland habit, with a 
sword by his side. To the best of my remembrance he was at the head 
of the Farquharsons upon Culloden Moor, along with Captain John 
Farquharson, before the battle began. 

JAMES Ross, No. 20. Col. Francis Farquharson had the command 
of one of Lord Lewis Gordon's battalions, but I never saw him at the 
head of his battalion. 

Capt. CAMPBELL, No. 52. During the time the rebels were at 
Edinburgh I saw Col. Farquharson several times armed, wearing a white 
cockade, but did not know that he had command of the Farquharsons. 

JOHN CowiE. I am a farrier, and live at Fochabers in the shire of 
Murray, and there I saw prisoner with a party of the rebels, and he was 
called and reputed Colonel of a regiment of Farquharsons in the rebel 
army, and was armed and dressed as aforesaid. 

Capt. EYRE ; Lieut. MOORE. He told these gentlemen he was 
Colonel of a regiment of the Farquharsons. 

EDWARD GIBSON. I saw the prisoner with the rebel army at 
Auchinbowy House, near Stirling, and he was esteemed Colonel of the 
rebels, and was armed and dressed as aforesaid. 



480 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JOHN REACH. I was servant to the prisoner, and he joined the 
rebels at Edinburgh with 30 men, and from thence went back to raise 
more. He was armed with sword and pistols, and wore a white cockade. 

[In formation laid at Inverness. Witlidrew his plea and pleaded guilty. 

Reprieved^ 



JAMES STEWART. 

JAMES PATERSON, No. 23. I have known the prisoner some years, 
and the first time I ever saw him along with the rebels was at Edinburgh, 
whilst that place was in their possession. After the battle of Prestonpans 
he was dressed in highland habit, and wore a broadsword and pistols. 
The next time I saw the prisoner was at the Links of Leith, where he 
commanded a party of the Duke of Perth's men for the execution of a 
man, who was shot on said Links for counterfeiting the Pretender's son's 
hand in granting protections, and robbing the country. That day the 
prisoner was in highland habit, on horseback. Saw him frequently after- 
wards at Edinburgh in highland dress, and the first night that the rebel 
army took possession of Carlisle, I saw prisoner within the castle gate 
talking with the rebel officer. I saw him frequently in England, marching 
at the head of a company in the Duke of Perth's regiment. Upon the 
retreat of the rebel army out of England, the prisoner marched along 
with them on foot. During the siege of the castle of Stirling, I saw him 
walking in the town along with the rebel officers. Saw him often in 
Inverness while it was in possession of the rebels, and upon the field of 
Culloden before the battle. 

ANDREW ROBINSON, No. 16. I saw defendant at Fochabers, before 
the battle of Culloden, along with the rebels in that town. The Duke of 
Perth's regiment, to which he belonged, lay at Speyside, and defendant 
at that time wore a white cockade in his bonnet. 

Lieut. MOORE, Battereau's regiment. I was one of five officers 
appointed by the Duke of Cumberland to take notice of the rebel 
prisoners, and the prisoner told me he was Major in the Duke of Perth's 
regiment. Upon the pursuit of the rebels after the battle of Culloden, 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 481 

I saw prisoner taken by a party of the Duke of Kingston's horse, and 
remember that prisoner in that pursuit had his horse shot under him. 

ROGER MACDONALD. I have known the prisoner above seven years. 
That the first time I saw the prisoner with the rebels was the day after 
the battle of Prestonpans at Edinburgh, when it was in possession of the 
rebels, attending his master the Duke of Perth as usual. I saw him 
several times after that in highland clothes, armed with broadsword and 
pistols. He marched with the Duke of Perth's regiment, of which he 
was Major, to Derby sometimes on horseback and sometimes on foot 
always armed. I particularly saw him at Ashburn pass in review, before 
the Pretender's son, in the Duke of Perth's regiment. Saw him upon 
guard, of which he was captain, at Stirling, after the battle of Falkirk. 
He had to guard the prisoners taken by the rebels at Falkirk. In the 
march from Stirling towards Inverness I saw the prisoner at Elgin in 
Murray, before the Duke of Cumberland had passed the Spey. The 
prisoner went into the town of Elgin to bespeak quarters for the Duke of 
Perth's regiment, which came thither presently after that. 

ALLAN STEWART, No. 24. I know the prisoner very well. The 
first time I saw him was at Crieff, a long time before the rebels first went 
to Edinburgh. At that time there was only Ardshiel's regiment at Crieff, 
and the prisoner then was only servant to the Duke of Perth. After the 
Duke of Perth had raised his men the prisoner was called Major in his 
regiment. I saw the prisoner several times at Edinburgh with the rebels 
before the battle of Prestonpans, dressed in short coat and plush breeches, 
and wearing a bonnet. That the evening before the battle of Prestonpans, 
when the rebel army was drawn up upon a hill, I and the prisoner, James 
Stewart, and some others, went down to a coal pit to take a view of the 
King's troops. At that time, somebody observing the prisoner's side 
breeches pockets to be very bulky, took out a pistol from the prisoner's 
pocket. He thereupon produced out of his other pockets two small 
pistols, and two others of a larger size with double barrels. Prisoner at 
same time had a blunderbuss across his arm. I frequently saw him 
marching along with the rebels in England, and when the King's troops 
were advancing to the Spey prisoner marched at the head of the Duke of 
Perth's regiment through Elgin. 

M 2 



482 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

JOHN HAY, No. 50. I often saw prisoner at Inverness as Major in 
Duke of Perth's regiment before the battle of Culloden. 

Capt. CAMPBELL, No. 52. Whilst Edinburgh was in possession of 
the rebels I often saw prisoner about Holyrood House, armed and in 
the highland dress. He appeared to be a very active man among the 
rebels. Saw him at Duddingston along with the Duke of Perth's 
regiment. 

WALTER SCOTT, No. 5 1 ; ALEX. RUSSEL. Testify as above, and say 
that in October, 1745, prisoner commanded a party of the rebels who 
were then going to Leith Links to shoot a man for giving protection and 
taking money therefor. Heard the prisoner give orders for so many of 
the red coats, as he called the King's soldiers, who had the misfortune to 
be taken at Prestonpans, to shoot the man before mentioned. 

JAMES Ross, No. 55 ; THOMAS ARMSTRONG; HUGH Ross; JAMES 
PARKER ; DONALD FERGUSON ; DUNCAN MACDONALD. These wit- 
nesses all declare that he was an officer in the Duke of Perth's regiment. 
That he was with the rebels in England, and also at Stirling, Falkirk, 
Elgin, Fochabers, and Inverness, dressed as aforesaid. 

Capt. EYRE. Prisoner told this gentleman that he was Major in the 
Duke of Perth's regiment. 

WILLIAM CLARK ; ANDREW JOHNSTON ; JOHN FALKNER ; HENRY 
CHEAP ; FRANCIS CHALMERS ; Mr. CHAS. LESLIE ; WM. WILSON ; 
PATRICK DOUGLAS ; JOHN REACH ; THOS. GORDON. These all testify 
as to the prisoner's presence with the rebels, as an officer in the Duke of 
Perth's regiment, and that he had been seen by some of them, armed and 
dressed as aforesaid, at Edinburgh, Duddingston, Penrith, Dalkeith, 
Glasgow, Clifton, Kendal, Lancaster, Derby, Carlisle, and Peebles, Perth, 
Stirling, Falkirk, Inverness, and Culloden. 



JAMES HAY. 

I, Louis Drummond, Earl of Melford, Colonel of Foot in his most 
Christian Majesty's service, Lieut. -Col. and Commandant of his Royal 
Scotch Regiment, prisoner of war to his Britannick Majesty at Penrith, 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 483 

being principal officer of the aforesaid regiment, as well as of the French 
troops, prisoners of war, do by these presents declare and signify to 
Phillip Carteret Webb, Esq., his Britannick Majesty's Sollicitor for the 
Assizes, now held at Carlisle, in the county of Cumberland, the following 
particulars : 

1. That Mr. James Hay, whom you prosecute for high treason, is a 
Captain in the French service in the aforenamed regiment, that he served 
before the Cartel of Frankfort, of which I shall speak : that lie came into 
Great Britain with his colours, which he continually adhered to ; that he 
surrendered himself prisoner of war, and not a State prisoner, upon the 
public faith of a capitulation, granted to the French troops at Inverness 
by His Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland. In fine, that he has 
been nominally reclaimed from his Britannick Majesty by two letters 
wrote to his Grace the Duke of Newcastle, Principal Secretary of State. 

2. I declare and certify that the said James Hay, thus acknowledged 
and reclaimed, in an authentic manner, is no shape, subject or lyable to 
the laws of Great Britain for rebellion ; and that in consequence of the 
two first articles of the Cartel hereunto annexed, signed by the Com- 
missaries of both Kings at Frankfort, July loth, 1743. It is there 
specified in proper terms that the prisoners taken on both sides, what 
kingdom soever they should be natives of, and in what place soever they 
should be taken, should be mutually exchanged without reservation or 
distinction. It's therefore evident that no objection can be made to 
Mr. Hay about the place of his nativity, or that wherein he was taken. 
It's apparent that the two articles which I have cited have been inserted 
in the Cartel with no other view than to prevent the inconveniences 
which attend Mr. Hay's present situation, a case which is not uncommon 
and could not fail to have happened in the course of a long war between 
both Crowns ; as there be many subjects of his Britannick Majesty 
in some of our foreign regiments, as well as numbers of French subjects 
in the English and allied army. I may first instance General Legonier, 
who actually commands the English troops in Flanders, without 
mentioning such as had been taken at Fontenoy, and were exchanged 
without making any distinction. It can't be reasonably said that Mr. 
Hay's being taken in England or Great Britain excludes him from the 
benefit of the Cartel, which he would be otherwise entitled to, this is 
surely misstating both reason and justice, as it's expressly said in the 



484 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

Cartel that the exchange of prisoners shall take place in all countries 
and be confined to no particular kingdom, and nobody can doubt but 
that a war between contending powers must at length terminate in either 
of their dominions. Thus the intention of both courts in forming the 
articles of the Cartel is plain and obvious, the reasons that induced them 
thereto are evident, the words are too clear to be wrested into a different 
interpretation, and the truth of the whole is confirmed by the French 
courts having strictly confirmed thereto. It can't be presumed that this 
Cartel was framed by the Generals without a sufficient authority from 
their masters, whereas all military conventions such as cartels, capitulations, 
contributions, &c., are deemed to flow from the will and authority of the 
Sovereign, without which it would be impossible to wage war. Besides, 
suppose the Cartel had been made only by the authority of the Generals, 
was it not afterwards ratified and confirmed by both crowns, who have 
openly and in the eyes of the world claimed and obtained its benefit, 
which no man in England can be a stranger to. Insomuch, that it ought 
to be regarded not only as a true treaty, but as the most public and 
authentic act of the law of nations. 

It can be objected with as little reason that though it had been 
regarded as a true treaty, founded on the law of nations, yet it can't be 
valid before our tribunal, as it clashed with the laws of the realm. There 
is nobody, I presume, will pretend to say that the particular laws of 
countries will prevail before the law of nations, which makes them void in 
all the tribunals in the world. When a treaty is entered into, or an 
alliance made, with a foreign Prince, by an act founded on the law of 
nations, from that moment all the laws of a particular country opposite 
thereto become null. If this had not been the case, what possibility 
of reconciling articles where the laws and certain pretensions are 
diametrically opposite. Would not both nations in a little time be looked 
upon as barbarians and cannibals rather than as English and Frenchmen, 
and what would be said of the glory and generosity of either nation. 

It may be objected that no act whatsoever, whether founded on the 
law of nations, or on the law of any particular country, can be valid but 
inasmuch as it's consistent with the formalities used in the establishment 
of the laws of this kingdom. But 'tis plain that that can be of weight but 
against such as knowingly and willingly have neglected those formalities, 
and not against those who neither could nor were charged to see them 



DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 485 

executed. For can one reasonably suppose that an act which was so 
punctually observed and complied with last year in France with regard to 
the English, should be this year deemed invalid in England with regard 
to the French officers, under a frivolous pretext that some customs or 
forms of law had not been attended to, or were neglected unknown to the 
French. 

I can further add a multiplicity of reasons to show that such acts 
have been executed time out of mind in England and never before 
enfringed, being deemed good in law. As for instance, a Cartel about 
the exchange of prisoners between Louis XIV. and William the Third 
relating to the Irish Brigade in the French service ; as also the famous 
capitulation of Limerick by which William the Third treated with the 
Irish who were in arms against him, though looked upon as his subjects : 
were not then these two acts deemed sufficient to annul the penal laws 
that were incurred, and why should not the Cartel of Frankfort have the 
same validity at this juncture. 

In consideration of these reasons, having hereunto annexed a copy of 
the Cartel of Frankfort, which I own to be true, and which is too 
notorious by its execution till this day to be doubted of either by you, 
Mr. Solicitor General, or by the judges ; having also added the English 
translation of the articles in question which you will please to verify or 
get verified, I humbly pray and expressly require of you to cause all 
prosecution to cease on your part, as well as on that of the judges, now 
and hereafter against the said French officer, James Hay, in regard of the 
crime of high treason alleadged against him, inasmuch as the law can take 
no hold on him, nor can the judges submit him thereto without your 
being wanting in the respect due to his Britannick Majesty, who screens 
him from all law and prosecution in this affair by the injunction, 
confirmation, and execution of the aforesaid Cartel by his Britannick 
Majesty. 

I most humbly pray of you and expressly require of you to 
communicate this present writing to the judges, and to require of them, 
as it is the duty of their office, to have a due deference to the contents of 
the Cartel which I have presented to you, attested upon oath to be true ; 
and consequently to discharge from Court and set at liberty the said 
James Hay, it not being justifiable by the Cartel either for them or you 
to proceed against him, and in case that they nor you should think 



486 DEPOSITIONS AT JACOBITE TRIALS. 

proper to agree to my present request and summons, I first declare, after 
having rendered his Britannick Majesty the profound respect due to a 
sovereign and the justice due to his wisdom, that I believe him not 
thoroughly informed, or that he may be ignorant of the merit of the said 
James Hay's cause, and that he is prosecuted contrary to his knowledge : 
I next protest in the name of his Most Christian Majesty, my master, 
against all your proceedings carried on or to be carried on against him as 
null and void of all validity, contrary to the respect due to his 
Britannick Majesty whose conventions with strangers are here directly 
violated, being contrary to the law of nations, which, by virtue of the 
Cartel, screens the said James Hay from the influence of the laws in the 
present case. In short, as derogatory to the glory and right of his Most 
Christian Majesty, my master, to whom it belongs to protect and 
exchange the said James Hay. Even by the consent of his Britannick 
Majesty by virtue of an act notoriously acknowledged and fulfilled to 
to this very day by the two crowned heads, I declare to you, Mr. Solicitor 
General, and the judges, and all others, that this present paper contains 
my juridicial and public representations, requisitions, and protestations, 
and require that a due regard may be had to the same ; being 
authorised hereto by the law of nations, as the interest of his said Most 
Christian Majesty, my master, is concerned therein, and my duty in 
quality of principal officer of the French Troops, prisoners of war to his 
Britannick Majesty, oblige me thereto. Given and signed at Penrith, 
this 22nd of September, 1746, in the presence of 

L. DRUMMOND DE MELFOKD. 
JOHN MACDONALD. 
L. CHR. GEORGHEGAN. 
D'HORTORE DOUGLAS. 

Note. By my Lord Chief Baron Parker's letter to me, it appears that 
this matter never came under the consideration of the judges. The 
prisoner never proving a commission from the French King, or offering 
any evidence of the Cartel, so he was convicted. 



XXXI. 

MEMORIALS FOR THOMAS FORBESS OF ECHT, AND 
ANDREW HAY, YOUNGER OF RANNES. 

A. 

The Memorialist and his Ancestors, have possesst a considerable 
Estate in the County of Aberdeen for some Centurys, and as they very 
early distinguished themselves by their zeal for the Protestant Religion 
and Revolution Interest the Family sustained many losses and underwent 
many Hardships in the several disturbances that happened in the Country. 

In the years 1715 and 1716 when there was an Attempt made to 
overturn the present Happy Establishment, the Memorialist was very 
Active in the Support of his Majesty's Government, and by the Expense 
he was put to at that Time, and the losses he Sustained by the Rebels he 
contracted Debts to a great extent, which Joyned to a considerable loss 
he sustained in the South Seas obliged him sometime thereafter to sell 
his Estate for the payment of his Creditors. 

In yr 1715 about Chrismass the Memorialist was sent from Inverness 
to Aberdeen by Collodden and his Bror. the Lord President in order to 
raise money upon their Credit for the Service of the Government and in 
his way thither he was taken Prisoner by the Rebels and detained for 
about a month. 

In November 1745 when the Rebels were in possession of Aberdeen 
and the greatest part of the North Country, the Memorialist thinking it 
for his Majesty's Service, went to Inverness and informed the Earl of 
Loudon and the Lord President of the State of the Country and on his 
return with despatches from them was taken Prisoner by a Rebel Party 
where he was detained for some time. 



488 MEMORIAL FOR THOMAS FORBES. 

Upon the 2ist December the Memorialist Joyned the Laird of Mclcod 
at Inverury, and was afterwards again made Prisoner by the Rebels in 
the Skirmish which happened at that place upon the 23rd of that moneth, 
and was carry 'd about with them for many weeks till he found means to 
make his escape from them in the heights of Badenoch at the hazard of 
his life, after being rob'd of his cloath bag, money, watch, and everything 
he had about him. 

The Memorialist after he was taken Prisoner at Inverury, was carry'd 
from thence to Stirling where he lay in Jayl till the rebels made a retreat, 
and then he was carry'd with them to Badenoch ; as the weather was 
extremely bad and the Memorialist was obliged to walk on foot for the 
greatest part of the way, and at Night was obliged to ly in cold Prisons 
Churches Barns &c., he suffered very much in his health, and when he 
made his Escape was obliged to wander all night in ye hills. The 
Memorialist remained Prisoner from 23rd December till pth february, 
and at this time the Memorialist was a man upwards of 60 years of age. 

The many hardships which the Memorialist suffered, having Reduced 
him to very Straitining circumstances, application was made some years 
ago for a gift of certain Chaplane Dutys payable out of the Dioceses of 
Ross Caithness and Murray, which his Majesty was graciously pleased 
to grant to the Memorialist in the year 1736. But that Gift has hitherto 
proved ineffectual many of those Dutys having been long neglected to 
be levyd by the Crown or their Donator, so that it is now difficult to 
discover the Persons lyable in payment thereof; by which means the 
Produce of the Gift is Extremely Small, and has not hitherto rcpayd the 
Memorialist of the Expenses of obtaining and prosecuting it. 

The Memorialist formerly made Application to the Ministry for 
Scotland to get something done for him, and the Persons then in Power 
\vcre so good as to promise to procure him an appointment of 100 per 
Annum to be payd out of some Sure Fund, but that has never yet been 
obtained, so that the Memorialist is at present reduced to most pressing 
Necessitys and has nothing now to rely on, for the subsistance of himself 
and Family But the hopes that his Majesty shall be Graciously pleased 
to grant him Some Appointment for his Support. 



MEMORIAL FOR ANDREW HAY. 489 



B. 

UNTO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. The Humble 
petition of Andrew Hay younger of Rannes 

Sheweth, 

That your petitioner being a young man was unhappily 
induced in the latter end of October 1745 to join in the late Rebellion 
and is informed that on this Account he is excepted from your Majesties 
gracious Act of Indemnity. 

That your petitioner begs Leave with great Humilty to represent that 
he had not the least Accession to any Hardship done to any of your 
Majesty's faithful Subjects, but on the Contrary used his Utmost 
Endeavours to prevent anything of that kind when it was in his power 
as many of them can, and the Petitioner is persuaded will testify when 
called upon. 

That your Petitioner has since the month of Aprile 1746 lived in 
such a manner as not to give the least offence being determined to throw 
himself on your Majesties Clemency, that as a young man he might be 
at Liberty to follow his lawfull Business in his own Country rather as 
rccurr to and become Dependent upon any Forreign Power. 

That your Petitioner does not presume to mention these Circumstances 
as an Aleviation of his Guilt, but in order to move your Majesties' Com- 
passion and being most heartly sorry for his Offence he most humbly 
Submitts himself to your Majesty's Royal Clemency, and imploring your 
Royal Mercy promises to live a grateful and Dutifull Subject. 

And your Petitioner shall always pray, &c. 

S d . ANDREW HAY. 



N 2 



XXXII. 

CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 
$th June, 1747. 

Fort Augustus 8th August 1747. 

Lieut. Collonel Watson's Report to Major Gen 1 . Blakeney, of Capt. 
McPherson's Addit 1 . Company stationed at Tarland. 

After leaving Fort Augustus in order to Visit the Add 1 . Company of 
Lord John Murray's Reg 1 , you thought proper to order to Tarland, on 
purpose to cover the Shires of Banff, Aberdeen, Mearns and Angus, from 
the Depredations of the Thieves of Rannoch, Lochaber and Glengary, 
I crossed the River Spey nigh Avimore and reconnoitered the several 
passes, thro' the Mountains leading from the above shires, to the Countries 
where the Thieves resort, and by the Remarkable Service already per- 
formed by that Company I am persuaded it will be no difficult matter to 
bridle those Thieves so as to prevent their carrying any plunder from the 
above Shires. 

The Company was stationed according to the Route sent them of the 
1 8th of June last. 

Head Quarters at Tarland under the Command of Lieut. Forbes, 
who has detached as follows : 

A Corp 1 , and eight Men at Inchrory betwixt the head of the River 
Don and the River Avin. 

A Corp 1 , and eight Men to Ribbalachlagan on the head of the River 
Garin, which two last Posts cover the Shires of Banff and Aberdeen. 

A Serjeant and 12 Men at Dubrach on the head of the River Dee, the 
principal pass through which the Thieves carry the Plunder of the above 
Countries 



CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 49! 

A Serj'. and 8 Men to Glenclunie. 

Four Men to Spittle of Glenmuick. 

A Serjt. and 8 Men at Clova. 

Which three posts cover the Shires of Angus and Mearns, and the 
Dubrach is centrical to the whole. 

Lieut. Forbes acquainted me whilst the Posts were forming they 
recovered 43 head of Cattle from the Thieves of Rannoch, who were 
driveing them from those Countries, and that nothing had been lost 
since their Arrival. 

The Severall Posts are supplied with necessaries from the People of 
the Country except that of Inchrory, which one Grant, Factor in that 
place for the Duke of Gordon, told Lieut. Forbes was owing to the 
Country People refuseing to furnish their proportion, which was found 
upon enquiry to be false, for one of them told Lieut. Forbes it had never 
been demanded, and that they were willing and ready to do everything 
in their power for the Accomodation of the Party, But they believed so 
much Service done the Country was a thing not very agreeable to that 
Gentleman. This behaviour of the Factor I represented to the Duke of 
Gordon, who assured me he would make a proper use of it, and told me 
how thankfull the Country was for the protection you had given them. 

Some days after the Arrival of the Company at Tarland, One who 
had a property in those parts came to Lieut. Forbes, and after some 
conversation about the service they came upon, said, To what purpose 
trouble you yourself about four shires, Bamff and Aberdeen will be 
enough, Live and let Live and suffer the other two to take care of 
themselves. 

I have taken the liberty to mention those two trifleing circumstances 
to show the little pains taken by those, whose duty it is to discourage 
such bad practices. 

Advertisement published at Tarland by the Consent of the Gentlemen 

of the Country. 

Whereas Capt. Macpherson's Add 1 . Compy. of Lord John Murray's 
Reg'., has detatched from their Head Quarters at Tarland several parties 
to proper parts in the head of the Country, in order to prevent Depreda- 
tions as much as possible. 



492 CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 

This is therefore to give Notice to all concerned that whenever any 
Cattle are stolen, the Owners are immediately to acquaint that party of 
Soldiers that lye next them, and then to return and raise some of their 
Neighbours with all haste possible to take up the Track and follow till 
they meet the Soldiers, who have proper Orders to assist them, and that 
the Country People may know where to make their Application, the 
Different Stations occupied by the Company are as follows: 
Head Quarters at Tarland. 

A Party at .... Inchrory. 

A Party at .... Ribbalachlaggan. 

A Party at .... Dubrach. 

A Party at .... Glenclunie. 

A Party at .... Spittle of Glenmuick. 

A Party at .... Clova. 

That notwithstanding the above disposition of this Company, the 
Country People are not to rest too secure, but to see their Cattle once in 
the 24 Hours, and in that space of time at farthest to acquaint the 
Soldiers after Cattle are amissing, otherwise they can have little chance 
of recovering them. That they must at the same time be very cautious 
of giveing false Alarms to fatigue the Troops unnecessarily. 

And whereas several loose Men are just now travelling thro' the 
Hills in Arms, it is hereby particularly recommended to all Gentlemen 
and others in the heads of the Counties of Bamff, Aberdeen, Mearns and 
Angus, that they would give strict orders to all their Tennants and Herds 
in Glens to give early intelligence to the Serg 1 . or Corp 1 , nearest them, of 
such loose Men, or any Stoln Cattle, and for their encouragement they 
are to receive half a Guinea reward for every Thief that shall be catched, 
and one shilling for every head of Cattle that shall be recovered in 
consequence of such information, and they are hereby assured their 
Names shall never be discovered, the Serjeants and Corporals haveing 
got the Strictest Orders to that purpose, and the reward will be punctually 
paid by the Officer commanding at Tarland, or by Invercauld, Abergeldie, 
or any other of the Gentlemen nearest, who will take their chance of 
recovering it from the Neighbourhood. 

And on the other hand if any of the Country People or Herds in 
Glens, are discovered to have entertained, corresponded with, or harboured 
any such Men, or see Cattle and don't forthwith acquaint the Nearest 









CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 493 

Command, such persons will themselves be taken up, imprisoned and 
prosecute according to Law, as harbourers, Aiders, and Abbetors of 
Thieves and disorderly Men. 

A Copy of this to remain in the Session Clerk's hands of every 
Parish, that the Country People may have access when they please to 
know the Contents. 

Tarland, 4th July, 1747. 

Proposals offered to Major Gen 1 . Blakeney for Covering that part of 
Inverness Shire lying South side of Murray firth, and the Shires 
of Murray, Bamff, Aberdeen, M earns and Angus against tlie Depre- 
dations of the Highlanders of Rannoch, Lochaber, and Glengary. 

The Continual Depredations Committed upon those Shires, from the 
above mentioned parts of the Highlands, seems to be a Scheme Artfully 
contrived, to Nurse and encourage the barbarity and idleness of these 
people, and may be called the principal spring of Rebellion, and all the 
irregularities they are so remarkable for, who being protected and 
encouraged in their theft, being themselves under the power of their 
Chiefs, who can and will give them up to Justice, should they at any 
time refuse, to give all sort of obedience to their unlawfull commands, 
and this practice of Thieving is the sure and known Means of training 
up a number of people to the use of Arms, who on the least prospect of 
plunder are ready to join in any Rebellion or Tumult. 

In order to correct this abuse it will be difficult Matter to bridle those 
parts of the Highlands, where the Thieves reside, and at the same time 
by a proper chain of Posts effectually secure the heads of those Shires 
opposed to their depredations. 

In order to cover part of the Shire of Inverness and the Shire of 
Murray, it would be proper to Station a Company at Ruthven, and to 
Detatch as follows : 

To Braes of Strathnairn i Corp 1 . 6 Men. 

Braes of Strathearn i Corp 1 . 6 Men. 

Inverlaidnan i Corp 1 . 4 Men. 

Glenbanchor 5 Men. 

Garvimore . . . . i Serg. . . 8 Men. 

Glenfechy 

Dalwhinnie . . i Sub. i Serg'. . . 8 Men. 



494 CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 

For the further Security of those Countries Tis proposed to continue 
the chain by Stationing a Company at Taybridge, and to Detatch as 
follows : 



To Dalnacardoch ... . i Sub. 
Half-way 'twixt Blair and Do. 

Glenlyon 

Teindrum in Broadalbine 
Braes of Glenalmond 



Serg 1 . 9 Men. 

Corp 1 . 3 Men. 

Corp 1 . 6 Men. 

Serg'. 8 Men. 

Corp 1 . 6 Men. 



Which two Company's form the first Chain from the Braes of Strathnairn 
to the Braes of Glenalmond. 

The heads of the Shires of Bamff, Aberdeen, Mearns and Angus, 
nearly join about the Sources of the Rivers Don and Dee, and are 
bounded on the North by the River Spey, and on the South by a Ridge 
of Mountains, which bending round the heads of those Countries, run 
northward and end at the head of Loch Inch about two Miles below 
Ruthven. If the heads of those Countries and the passes thro 1 the 
Mountains were guarded, it would be scarce practicable to carry any 
Cattle from these Shires, for which Service 'tis proposed to Station one 
Compy. in Cargarff Castle near the head of the River Don, it belongs to 
Lord Bracco, is at present uninhabited, and would with a small charge be 
made a most convenient Barrack for a Company to Detatch as follows: 
To Inchrory i Corp 1 . 6 Men. 

Ribbalachlagan 5 Men. 

Glenclunie 4 Men. 

Glenmuick 4 Men. 

Glenclova I Corp 1 . 4 Men. 

Dubrach . . . i Serg 1 . I Corp 1 . 12 Men. 

Tarland i Serg 1 . . .10 Men. 

By this Disposition the Thieves must cross two different Chains 
before they can carry their plunder into their own Country. The 
Company quartered at Cargarff and the two Companys posted at 
Ruthven and Taybridge, who can't miss being alarmed by the Country 
People, should they chance to pass the first chain formed by the Company 
at Cargarff. 

One of Lord Loudon's Add 1 . Companys being compleated will be 
sufficient to guard Ross Shire. Tis proposed to Quarter a Company in 
Rannoch and Lochaber. 



CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 495 

The Commanding Officers of these Cornpy 8 . to send once every week 
patrolles from the Sev 1 . Posts most Contiguous to one another, who shall 
meet at such places of Rendezvous as they may think proper to appoint, 
Always observing to change the Day as well as the places of Rendezvous, 
that neither the Country People or their own Men may know their Route 
or the Day. / 

These precautions must greatly prevent Depredations from the 
Highlands, if the people give but timely Notice to the Posts when their 
Cattle are amissing. 

If this Disposition is approved of for Cantoning the four above 
mentioned Companys during the season of driving Cattle in the High- 
lands, which is from the beginning of June (when the Cattle are able to 
travel) to the end of Christmass. 

The Out Posts can have proper Cover erected for them at their several 
Stations, and be Supplied with all Manner of necessaries from the above 
Countys without putting the Governm 1 . to any charge. 

The Thieves from Rannoch, Lochaber, and Glengary in driveing 
Cattle from the Counties of Angus, Mearns, Aberdeen and Bamff, usually 
take the following Routes. Those who Rob from the two first Counties 
drive their Plunder through the Glens of Clova, all along the Mountains 
South side of the River Dee, and must pass near Glenclunie or Glenshcc, 
so as to fall into the Hills of Athole or the Forrest of Guiley, and in 
either of these Routes must afterwards cross the Chain betwixt Dal- 
whinnic and Dalnacardoch, unless alarmed and driven Northward 
towards Ruthven. 

The Thieves in conveying their Plunder from Bamff and Aberdeen- 
shires, if from the Country twixt Dee and Don, they must go through 
the Forrest and Mountains of Morvaine, then by Loch Bulg, and from 
thence to the Forrest of Guiley or Mountains of Marr, and so fall into 
the former Route. 

Betwixt Don and Spey they must pass through the Mountains of 
Glenoughty and Glenavin, and afterwards fall into the Mountains of 
Abernethy, or further South take the Route formerly mentioned, but at 
any rate all the plunder from the four Shires, must pass betwixt Ruthven 
of Badenoch and Blair. 



CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 



Proposals from Lieutenant General Blakeney, Commanding His Majesty 's 
forces in North Britain, to the Gentlemen of the County of Aberdeen, 
Copies of which they'l please cause be transmitted to the Gentlemen 
of the Counties of Angus, M earns, Bamff and Murray. 

Whereas the above Counties have formerly been at great Charges to 
prevent and hinder Devastations from the Highlands all which attempts 
have by experience hitherto proved ineffectual, and the Danger of late 
becoming greater than formerly, the Gentlemen of the County having 
made application to me for the Assistance of the Troops, I according to 
their Request Stationed a Company of Foot at Tarland, purposely to 
make trial how far it would answer the end proposed, And now find from 
Experience the Country can be effectually protected, by posting detatch- 
ments of the Regular Troops in proper places ; a service carefully 
attended to and duely asserted and encouraged by the Gentlemen of the 
Country, must be of the greatest benefit to those Counties and the 
Nation in general. 

As the Troops to be employed for that purpose must be divided into 
Several small Parties and Stationed in such parts of the Country where 
they can't be accomodated with Quarters or Common Necessaries, which 
inconvenicncies can't be remedyed but by the assistance of the Country, 
and obliges me to make the following proposals to the Gentlemen, Viz'., 
200 Men for the Protection of the above Counties, to be proportioned as 

follows : 

Men. 
Aberdeenshire ...... 60 

Bamff and Murray ..... 60 

Angus and Mcarns ..... 80 

200 

Necessary Accomodations for the Sixty Men,, in Aberdeenshire, are 
as follows : 

30 Bedsteads at 55. each . . . . 7 10 o 
60 pair of Blankets at 6s. each pair . . 18 o o 
Pot and Pan to each Mess of 6 Men at 6s. each 300 
Salt for the Whole for one Season . .100 






CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 497 

2 Wooden Bowls to each Mess at 8d. each .013 4 
2 Dishes of Do. at 6d. each . . . .0100 
6 Plates of Do. at 3d. each . . . .0150 
10 Water Buckets at is. each . . . o 10 o 
10 pair of Tongs at is. each . . . .0100 
10 Iron Shovels at i8d. each . . . .0150 
10 Coal Boxes or Backets for carrying out the 

Ashes at 1/6 each o 15 o 

Supposed they get 10 Tables and 20 Forms 

from the Fort at Aberdeen o o o 



33 18 4 

The whole expence its proposed be paid by the County of Aberdeen 
for accomodating the above Sixty Men, and the Sum for purchasing the 
Particulars mentioned to be paid Lieut Forbes of Lord John Murray's 
Reg'., so that they may be provided against the first of May next upon 
his Receipt for which he'l be accountable to the Officer who may relieve 
him in order to indemnify the County of any further expence, except 
what's necessary for keeping them in repair which can't exceed 5 yearly. 

Recommended to the other Counties they would provide the same 
necessaries in proportion to the Men alloted them. 

'Tis recommended to the Gentlemen if they think proper, to give 
some premium or encouragement to the Soldiers proportioned to their 
Care and Diligence in performing their Duty, because the Service they 
are to be employed in is not only fatiguing but attended with extraordinary 
expence of Shoes, Stockings, &c. 

Proposed the Parties be supplied with Meal Malt and Provisions at 
the Ordinary prices of the Country and Such Posts as may be stationed 
at a distance from any Village, may have their Meal and Malt carried to 
them, as they can have no conveniency of doing it themselves. All Posts 
to be furnished with fireing. 

It is also recommended the Gentlemen near those Posts where there 
may be no Cover already made, May furnish Wood, and Assist in makeing 
small Shieldings or Hutts for covering the Parties. 

For the Satisfaction of the Country People, and that they may know 
where to apply for assistance, Copies to be printed of the Annexed 

O 2 



498 CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 

Advertisement and published at all the Parish Kirks of the Above 
Counties, and fixed upon the Church Doors. 

I should be glad to know if the Gentlemen agree to the above 
proposals, and that they would acquaint me as soon as they can con- 
veniently, being determined to give all possible assistance and encourage- 
ment for preserving the Quiet and property of the Country, and guarding 
them against such oppressive Depredations. 

All which I hope to have the Honour of Reporting and laying before 
his Majesty. 



Copy of Lieut. Gen 1 . Blakeney's Orders sent by Col. Watson to Capt. 
Menzies of Lord John Murray's Add 1 . Company s. 

Sir, 

I am commanded by Gen 1 . Blakeney to acquaint you, that it's 
his Orders you send Patrolles from the several Posts of Glenlyon, 
Teindrum and Glenalmond, through the Adjacent Mountains and Passes, 
and to all such Places as you may have a probability of discovering 
Tracts, Stolen Cattle, or Vagabonds in Arms in the Mountains, and that 
each Station throughout the whole keep a Communication with the 
Stations nearest to it, without respect to the Companys they belong to, 
And as you have experience in this Service, the Gen 1 , desires you'l 
concert with the officer at Rannoch in regulateing the Patrolles from that 
Detatchment, and expects you'l leave no Step untaken, that can Con- 
tribute to the good of the Service, intended by the Several Posts for 
preventing Depredations, &c. The Detatchment of yours at Dalna- 
cardoch is to continue to Patrolle with those of Dalwhinnie and Dubrach 
as by the General's Orders from Inverness, and to keep a Communication 
as above at the same time, It's the General's Orders you acquaint the 
Officer commanding in Chief at Edinburgh of the Manner you propose 
sending those Patrolles so as to have the desired effect, and that you 
continue to transmitt a weekly report of all the Cattle Stolen in your 
District and from whom, or what Numbers you may hear have been 
drove by the Thieves from other Countries, through your part of the 
Chain, You are also to insert the Number retaken, and by what party, 
with all other extraordinaries, You'l communicate these Orders to Capt. 



CONCERNING HIGHLAND DEPREDATIONS. 4$C) 

Campbell, and to the Officer commanding at Rannoch, whose Detatch- 
ment lying more Contiguous to Taybridge than to Inverera is to report 
to you, which you'l insert and forward with your Own. 

Orders to this purpose are sent to the Officers Commanding at 
Ruthven, Tarland and Rossshire. 

I am, 

Sir, 

Your most humble Serv'. 

To Capt. Menzies D. W. 

of L d . John Murray's, 
Taybridge. 



XXXIII. 

MEMORIAL ANENT THE THIEVING AND DEPREDATIONS 

IN THE HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND, AND THE 

COUNTRIES BORDERING THEREON (1747?). 

It is very well known, not only to all the Scotch Members, in both 
Houses of Parliament, but to many Thousands of his Majesty's most 
loyal and dutyful Subjects (who daily feel the effects thereof), what 
miserable havock there is made by the barbarous thieving Highlanders, 
of but a few Countrys, upon all the rest of the more extensive and 
fertile parts thereof, and also in the whole Low Countries bordering 
thereon, by pillaging their Houses and Stealing and driving away their 
Horses and Black Cattle, without any the least Notice taken, or remedy 
applied by the Government for said grievance. The present great 
dissatisfaction, among such vast Numbers of People of all Ranks upon 
that Account (if allowed long to continue) would no doubt grow, into 
some disaffection to his Majesty's Person and Government. 

It is obvious that there is none of his Majesty's Forces fit to be 
employed for remedying this insufferable evil, but Highlanders, who 
having their own Dress and language are the only people properest for 
the fatigue, of long and Night Marches through such rough and Uncouth 
Places, and can by their Intelligence (having the Irish Tongue) get these 
Thieves best ferreted out of their lurking Holes. 

As there are at present no other Regular Forces in Scotland that are 
Highlanders, but the Five Recruiting Company's of Lord John Murray's 
and the Earl of Loudon's Reg ts ., who are now said to be Augmented to 
100 Men each, His Excellency Gen 1 . Blakeney, late Commander in Chief, 
of his great Wisdom and Prudence having maturely considered the 



MEMORIAL ANENT THIEVING. 5O1 

Urgent Necessity of giving some Curb to the present growing Wicked- 
ness, which he takes to be an insult upon the Government, and is,like to 
terminate in the Devestation of a great part of the Country, made Trial 
of making sev 1 . Detatchments this last Summer of small Partys out of 
the said Companies to the different dangerous Passes where Depredations 
used to be driven, which was found to be of great use, and his Excellency 
in consequence thereof has since laid down a Scheme how the whole 
Nation may be protected in the same Manner without putting the 
Government to any further Charges of New Levies, which is the occasion 
of the Subsequent part of this Memorial, as a Supplement in support of 
said laudable design and undertaking, and if followed furth in all appear- 
ance will make the same effectual to answer the so much desired end. 

The General's Scheme is in so far approved by every Person, but in 
the Memorialists humble opinion, the same being only defensive against 
those Villanous Disturbers of the Peace and no wise offensive, it will 
never turn out to make a Sufficient (but only a palliating) Cure. It is 
just the same as Skining over a flesh wound while rottenness is at the 
Bone, the same will daily break out afresh, until the Wound be searched 
to the Bottom, and the Virulent Distemper be eaten out by Corrosives ; 
As this is the State of an Human Body, it is the very same in the Body 
Politic ; When such ingrained Villany and Wickedness by long habit is 
once so deeply rooted in the Hearts (as well as inclinations) of so 
Numerous a Set of People, there is an absolute necessity of making an 
offensive as well as Defensive War against them. 

The few Villanous Countries that stand as Common Enemies to the 
rest of the Nation, and that commit those daily depredations (and who 
have been so time out of mind) are Roinach, Glenco, Lochaber, Glengary, 
Knoidart, Glenmoriston, and Glenavie and Laggan in Brae of Badenoch. 
It is humbly proposed by the Memorialist (there being a disarming Act 
already past) that the Wicked Possessors of these above named Countries 
be suddenly summoned and disarmed at first, before any of the rest of 
the Highlands ; were it but for a few Months, that they may once 
perceive themselves distinguished for their Villany, they being the only 
Wicked Aggressors, and People that occasion the keeping up the Spirit 
and general use of Arms in all the Highlands of Scotland. 

All the rest of the much more Numerous and honest Highland 
Countries with the other Low Countries bordering on them, are necessiate 



SO2 MEMORIAL ANKNT THIEVING 

to keep the use of some Arms (if they should sell their Cloaths to 
purchase them) in order to defend their Horses and Cattle from being 
plundered and driven away by the Possessors of the infamous Countries 
above mentioned. 

If once these Countries specified were totally disarmed, as above 
proposed, under the penalty of hanging or at least Transportation of the 
Transgressors, it is humbly proposed (still under Correction of those of 
better knowledge) that there be an order from the Government, to all the 
Sheriffs and Justices in Scotland, to call for and take in Lists of all the 
Villanous and infamous People, that live by stealing and Robbery, and 
that have no Employments, or other Visible way of Subsistence, not only 
in these Thieving Countries, but in any other Countries in the Neighbour- 
hood, and such Lists also to contain those who are Outhounders, Receipters, 
Retainers and Corresponders with these Villians, or receivers of Black 
Mail, and it ought to be recommended in the Advertisements sent by the 
Sheriffs, &c. That all his Majesty's good and faithful Subjects may be 
assistant in Collecting and making up said Lists. 

After said Lists are made up let them all be cited at the several head 
Burghs of each Shire where they commonly resort, to compear against 
such particular Days before the proper Judges appointed, in order to give 
sufficient Bail for their future behaviour, and those who do not compear 
to be declared Fugitives, and the List of those so Fugitate immediately 
to be transmitted to the Commander in Chief, and sent by him to the 
Commanders of the several Garrisons throughout that part of the 
Kingdom, and more particularly to the Officers of the Recruiting 
Companies dispersed through the Highlands, in order to seize and 
apprehend all such of those Fugitives as lye in their Power or fall in 
their Way. 

And further (if it consists with the Government's pleasure) that there 
be an order from the General, to the Captains or other Commanding 
Officers of the 5 Recruiting Companys of Lord John Murray's and Earl 
of Loudon's Reg ts ., to Detatch a Serjeant, Corporal, and Ten Men, out 
of each Company (picked and chosen the fittest for the purpose), which 
in all will make Sixty Men to be commanded by such Officers and 
Subalterns as the Gen 1 , shall think proper, to be a flying Party either 
some times in whole or in parcels, at the direction of the Commanding 
Officer to go in Search of those Fugitives through all the places they 
commonly haunt or resort to in order to Seize them. 



AND DEPREDATIONS IN HIGHLANDS. 503 

It is especially to be remarked that these Companies, being only 
appointed and left in Scotland for Recruiting their Several Regim 15 ., that 
it seems to be absolutely fit as an Earnest of their Reward, for such 
fatiguing Expeditions that there be full assurance given to these Sixty 
Men, not to be draughted for Recruits neither sent abroad unless the 
whole Companies one or more were going altogether, otherwise they 
could never be thought sufficient to be trusted in executing so Important 
a piece of Service, if this was not done their precarious State without it 
would much discourage any faithful and hearty Actings in said Search. 
It is humbly thought that the Companies will be in no Strait as to that 
particular since there will be Ninety remaining in each, out of which to 
draught their Recruits. 

This part of the proposal is the more Warmly pressed since it is from 
the Success, Activity and Diligence of said Flying Party, that the finishing 
Stroke must be given, to eradicate that Mortal Gangrene in the Common 
Wealth, and for their further encouragement that there be a Premium of 
$ Sterling Money given to the Soldiers for every Fugitive that is taken, 
either Dead or Alive (what is meant by Dead) is in the Case of their 
being Shot or killed upon their making resistance, and such Premiums to 
be levied at the Direction of the Law, by Military Execution upon the 
Countries where they haunted and was found entertained and harboured, 
and that these Premiums be distribute at the discretion of the Gen 1 . 
Commanding in Chief, who (after being rightly informed) will be best 
Judge of their different deservings. 

It is hoped that His Excellency General Blakeney's Scheme in sending 
out Parties to all the dangerous Passes to defend the Countries, together 
with the useing this offensive part Vigorously will effectually make an 
End, of the foresaid Villanous practice which will (by the consequence,) 
much redound to the benefit and happiness of the whole United Island. 

It is the Memorialists opinion that it is a good presage of Success in 
this Noble undertaking that the Executive part will fall in the hands of 
so honourable and Worthy a Person, of so Established a Character as 
his Excellency Gen 1 . Bland, who will (when instructed) perform the same 
with equal due respect to his Majesty and the Government their Honour 
and the Liberty and Property of his faithful Subjects. 



XXXIV. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE ROAD FROM AVIMORE TO 
ABERDEEN. July pth, 1747. 

M iles Avimore. 

6 Cullncayll. 

6 Foord of Carnagavall on the River Aivn. 

6 Milntown of Clargue in CorgarfiT. 

6 New nigh the Kirk of Strathdon. 

5 Tarland in Cromarr. 

3 Charletown of Aboyne. 

3 Kincardin O'Neil. 

5 Banchorie. 

12 Aberdeen. 

Total 52 

Culnacayll is a Village in the Country of Strathspey, South side the 
River, where the York Building Company had their Iron Works, The 
Road from thence to the Foord of Carnagavall, is through part of the 
Braes of Abernethy, and over a Hill called Crorskvie-lay, over which 
there might be a Road easily made, as the Hill is not steep. 

Foord of Carnagavall is upon the River Avin in the Braes of 
Strathavin or Strathdon, belonging to the Duke of Gordon. Here live 
several Thieves, who correspond with those of the West Highlands, and 
do a deal of Meschief by the assistance and Information they give them. 
In this Country are the Hills and Glens of Binnavin, which are very 
extensive and convenient for Sheltering or concealing Stoln Cattle and 
Horses. This Foord is one of the passes thro' which they often drive 
their Plunder, and lyes three Miles north from Inchrory. The Road from 



AVIMORE TO ABERDEEN. 505 

this place to Milntown of Clargue goes over a Hill called Leacht, which 
is not high, nor would it be difficult to carry the Road over it. 

Milntown of Clargue lies near the Castle of Corgarff in the Braes of 
Strathdon, from thence the Road goes through an Inland Country to 
New, where there is a Bridge over the River Don. 

New lyes a short Mile below the Kirk of Strathdon, on the North 
side of the River. The Road from thence to Tarland crosses several 
little Hills and a small River called Descry, where there is no Bridge. 

Tarland is a Country Village in the middle of a plentiful! Corn 
Country called Cromarr, belonging to the Earl of Aberdeen. The Road 
from this to Charletown is through a flatt Country. 

Charletown of Aboyne is also a good Country Village belonging to 
the Earl of Aboyne, on the North of the River Dee, here it joins the 
Road from Castletown to Aberdeen, and goes by Kincardine O' Neil and 
Banchorie along the North side of the River Dee to Aberdeen. 



P 2 



XXXV. 

DESCRIPTION OF THE HILLS, GLENS AND PASSES IN 
THE COUNTIES OF ABERDEEN, &c. July 9th, 1747. 

A Description of the Chain formed by Capt. MacPherson's Additional 
Company of Lord John Murray's Reg 1 , for the Protection of the Counties 
of Angus, Mearns, Aberdeen and Banff against Depredations from the 
Highlands. 

At Glen Tilt in Glen Shee the farthest South Post . . . H H 3 
At Glen-Clunie north of that . . . . . . . I n 7 

At Dubrach in the head of Braemarr which is the principal out 

Station and Centrical to y e whole I n 10 

At Ribbalachlagan on the head of the River Garin nigh Loch- 
builg, a Centrical Post betwixt the Heads of Dee and Don, 

North East of Dubrach .16 

At Inchrory 3 Miles North from Ribbalachlagan in the Braes 

of Strathavin I n 9 

Of these there are three Men detached to the Foord of Carnagavall 
three Miles Northward from Inchrory, which last Post lies farthest 
Northward. 

The Party near Glentilt in Glenshee patrolle to Glen Tamuck and 
the Hills betwixt Glenshee and Glenclunic, and meet the Glenclunie 
Post on Carnvalg. 

The Glenclunie Post patrolle to Glencallader, the Hills of Baddoch 
and Glen Ey, and meet with the Dubrach Post at Allanamhoir. 

The Dubrach Post Patrolle through Glenbeg, Glenmore, Cornriogh, 
Fallar, Corryvrion, the Forrest of Gaulaig (where they meet a party of 
Capt. Mackay's Company) and through Glenguishich, Glendee, Glenlug, 



HILLS AND GLENS IN ABERDEENSHIRE. 507 

and meet the Ribbalachlagan Party at Allanabium, they also patrolle the 
length of Glentilt to y e South. 

The Ribbalachlagan Post, through Fallny, Lochnagowr, Lochnashien, 
Essie, Binnavordy, and meet with the Inchrory Post at Lochnagowr. 

The Inchrory Party Patrolle through Elick, Caplich, Lagganamhearlich, 
Loch Avin, Glenbuilg, and Northward the length of the Foord of Carna- 
gavall. 

These are the Hills and passes through which the Soldiers have 
Patrolled twice or thrice a week, tho' not upon fixed days. 

There is hereto Subjoined a Note of the Hills and Passes through 
which the Thieves drive such Cattle as they Steal from any of the above 
mentioned Counties. 

When Cattle are Stoln from Angus or Mearns, or from any part of 
Aberdeenshire South of Dee, they generally come through the Hills 
betwixt, Glentanar, and Glenesk, Then through the Hills of Glenclova 
and Corryvooe and cross the Carnvalg betwixt Glenshee and Glenclunie, 
Next through the Baddoch, Glentatnick, Cornriogh, Glenbeg, Glenmore, 
and Glenfearnell (which are all betwixt Braemarr and Braes of Angus). 
Then crossing at Invergary they go through Binnbikrattich, But sometimes 
coming into the Baddoch they go through Glenmore, down by Fallar and 
cross at Dellchruinach and Pollturie, Or coming from the Baddoch betwixt 
Cornriogh and Altanamhoir, through the Dualtean and the Corryvroin, 
they go up Gaulaig and Boynag, then into the Hills of Badencch, and 
must pass somewhere betwixt Dalnacardoch and Ruthven. 

After they bring Cattle the length of the Braes of Clova, they some- 
times turn through Glen Callader and Ballochbuee, and crossing Dee 
below Invercauld, pass through the Hills betwixt Invercauld and the 
Water of Gairden, then through Glenluy and Glenguissich, and at 
Stromwoldick, and then into the Hills of Badenoch, where they must 
after follow the Route above mentioned. 

Sometimes when they drive Cattle from the Forrest of Birse and 
Glentanar to the South of Dee, they cross Dee at Tullich, Six miles 
above Aboyne, and then take the Route mentioned in the following 
Paragraph. 

When Cattle are Stolen from any part of Aberdeenshire betwixt Dee 
and Don, they generally drive them through the Hills and Forrest of 
Morvine, and pass at Altnashein or Loch Builg near Ribbalachlagan, 



508 HILLS AND GLENS IN ABERDEENSHIKE. 

betwixt Gairnside and Inchrory, then they go into Glenavin and Cross 
the River of Avin at Loch Avin, afterwards pass through the Braes of 
Glenfechy into the Hills of Badenoch, and then they must pass near 
Loch Cuaigh, Loch Garry, or Loch Erach, after which they can go into 
Rannoch, Lochaber or Glengary as they please. 

When Cattle are stolen from any part betwixt Don and Spey, they 
either take the Route mentioned in the preceeding paragraph, or if the 
Cattle are taken up near Spey, or from any part of Banffshire, they must 
come through the Forrest of the Blackwater and the Hills of Cabrach 
and Glenbucket, into the Hills of Glenoughty and Glenernan, from 
whence they must fall into the Route before mentioned through Glenavin 
or pass at Inchrory or the foord of Carnagavall, and from thence through 
Glenmore in Strathspey, where they may either go by the Braes of 
Glenfichie into the Hills of Badenoch, or pass the Spey at Dellnaverta 
a little below Invereshie, and then up the Hills on the North side of 
Spey, which Road the Glengary and Lochaber Thieves frequently take. 

These are the Routes the Thieves usually take when they Steal Cattle 
from any of the above mentioned Countries, But the Trade is so much 
improved, and the Thieves are so cunning, and have so many faithfull 
Correspondents in the different Countries, even so far down as Buchan, 
that they change their Roads and alter the Measures just as they see 
cause or receive information of Danger. 

When the Thieves who live in the Country are deprived of the Benefit 
of corresponding with their west Country Friends, they carry on a 
Smuggling Trade of their Own, by stealing one, two, or three Cattle at 
a Time, and these they convey from hand to hand, either to the South or 
North, or sometimes to Buchan, or the Low Country, and get Cattle or 
Horses in Exchange, and sometimes Slaughter them at home. 






XXXVI. 

PROPOSALS FOR CANTONING THE FIVE HIGHLAND 

ADDITIONAL COMPANY'S IN THE WESTERN ISLES, 

AND REMOTER PARTS OF THE HIGHLANDS. 

Edinburgh, I4th December, 1747. 

I Compx Isle of Skie. 

/Knoidart. 

I Moidart. 
100 Men, Bernera, to Detatch to j Glenfinnan _ 

VArisaig. 

/Ulst 

Barra. 
50 Men .-_ 

\Canna. 



i Compy. 



Glenmorison. 
Glengarry. 
Locharkaig. 
Glenroy. 
Glenspean. 
^Glenco. 



{Ardnamurchnn. 
Swynard. 
Morvine. 
Isle of Mull. 



51O PROPOSALS FOR CANTONING 

If this Disposition of the Five Additional Company's is approven, the 
following Advantages may arise. 

As the above Countries are mostly inhabited by Roman Catholicks, 
and people disaffected to his Majesty's Government, which with the 
Remoteness of their Situation, makes it very difficult to procure certain 
Intelligence of any Treasonable practices that may be carrying on 
amongst them. 

Tis humbly thought if Detatchments were quartered there, com- 
manded by Active and Trusty Officers, the Government might have an 
early and distinct account of any Treasonable practices that might be 
carrying on in those parts by Foreign or Domestic Enemies, and would 
not only overawe Sculking Rebels, and French Emissaries, but would 
effectually prevent the frequent Impositions of false Alarms, purposely 
hatched by the Invention of the disaffected, to support that Wicked 
Spirit among the Jacobite Party in this Country. 

Knoidart, Moidart, Arisaig and Glenfinnan are almost Void of Cover 
or provisions, which makes it impracticable at present for any but High- 
landers to subsist there. 

'Tis therefore humbly proposed that the Detatchment at Bernera, 
should be ordered to join their Company's at Fort Augustus, and 100 
Highlanders, sent to Bernera, from which place proper Detatchments 
may be made to Knoidart, Moidart, Arisaig, and Glenfinnan, being from 
Experience and the Many Bays and Landing Places on that Coast, the 
most to be suspected for landing Money, Arms, or French Emissaries. 

Those Detatchments may be relieved every fortnight, and supplied 
with necessaries from Bernera. 

That Gen 1 . Bland would order the following Officers to Edinburgh, 
to concert with and be informed of every particular, that may be necessary 
for Rendering their Service effectual, so that there may be no hindrance 
or difficulties Started when he shall judge proper to order them to this 
Cantonement. 

Capt. Campbell at Inverara. 

Capt. Menzies at Taybridge by Crief. 
Lieut. Forbes at Tarland by Aberdeen. 
Lieut. Campbell at Ruthven, and the Officer Commanding 
Sir Henry Monroe's Company in Ross-shire. 



IN THE WESTERN HIGHLANDS. $11 

I humbly beg leave to make the following Observations. 

As the Service proposed must entirely depend on the Spirit, Vigilance, 
and Activity of the Officers, I know from the Experience of those people, 
there's no consideration engages them more to one's Service than a 
seeming confidence and familiarity in recommending a diligent perform- 
ance of their duty. And to explain to them what a favourable opportunity 
this is, for every Man to distinguish himself, and to assure them that 
whatever Merit they can plead, from faithfully discharging their Duty on 
this Service, shall be recommended by you in the Strongest Terms to his 
Majesty, mentioning each particular person, and recommending them for 
a Mark of his Royal Favour. 

It will be absolutely necessary to shew them the necessity there is of 
having constant Patroles, from the several Stations through those Countries. 

The Benefit reaped by Patroles since last Spring, from the Dctatch- 
ments to prevent Depredations, shews plainly their good effect. 

How soon the posts are fixed the Commanding Officer at each station 
is to endeavour to ingratiate himself in the favours of some Person in his 
Neighbourhood, by giving him a Reward, or filling him Drunk with 
Whisky, as often as he may judge proper, which I'm confident is the only 
way to penetrate into the Secrets of these people. 

The Officers Commanding Company's from the Reports made them 
will soon discover whether the good effects of this, will Balance the small 
Expence that may attend it. 

As all Debursements on this Service will be punctually paid, 'Tis 
recommended to the Officers to shew all possible frugality. 

All outposts to send weekly Reports to the Officers commanding 
Company's, those in the Isles excepted, who are to report as often as 
occasion offers, or the Emergency of the Services requires. 

All officers commanding Company's on the Main land to send weekly 
reports, to you by Post, or Express, of the Patrolles sent, the Countries 
they went through, and mentioning all Extraordinary that shall happen. 

As Capt. Campbell of Inveran will have the ComnT 1 . of those 
Company's, 'Tis recommended to order him immediately to Edin r ., to 
communicate this Scheme as he from his knowledge, of the Country, and 
Attachment to the Governm'. is the properest person to give the necessary 
Information, for rendering this intended Service effectual. 



$12 PROPOSALS FOR CANTONING IN WESTERN HIGHLANDS. 

Before the Company's March from their present Quarters, each Man 
to be provided with 24 Rounds of Ammunition, which the Officers are to 
review frequently, to prevent its being embezled or lost from carelessness. 

After it is agreed upon, what number of Men will be sufficient to be 
sent to each of the within mentioned places, those remaining may be 
disposed of, in Rannoch, Dalnacardoch, Dalwhinny, Ruthven and Garvi- 
more, under the Comm d . of Ensign Campbell of Capt. Mackay's Company, 
he being a person particularly acquainted in those parts. 

The post of Taybridge to be occupied from the Reg', at Perth. 

Decem r . 4 th , 1747. (Signed) DAVID WATSON. 

[Lieut. Colonel, Fort Augustus.] 



XXXVII. 
HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS ON THE DIFFERENT HIGHLAND POSTS. 

Sent to Mr. Fox. 

ist Captains Command. 

Capt. Corneille of Col. Herbert's Regiment. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg. 

Report. July nth, 1749. 

Those detachments from Bernara, are pretty well supplyd with 
Necessaries. Glenmorrisson, I have not yet heard from, which I imagine, 
is owing to the Rains we have had these two days past, The other parties 
do not Complain, I cannot say much in praise, of this situation, for the 
people in this part of the country are very poor, two or three Sheep, 
with as many Cows, is the richest man's stock, which they reserve for 
their own use, But I shall either send to fort William, or if possible nearer 
Hand for a Supply. The Country is at present very quiet, And from the 
talk of those few I have Spoken with, they seem pleas'd at their revolu- 
tion, And I believe will gradually shake of that Servitude they shew'd to 
their Chiefs. The Cross ways from party to party are almost Impassable 
to our Men, tho as yet they have struggled through with Cheerfulness ; 
I beg leave to observe that three or four days patroling wears out a pair 
of shoes. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Price of Col. Herbert's Reg mt . 
Under his Command, i sub. Lieut. Bruere. 

Q2 



$14 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-5O. 

Station. Lagan Ach = Adrom. 

Report. 

Meal wanting at several posts, and a Boat to carry it from Bernera. 

A few Cattle stolen from Kelluahn. 



3rd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Hughes of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg 1 . 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. 

That some few Highlanders in different places make use of short 
kind of Trousers, different from the kilt, by which they mean to evade 
the Law. 

4th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Powell of Lord Ancram's Reg'. 

Station. Inversnade Barracks. 

Report. 

The Quarters very defficient, But His Grace the Duke of Montrose, 
has Order'd two Houses to be Built, for the 2 detachments, at Stronaclaker 
and Ackray, And likewise firing to be Cut for them. Two men appre- 
hended, who had as we took it to be the Phillibeg, But they say it is only 
a woman's petticoat, tho the only difference, there fs betwixt the Phillibeg 
and this dress is, that this is somewhat Longer, And not Split down 
before, But to me it seems a Plain evasion of the Act I sent them to 
Major Colquhon who has admitted them to Bail, till he Consults some 
Lawyer. 

5th Captain's Command. 
Capt. Scot of Gen 1 . Guises' Reg mt . 

Under his Command, 2 Sub.] T ! U ' , D ^' 

(.Lieut. Irvine. 

Station. Bramaer Barracks. 
Report. 

The several Parties report, that all is quiet, and that they have not 
seen one Man in Arms or in the Highland Dress, since they were posted. 
A Copy. Cha: Collier, aid de camp. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 515 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS ON THE DIFFERENT HIGHLAND POSTS 
Sent to Mr. Fox. Aug st . 12, 1749. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Corneille of Coll. Herbert's Regiment. 

Under His Command, 4 Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg. 

Report. July 8, 1749. 

Since my Last Nothing Extraordinary has happen'd in my district, 
except one Duncan Cameron, sent prisoner from Glen Leogh, for stealing 
eight Cows, from S r . Alex. Campbell of Argylshire, in the time of the 
Rebellion. 

July 24. 

Since my last Nothing has happen'd extraordinary under my 
Command, But a Continuation of Bad weather has detained these four 
days, the Meal and provisions at the other end of the Loch. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Price of Col. Herbert's Reg nit . 
Under His Command, I Sub. 
Station.' Lagan Ach = Adrom. 
Report. July 20, 1749. 
Nothing extraordinary has happen'd. 



Since my last Angus McDonald, an Inhabitant of this Place, Brought 
me a Warrant from a Justice of peace, at Inverness, for apprehending of 
Arch. Bain McCartney living near Leek Roy, for selling him a Horse 
that was stolen from Ruthven in Baddenoch, I gave him an Order to the 
Serjt. at Leek Roy to assist him who Brought him in prisoner this 
morning to me, I have sent him to Fort Augustus in Order to his being 
forwarded to Inverness where the Warrant directs. 

jrd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Hughes of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg mt . 
Under His Command, 2 Sub. 



5l6 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. July i6th, 1749. 

No extraordinaries have happen'd since Last Report 

July 2Oth. 

Two Orderly Men with Reports from about Strathfillan, Apprehended 
two Highlanders in kilts, And were bringing them to Loch Rannoch, But 
in passing near a Village call'd Clifton, the Inhabitants mostly Women, 
got hold of one of the Soldiers, and the Prisoner made his escape. The 
other Soldier with the Man he had taken, got some Miles farther on his 
way, when the Inhabitants of another Village, assisted by two disbanded 
Highlanders, arm'd with sticks, rescued the other. The disbanded 
Soldiers were extremely abusive and Insolent, And threatened the Soldier 
very much (who had only his Side Arms) if ever he molested their 
Neighbours again, I thought Insults of this Nature were not to be pass'd 
over, for which reason I have sent a party Back, with the Orderly Men, 
who in their patroling, have had opportunities, of knowing where the 
disbanded Highlanders, and those whom they had taken live, to endeavour 
to secure them all, And if they are successful!, I shall send them before 
Clark Millan at Perth, who I hope will punish them, for insulting the 
soldiers in the execution of their Duty. 

From Major Crawford, Perth. 

Augt. 7th, 1749. 

The Detachment of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg mt . in Rannoch sent in to 
this place, on friday Night five Highlanders, taken up for wearing the 
Highland Dress Contrary to Law ; they were Carried next Morning 
before Mr. Richardson, one of the Sheriffs Depute for this County, who 
acquitted one, as having a Blue upper Coat, but the other four, were 
Committed to Goal, in terms of the Act of Parliament, Viz. : one for 
wearing Trouse, And three for having Plaid upper Coats, They are 
Tenants to S r . Robt. Menzies, and from the Parish of Fothrington. 

<f.th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Powell of Lord Ancram's Reg mt . 
Under His Command, 2 Sub. 
Station. Inversnade Barracks. 
Report. July 23, 1749. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 517 

Yesterday was sevennight, I apprehended a fellow for wearing the 
kilt, But upon my examining him found that he was one of the Thieves 
of this Country, On which I immediately acquainted the duke of Montrose 
of it, His Grace Immediately sent one of His Gentlemen to this place 
who desires me, to keep the Man, untill a Warrant is obtained for his 
Committment to Stirling, they being determined to prosecute him. Lord 
Ancram has been at Inversnade and reports that a Boat is greatly Wanted, 
on Loman for the use of the Garrison, to send for provision and necessaries. 

$th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Scot of Genl. Guises' Reg m '. 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Bramaer Barracks. 

Report. July 23, 1749. 

Since my Last of the 9th Inst. nothing has happen'd and all is well. 

Aug. 4. 

I have apprehended a Man for wearing the Plaid Contrary to Act of 
Parliament, he had not only a Plaid on, But had under it carrying a party 
colour'd great Coat, I immediately sent Him in that dress over to Invercald, 
who is a Justice of the Peace, and used to give orders for Quartering, of 
any parties that came here, Invercald told the Serg'. that he did not now 
act as a Justice of peace, nor had not done for some time past ; therefore 
desired him to go to some other Justice, As I cannot hear of any one in 
the Neighbourhood, I have sent the Man to Aberdeen, to be punished as 
the Law directs. The country people have good news, as they call it 
amongst them ; this fellow came past the Castle in his Plaid with all the 
assurance Imaginable. Since the 23d of July Nothing has happened at 
any of the out parties, and all is well. 

Note. The Ridiculous News amongst them is that the Pretender, is 
Landed, in Long Island with 20000 Men, which Spirits them up greatly. 

A copy. Cha: Collier, aid de camp. 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS ON THE DIFFERENT HIGHLAND POSTS. 
September i2th, 1749. Sent to Mr. Fox. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Corneille of Col. Herbert's Reg mt . 
Under His Command, 4 Sub. 



5l8 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg. 

Report Aug st . 6th, 1749. 

Nothing has happened under my command since my last report. 

Aug st . 21. Glenleogh. 

Nothing extraordinary has happened in my district since my Last, 
I left a Command of Six Men at Loch Arkeg and moved to this station 
for the conveniency of provision and meal, which could come no longer 
at Arkeg on account of the waters, having left what Meal I had with the 
party there, which with Mangment may serve them four weeks, I hope 
you will approve this alteration as intended for the better. 



2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Price of Col. Herbert's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, i Sub. 

Station. Lagan Ach : Adrom. 

Report. Aug 1 . I7th, 1749. 

I received Capt. Collier's letter and shall do my utmost 

endeavour to comply with H.R.H.'s Orders. I have been conversing 
with the Gentlemen, and principal Taxmen in this part of the Country, 
who in General think Our Soldiers, as able to do this Duty, as the 
Highland Companies, And say that now they expect Justice done them, 
which they did not get from the Highlanders, who had a Number of 
Relations, and Friends, And shcw'd a great deal of partiality, when in 
pursuit of Cattle, And for my own part think them as able to do the 
Duty as they were, being now accustomed to it, But at first did not 
relish it. The Man that I reported to you, that I had sent to Inverness 
Tolbooth for stealing a Mare is now out upon Bail, and By what I can 
learn is not to be tryed, having paid some Money more than the Value 
of the Mare, it being a common practice amongst them, which is 
encouraging of Theft, And till there is a Stop put to these pernicious 
practices And a few of them hanged at the Government's expence, they 
not being able to carry on a prosecution, there never will be a stop put to 
Thieving. 

The Serjt. at Glencoe reports that on Sunday the 7 Inst. as two of his 
party were going with his report to the Corp 1 , at Loch Leven, they saw 
Duncan Cameron of Kinlochbegg wearing a Highland Plaid And when 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, I74Q-5O. 519 

he saw the soldiers he gave the Plaid to his Servant Maid and made of 
as fast as he could, the men persued him But could not overtake him, so 
returned Back and took the Plaid from his Servant, the Serj 1 . has been in 
search of him two or three times, but to no purpose, as he is a Man of 
some fortune And was in the late Rebellion, think him a proper person 
to make him an example of, so have sent a description of Him to all the 
parties, and Don't Doubt but I shall soon have him prisoner. 

Sept. i. Lagan Ach = Adrom. 

On the ipth of Last Month two Horses were stolen from this place 
and on the 22d I got Intelligence that they were drove over the Hills 
towards Gorvy More, as I was well acquainted with those Hills took four 
Men with me, And found the Horses tied up on a very high one, but 
could not get any Intelligence who it was that stole them, I brought the 
Horses back, deliver'd them to ye owners, the Thieves had cut their 
Taills of. 

Inclos'd have sent you a letter I received from Lieut. Bruere, And am 
told by the Country people that Keapoch is a pass of Much greater 
importance than Bohuntire, And am likewise told that Lady Keapoch 
did not like the sight of the read Coats as her Husband was kill'd by 
them so got sombody to misrepresent it to you, nothing else extraordinary 
has happened since my Last. 

jrd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Hughes of G 1 . Pulteney's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. August I2th, 1749. 

Since last report, the Patroles took up in the Neighbourhood of 
Rannoch, Duncan McGregor, Donald M c gregor, Donald McGregor, John 
Cameron, Alex. Robinson and John Cameron, I sent them to Perth, and 
four of them were committed for wearing cloaths contrary to Act of 
Parliament. 

This week the patroles between here and Killin took up Ten men, 
some of them dress'd in Tartan Trowyes and petticoats, short coats and 
shoulder straps and one Man Compleatly Dress in Tartan Cloaths and 
Trowyer, But Mr. Campbell the Sheriff Depute, at that place dismissed 



52O HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

them all. We also recovered the two Men, who had been rescued at 
Clifton in Kilts, without any alteration in their Dress, than Just Sewing 
the Kilt close before, in that manner they were sent before Mr. Campbell 
who also dismiss'd them, tho the Soldiers offer'd to Swear they were open 
when first apprehended, The two disbanded Highlanders have absconded 
ever since, I must be oblig'd to send my Prisoners for the future to Perth, 
as that Gentleman seems Resolved to commit none of them. 

Sept. ist, 1749. 

Last week a party of Highlanders Compleatly Arm'd were seen at 
Killycranky, they either had been or were going in pursuit of plunder, 
six was the number I was informed of, though I hear they belonged to a 
party much more Considerable, three or four days past before the Intel- 
legence came to me which rendered the pursuit the more difficult, I 
immediately sent out a serj 1 . and eight men in quest of them and intended 
to have march'd of with the remainder of my Party if he found any 
probability of coming up with them, But all the Intellegence he could 
get was that they had seperatcd. He followed some of them to the 
neighbourhood of Aberfeldie, but could trace them no further, the 
Inhabitants being afraid or resolute not to make any discovery. 

.... As I heard the people about Killin continued to wear the 
Trowzers I before reported and being sensible it was to no purpose to 
send them before the Deputy Sheriff: I ordered the Corp 1 , who com- 
manded there, to send me any Prisoners he should make, as I intended 
to try if some other Magistrates would not suppress that Dress. The 
Corp 1 , accordingly took up two and was conducting them to me, when 
the Sheriff came up to him, And before a Mob that was gathered 
peremptorily ordered the Soldiers at their Peril to dismiss them im- 
mediately, or he would that Instant Order them all to prison, at the same 
time abusing them greatly, for Molesting people in a Dress he thought 
proper to tolerate. He likewise told them in the hearing of the Mob, 
that if they continued to apprehend the Inhabitants, they were to expect 
whatever usage their resentment might Suggest to them ; I don't Doubt 
but the Country people will look upon that as a Tacit approbation of any 
Violence they will think proper to offer, And two of the Soldiers who 
have been particularly active have been already threaten'd to be Murdered 
if they don't desist. The Soldiers who were a little Terrified with the 
threats of prison, And meeting with same Usage, their Comrades did 






HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 521 

before, gave up their prisoners, the people insult and Triumph, And 
while their Sheriff protects them, make a Jest of a Military power, all 
the other parts of the hills, very readily conform to the Lowland Dress. 



j.th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Powell of Lord Ancram's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Inversnaid Barracks. 

Report. Aug 31 . 30, 1749. 

Yesterday I received an Account from the Detach'd Serg 1 . (from this 
Garrison) at Achray, that on friday last, 5 Horses were stole from the 
near from Dugal Graham, And that on the 

Monday following, the owner of the Horses apply'd for a party to pursue 
the Thieves, which was Immediately Granted, But as it was too Late to 
pursue the Tract of the Horses, by the desire of the owner they return'd 
to their post the same Night. He likewise informs me that on Sunday 
last a person was seen (within a Mile of his Command) Dress'd in the 
Highland Dress, Arm'd with a firelock, pistol and Durk and Broad sword ; 
The Serj 1 . in this information, (which he did not get untill Monday,) went 
out with a party in the Night to the several passes but found all very quiet. 



5t/t Captain's Command. 

Capt. Scot of Gen 1 . Guises' Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Breamar Castle. 

Report. Aug'. roth, 1749. 

In my last report of the 4t Instant, I mentioned to you that I had 
taken up a Man for wearing the Plaid and had sent him to Aberdeen, as 
Mr. Farquson of Inver Cald did not act as a Justice of the Peace. The 
Serg 1 . who went with the Prisoner is now return'd, and informs me that 
he carry'd the prisoner before the Sheriff of the County, with his plaid 
on as first taken. The Sheriff said in the prisoner's behalf, that it was 
only a Dyed Blanket, and not a Plaid, the Serg 1 . ask'd the Sheriff if the 
people might wear their Plaids if Dyed, the Sheriff told the Serg'., that 

R 2 



522 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

the intent of the Act of parliament, was not to oppress the poor and 
dismiss'd the prisoner, notwithstanding the Sheriff 1 s Judgment, I shall 
take up all persons that I find wearing those Dy'd Blanketts as the 
Sheriff is pleas'd to call them. 

Aug'. 20th. 

Since my last I have taken up and sent to Aberdeen another 
Highlander, for having a Plaid of different colours, which I think the 
Sheriff cannot well call a Blanket, as he was pleased to call the other. 



Col. Watson's Report from the Highlands, dated August 24, from 

Coiilnacaille. 

As I have seen most of the Highland posts south side the Chain and 
everywhere enquired as to the Effects of those Detachments I am sure it 
will be most agreeable to you to hear that their services hitherto has 
greatly surpass'd what I once thought well possible, Not the least stealing 
and the natives Complying with Change of Dress, more exactly than 
could have been expected. 
Aug st . 28. 

After my last letter from Coulnaill I visited the Country betwixt the 
north side of Spay and Murry ferth to see what passes were left un- 
guarded in the Head of Murry, whilst I was upon this route, I received 
the following Intelligence y'on the 22d Inst. three Highlanders in Kelted 
Plaids and with side arms drove from Dunfaile in Brea Murry twelve 
Cowes and three Horses the Contry (men?) after following their Cattle 
2 days recovered them within half a mile of Carrybragh, But the Thieves 
escap'd. 

As there is no party in the long tract of Country betwixt Ruthven 
and Badenoch and Ruthven in Strathenik its absolutely necessary to have 
a Detachment of a Corp 1 , and 4 Men from Inverness at a place call'd 
Elian about three miles from Carrybrough which party I am hopefull will 
effectually protect the Country. 

Note. The party of a Corpl. and 4 men mentioned by C. Watson to 
be att Elian is order'd. 

A Copy. Chas: Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 523 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS ON THE DIFFERENT HIGHLAND POSTS. 
October the 12, 1749. Sent to Mr. Fox. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Corneille of Col. Herbert's Regiment. 

Under his Command, 4 Sub. 

Station. Glen Luy. 

Report. Sept. 4, 1749. 

Since my last nothing has happened in my district as to Thieving, 
but some men were taken prisoners, by the Moving parties for wearing 
the Highland dress, two of the name of McDonald Servants to McDonald 
of Greenfield are sent prisoners to fort Augustus, one Duncan McCloud 
living in Glenelg is for the same sent prisoner to Bernera, and Angus 
Cameron a servant to Cameron of Glen Nevis at Fort William. No 
other extraordinarys. 

Sept. 1 8. 

In the Neighbourhood of my Command, nothing extraordinary since 
my last. The Communication to the district posts, have been interrupted 
this fortnight past by the greatness of the Waters, everything in my 
district is quiet and the Country as yet, have conformed entirely to the 
Laws. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Price of Col. Herbert's Regiment. 
Under His Command, i Sub. 
Station. Lagan Ach : Adrom. 
Report. 

Nothing extraordinary since Last Report, only 17 Goats recovcr'd 
that were stolen from Hugh Frazer of Glen Do. 

jrd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Hughes of Gen'. Pulteney's Regiment. 
Under his Command, 2 Sub. 
Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 



524 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-5O. 

Report. Sept. 20, 1749. 

We have had Intelligence that three of those thieves who appeared 
at Killycranky are gone towards the Braes of Angus, I have upon that 
sent to all the posts upon the North road, to patrole frequently till 
further Orders, through all the passes where Cattle may be drove, that 
leads from that Country. I have been this week at Killin where every- 
thing now is quiet, I hope upstart Dresses, are prohibited, and everything 
is Conformable to Law. 

Ocf. i, 1749. 

The Patroles of Killin took up one Duncan Campbell, the 22d day of 
September, for wearing Tartan Cloaths, and he is Confined in the prison 
of Killin. 

On Sunday night Last, the three men whom I reported to have gone 
north in arms, made an attack upon some Droveres at the Bridge of 
Tumble who were going to the fair at Crieff, and took from them six 
Cows, the owners omitted tracking their Cattle, and went on with the 
remainder, I sent out Patroles different ways, as soon as I knew what had 
happened, on thursday morning one of the patroles saw the thieves at a 
little Distance, who had disposed of their Plunder and pursued them a 
considerable way, but the Highlanders being lighter arm'd and Dress'd 
maintained the advantage they had at first setting out, and by favour of 
a Large Wood made their escape, and all future search was fruitless, The 
Thieves ran amongst a number of the Country people who were employed 
at their Harvest but they would give no assistance in stopping them. 

4.1/1 Captain's Command, 

Capt. Powell of Lord Ancram's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Invcrsnade Barracks. 

Report 

Nothing Extraordinary since the last. 

Jt/i Captain's Command. 

Capt. Scott of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 
Under His Command, 2 Sub. 
Station. Breamar Barracks. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 525 

Report. Sept. 16, 1749. 

I have received all the reports from the out parties, and all is well 
with them and here, only we had a Race after a Highlander who appear'd 
in Highland Dress and compleatly armed he fairly outrun all the party, 
and as he was going into a wood, we fired upon him, but miss'd him, but 
I Imagine we shall see him no more in that dress. 

Ocf. i. 

The Serj 1 . of the party at Dubrach has been Missing ever since 
Thursday morning, I am much afraid that the poor man is murdered, as 
he was very Active in his Duty, and two days before that he was in pursuit 
of 4 men, which appear'd in arms and in the Highland Garb which I 
suppose to be thieves ; I have sent another Serj 1 . in his room and two 
men to reenforce that party, and have given the serj'. Orders, to search 
all that Country for the serj 1 . missing, by the next opportunity shall 
acquaint you of the success. 

There has been no Cattle reported to me, on any of my out parties to 
have been stolen as yet. 

A Copy. Chas: Collier, Aid de Camp. 



THE REPORT OF THE CAPTAINS ON THE DIFFERENT HIGHLAND 
POSTS. Novem. 14, 1749. Being the last this year. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Captain Corneille of Col. Herbert's. 

Under His Command, 4 Sub. 

Station. Glen Ley. 

Report. Oct r . 16, 1749. 

That part of the Country in my district, seem hitherto to have 
Conform'd to the Laws, none appearing in any part in the Highland 
Dress ; And as to thieving it seems entirely to be abolish 'd from amongst 
them, but whether owing to their Natural disposition or our situation 
amongst them, I cannot determine, but am inclined to believe the latter 
has the greatest sway ; But the Bad weather is now approaching, when 
it will be out of their power to exert themselves that way, and I shall use 
my best endeavours, to prevent any attempts of that kind. 



526 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 

Oct. 29. 

Nothing extraordinary has happened within the limits of my Com- 
mand, the situation of the Troops, has prevented thieving, in this part of 
the Highlands, as the best in this Country acknowledge, I have received 
your order and the Route for Marching on the 10 of November next, 
The Command at Strath Cluny was removed according to your orders to 
Kintail, one man of that party was lost crossing the waters nothing more 
extraordinary. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Price of Col. Herbert's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, i Sub. 

Station. Lagan Ach = Adrom. 

Report. 

Nothing has occurr'd since my last. 



jrd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Hughes of Genl. Pulteney's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. Oct. 15, 1749. 

On the fifth of this month, Duncan Campbell and His Son inhabitants 
of Glen falloch, were apprehended in Highland Cloaths by the moving 
Patrole and are Confined in the Toll Booth of Killin. 

Oct. 23. 

The party at Killin took up the 15 of this month in the Braes of 
Balquhidder, one Duncan McGregor for Horse stealing, the horse is 
return'd to the owner, and the Thief Confined at Killin. A Soldier of 
Col. Herbert's Regiment belonging to the party at Garvimore, was 
drown'd this week, in Crossing the Spey. 



4.tk Captain's Command. 

Capt. Phillips of Lord Ancram's Reg*. 
Under His Command, 2 Sub. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1 749- SO. 527 

Station. Inversnade Barracks. 

Report. 

I am to inform you that I have had no Intelligence of any Thefts 
Committed in the Country since Capt. Powell's Last report. 

The people in this Country have all Conform'd to the Act of Parlia- 
ment in Laying aside the Highland Dress. 

Note. Some time ago Capt. Powell was taken so ill that he desired 
to be relieved. 

$th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Scot of Genl. Guise's Regiment. 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Braemar Barracks. 

Report. Oct. 4, 1749. 

In my last of the I. Instant I mentioned, that the Serjeant of the 
Party at Dubrach had been missing since the 28 of September, I have 
had a servant and ten men in search for him, but can hear nothing of 
him, my reasons for suspecting that the Serjeant is Murder'd are as he 
was very alert and Diligent in his Duty, and that morning he went up to 
the Mountains for his diversion, a Country Boy heard three Guns go off, 
immediately after, the Serj 1 . they tell me, was so imprudent as to always 
have his Money about him, and to shew it upon all occasions, he has left 
all his Linnen and a silver Hilted sword behind him, which in my opinion 
is plain that he is not deserted. 

Oct. 23. 

I have taken up and sent to Aberdeen two Highlanders, one for 
wearing a party Colour'd Great Coat, the other for wearing the Plaid, 
And Lieut. Moody at Corgarf, has taken up four Highlanders, and is to 
send them to aberdcen to Morrow. 

Oct. 30. 

No Cattle has been reported to have been stolen, since we came into 
this Country. 

As there has been a great deal of snow, it is impossible for the 
Moving patroles to go their rounds. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid -de-Camp. 




528 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

SINCE the Highland posts were Call'd of, the Reports of Capt. Clarke 
of the welsh Fusileers who reliev'd Capt. Scot at Braemar Castle. 

Novem: 22, 1749. 

Braemar Castle. 

At the Earl of Aberdeen's request / a fair being to be held at Tarland 
and it being Gen 1 , attended with Riotous people to the great disturbance 
of the Market ; I caus'd a Serj 15 . Command to prevent what might 
probably ensue, it had its desired Effect, and for which I had His 
Lordship's thanks, it being a fair for Cattle, I took the advantage, and 
sent some men in order to drive what Cattle we might get home, the 
Cattle we Bought there together with what we got here are in all thirty 
six. Invercald desired me to report, that it would be of great advantage 
to the Garrison, to have the ground enclos'd, as it would prevent any 
disputes between the Country people and us. The whole Rooms of the 
Garrison smoke to that degree, that we can scarce see one another. 

To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 

December 6, 1749. 

Braemar Castle. 

S r . I received a Letter by Gen 1 . Churchill's Order purporting I was 
to accomodate, the Men in the best manner I could, I have accordingly 
done so, as also a room the most Convenient, for the Barrack Master and 
His Stores. 

Nothing extraordinary has happen'd in the Garrison of Brae Mar or 
Corgarff, save only a Corpl. and Eight Men conducted two fellows for 
stealing their Neighbour Cattle to aberdeen. 
To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign) ESME CLARKE. 

Jan. 3d., 1749/5. 

Report of Braemar and Corgarf Castles. 
The Detachment at Braemar well. At Corgarf four Men sick. 
To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 



' 

yw&tim 







s 



\i 



za 







- 






w 
Report of fiKK. Mar ,md L 

All's well in every respect. 
To Aid-de-Camp. 

Jan: 29, 1749/5 

Report fw f:< f rs* 

I have never heard 'F a y ';.;-.:: 
Committed in this Ni . 
according to your Or<ii- 



Feb. 5, 1749/50 

S r . As the firi; 
Barrack, has of latr 
to dress their Meat v 
your Excellenc v ill 
Coals from Glasgo- 
o%vne part I can a^-i 
last nothing cxtrai i 



F.S. Major I. 

f the Har 



Feb. 1 6, 1749 ,c. 

S r . 1 he Soldiers havii.,- f:oq .; 
ley find it extremely ino>r>vviic 
M- that purpose, I therefore apprc 
lajesty's Sen'ice, that there should 
the officer commanding mnld tli 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 529 

Jan: 15, 1749/50. 

Report of Brae Mar and Corgarf. 

All's well in every respect. 
To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 

Jan: 29, I749/5O. 

Report from Inversnade Barracks. 

I have never heard of any depredations, or theifts which have been 
Committed in this Neighbourhood since I came here, and I shall 
according to your Order send you a report of this Quarter every fortnight. 

(Sign'd) RICHARD PHILLIPS. 

Feb. 5, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade. 

S r . As the firing I mean the peats, layd up for the use of this 
Barrack, has of late turn'd so Bad, that it's impossible for the Soldiers, 
to dress their Meat which they have made their case known to me, I hope 
your Excellenc will give Orders so as this may be remedied, by having 
Coals from Glasgow, or wood bought up in this Neighbourhood, for my 
owne part I can assure you, I have not had a fire this two days, since my 
last nothing extraordinary has happen'd in this Quarter and am & 

(Sign'd) RICHARD PHILLIPS. 

P.S. Major Lesley's agent has been acquainted by the Barrack- 
Master of the Badness of the firing. 

Feb. 1 6, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade. 

S r . The Soldiers having frequently occasion to cross Loch Loman, 
they find it extremely inconvenient, as well as expensive, to hire Boats 
for that purpose, I therefore apprehend it would be requisite for His 
Majesty's Service, that there should be one belonging to the Detachment, 
as the officer commanding could then in case of emergency send across 

S 2 



5.3O HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

the Loch, which he cannot so well do now, the Boat being the property 
of a private person. I must beg leave Sir, to represent to you the 
necessity there is of having Peat Houses, to shelter the Turf stacks from 
the Heavy rains, which fall incessantly, and render them almost useless 
to the soldiers. I am &c. 

(Sign'd) PETER DESBRISAY. 

Feb. 28, 1749/50. 

Report from Braemar and Corgarf. 

Nothing extraordinary has happen'd since my Last, save only I seiz'd 
a Durk from one John Michy, Forrester to Lord Brachet, in other respects 
alls well. I am &c. 

To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 



March 2, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade. 

S r . Since my last nothing extraordinary has Happen'd on this 
Detachment. I am &c. 

(Sign'd) P. DESBRISAY. 

March 10, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade, 

Nothing extraordinary has happen'd since my last. I am &c. 

(Sign'd) PETER DESBRISAY. 

March 1 1, 1749 '50. 

Report of Braemar and Corgarf. 

As nothing hath happen'd since my last I may venture to say all's 
well. I am &c. 

To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) EsME CLARKE. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 531 

March II, 1749/50. 

Report of Braemar atid Corgarff. 

In Obedience to Orders I transmitt to you, I never received any 
Orders from Capt. Scot of Gen 1 . Churchill's of the 31 of Jany: 1748/9. 
And likewise Lieut. Leslie the same. 

In regard to the Rooms appointed for the Barrack Master, I had 
Gen 1 . Churchill's Orders Dated the 23 of Novem: last, that I was to 
accommodate my men in the best manner possible, and to let the Barrack 
Master, have a Room for himself and stores, that I could the most 
conveniently spare, which I accordingly did and reported it to the Gen 1 , 
the Barrack Master had at the same time, a letter signifying I had an 
Order for that purpose, sign'd Jam 5 Stewart ass', to the Q r . M r . General. 
Lieut. Leslie informs me, there is a small Room, for the Barrack Master 
of that Garrison, Built by one Misset, but by whose Order he can't tell, 
in other respects all's well. I am c. 

To Aid-de-Camp. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 



March 6, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade. 

S r . Agreeable to your Orders I have enquired into the Number of 
Rooms, that are at present made use of by the Barrack Master, as well 
for his own use, as for that of the Stores, which I find to be as follows, 
two for himself, one for Beds Beding &c. one for the Canteen, and one 
for Coals : he says he received that number from the Barrack Master he 
relieved, about six Months ago, but cannot tell by whose Order, they 
were converted to those uses. 

(Sign'd) PETER DESBRISAY. 

March 24, 1749/50. 

Report from Inversnade. 

Nothing extraordinary hath happen'd on the Detachment of Colonel 
Bockland's Regiment at Inversnade, since my Last report. 

(Sign'd) PETER DESBRISAY. 



532 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

March 27th, 1750. 

Report of Braemar and Corgarf. 

All's well. My Duty to the General. 

(Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 

April loth, 1750. 

Report from Braemar and Corgarff. 

All's Well. (Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 

April 23d, 1750. 

Report from Inversnade. 

I received your Order for the Boat, which I am to get from Mr. Alex. 
Houstone, Merchant at Glasgow, and shall as soon as I receive a letter 
from him, acquaint you with it, as well as the particulars belonging to 
the Boat. 

Since my last report, a Corporal and some Soldiers apprehended a 
Highlander for carrying Arms in the shire of Stirling and parish of 
Buchanan, they brought him to a Justice of the Peace, whose name is 
will Buchanan who told the Corporal he would give him a receipt for the 
Gun and enquire whether the man, lived within the bounds of the 
disarming act. But the Corporal says he dismiss'd the Highlander, and 
was likewise inform'd that he return'd him the Gun. 

(Sign'd) PETER DESBRISAY. 

April 24, 1750. 

Report from Braemar and Corgarf. 

A Soldier found in a Wood three french Bayonets, a Gun Barrell, and 
a Dirk. In other respects all's Well. 

(Sign'd) ESME CLARKE. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 533 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS AND OFFICERS ON THE HIGHLAND 

POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Captain Swettenham of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 4 Subalterns. 

Station. Head of Loch. Loch Arkaig or Glen Leogh. 

Report. June u, 1750. Glen Leogh. 

From the Head Quarters of Glen Leogh I Visited the several posts 
in my district, viz'. 

From Glen Leogh to Bonarkaig 6 miles, a post of great Consequence 
as I am inform'd, but not Mentioned in the Route, where I have posted 
I. Copl. and 4 men who scour'd the mountains Betwixt it and the head 
of Loch Arkaig, on the 5th Instant and found all well. 

From Loch Arkaig to Tray in South Morra 19 Miles (where Lt. 
Maxwell Commands). Lieut. Maxwell visited the several posts in his 
district, and gave me a report. 

From Tray in South Morra to Glen Finnan 25 Miles where Ensign 
Patton Commands. Ensign Patton on his arrival at Glen Finnan, found 
three fire locks Hid under a Rock, one of which was loaded and one 
wanting of a lock. His party scour'd the Mountains and met the party 
from Loch Arkaig at the Head of Glen Pain on the 6. Inst. and found 
all well. He has likewise posted I Corpl. and 3 men at the Head of 
Loch Yeol, who are to Corresponde once a Week with his party, and 
once a Week to scour the Mountains. 

From Glen Finnan to Strontian 16 Miles (where Ensign Cay Com- 
mands). On the 3 ist past a party was demanded from Ensign Cay, 
consisting of I Corpl. and 6 men, by Mr. McLean to go in pursuit of two 
Cows, stolen from him, the party set out at 10 o'clock forenoon and did 
not return till 9 o'clock next Night and Brought no prisoner the party 
followed the track to the Lands of Argour, where they Lost the tract, 
and got a note for the Value of the Cows. 



534 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Ensign Cay's Party scour'd the Mountains, on the 3rd Inst. towards 
the Head of Loch Sheil and found all well. 

Ensign Irving who Commands the Moving patrole, has been his 
Circuit by the following posts, Viz 1 ., from Glen Leogh up Arkaig Side to 
the Head of the Loch Arkaig. From thence thro' Glen Dissery and 
along the side of Loch Morra, to Tray in Morra, from thence thro' Glen 
Dissery and Glen Pain, to Glen Finnan, from thence by Loch Sheil, to 
the Head of Loch in Dolet and to Strontian, from thence thro" Glen 
Tarbot to the Current of Argour and along Lochaber side to Glen 
Leogh, and found all well. 

Price of provision pretty reasonable. 

Disposition of the Detachment Under the Commasd of Capt. 
Swettenham. 

1$ ?L .d I- I B 

o o a = S o J 

z u x & o 2 

1 i i 3 Glen Leogh. 

2 i 4 Bonarkaig. 

3 i 8 Head of Loch Arkaig. 

4 i i 7 Glen Finnan. 

5 i 3 Head of Loch Yeol. 

6 i i 2 15 Strontian. 
,,i i i 20 Moving Patrole. 

i 3 5 5 60 Total. 



N.B. There is a Corpl. and three Men added from the Regiment by 
the Order of Col. Rich, to reinforce the party of Strontian, and are 
Quarter'd on one John McCainn who keeps a whisky House at Inversandy. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENHAM. 



Lieut. Maxwell's Report. 
Head Quarters. Tray in South Morra. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 535 

Kinlochoom where there a serj 1 . and 5 men is a Glen at the Head of 
Loch Hoom, which is a fine Bay Running about 10 Miles up the Country 
from the Sea some parts, three miles broad, enclos'd by very high hills, 
the Head of the Loch is Computed 8 Miles from Bernera ; about 4 Miles 
down the Loch Lies Glen Barrisdale, where old Barrisdale Lives. I 
spoke with him and gave him a Copy of my advertisement, which he said 
he would explain to His people and make them Obey it. This Glen is 
about one Mile Long with a small river running thro' it, from this I 
ascended very High Mountains and Rocks about two Miles, and came 
down into another Glen call'd Glen Dulachin about 5 Miles Long where 
there is a fresh Water lake about one Mile long, from which runs a River 
about 3 Miles, and empties itself in Loch Nevis a Large Arm of the Sea, 
which divides Knoidart from North Morra, this Loch is in some places 
6 Miles Broad and 4 Long, on the North Side of it stand the Ruins of 
young Barrisdale's house, which was Burnt Down, in the Year 1746. 
Near this lies Knap where I cross'd the Nevis to a place Call'd Mullig, 
about 5 Miles over, from thence march'd over Mountains but near the 
Sea, about 6 Miles, when I came to Bayorat on the side of Loch Morra, 
where there is a Corpl. and 4 men there is a house built for the soldiers 
last year, Loch Morra is a Large fresh water Loch, in which there is 
several Islands from one of which Lord Lovat retir'd on seeing Capt. 
Fergusons Boat brought into the Lake in 1746. Here is a good deal of 
wood thro' which we pas't, from this Bayorat we march'd down the side 
of the Loch, and cros'd a small river which Runs from it into the Sea 
and came to South Morra where I waited upon the Laird of Morra, as 
he is call'd, and gave him likewise a. Copy of the advertisement which he 
promis'd to obey and make his people do so likewise. This Gentleman 
is very serviceable to all my parties round him in making the Country 
people supply them with what they can afford at reasonable prices. 
From this I pass'd on to Tray, a small Village about 6 Miles from 
Bayorat, where I stay myself with a corpl. and 6 men, about 2 miles 
farther Lys Keppoch in Arrasaig, another little Village where is a 
Serjeant and five men. These are all my stations and from Kinlochoom 
to Keppoch cross the Lochs is about 25 Miles and round the Lochs 
reckon'd 50 Miles and upwards. In all this Circuit nothing material 
happen'd, the people are all very Quiet and no thefts committed this 
summer or any complaints made. 



536 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 

Disposition of the parties under Command of Lieut. Maxwell of 
Gen 1 . Guise's Regiment. 

"' X G> "O- C 

ii i i a i 



I 


i 


H 


I 


6 


Tray in North Morra. 


Head 


Quarters. 


2 


) 


i 


) 


5 


Loch Hoom. 






3 


I) 


i 


)J 


5 


Keppoch in Arrasig. 






4 


II 





I 


4 


Bayorat, On the side of 


Loch 


Morra. 




i 


2 


2 


20 


Total. 







2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Molesworth of Gen 1 . Guise's Regiment. 

Station. Laggan Achadrom. 

Report. June 5, 1750. 

On Tuesday the 22 day of May I arrived at my post of Laggan 
Achadrom, having detach'd by the way the several parties whose post 
lay Convenient for it, I immediately posted the other detachments as 
Order'd in the Route, and caus'd The Advertisement Contain'd in my 
Orders to be affix'd to the several Church Doors within my District and 
gave Copys of it to some Gentlemen of the Country to be explain to 
their Tennants and dispersed among them. I have Visited every 
detachment within my district, and have appointed to every Detach- 
ment, (excepting that at Strathglass, which has no party to the Eastward 
of it) two patroles pr. Week, and to meet at such places as I found most 
Conveniently situated for that purpose, Ordering them nevertheless as 
their knowledge of the Country shall increase to Vary the place, as well 
as the Day of their meeting that the schemes of the Thieves may be the 
more effectually disconcerted. The Country people, tho the Soldiers say 
they are Civil in their deportment to them, impose without Measure in 
the place of provisions, and this Complaint is Universal thro' all my 
parties. The Country seems quiet and all the parties detach'd from me 
have remain'd without any information of Cattle Stolen, nor have they 
found any person in Highland dress. 






HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 537 

I send you as my Order directs a detail of my posts, with the Number 
of Miles as Computed in this Country, but the Number of English Miles 
measured would be near Double. 

I 1 6 I I 1 I 

i i i ro Laggan Achadrom. Head Quarters. 

9 i i 8 Head of Glen Morrison. 

8 i ,,6 Knochlin Height of Strathglass. 

8 i ,,8 Strath Cluney. 

9 i 6 Head of Glenshiel. [by Glen Do. 
12 i 6 Balachan between Loch Garry and Loch Quick 
1 8 i ,,6 Garvimore and Garvibeg, by Laggan Achadrom. 

7 r 5 Leach Roy. Head of Glen Roy. 

10 ,,,,15 Head of Glenspean, through Glen Roy. 

10 ,,,,15 High Bridge. 

3 ,, i 4 Nine Mile Bridge, 

i i i 20 Moving patrole. 



Total i 2 5 9 89 

I have the reports of all the parties which Contain nothing extra- 
ordinary excepting what I have represented above in relation to provision. 

As to my own at Laggan Ach = Adrom I am to acquaint you that on 
the 27th May the Patrol seiz'd Alester McDonel wearing a Plaid who 
was committed to jail by the Sheriff of Inverness at my Instance and 
on the 29th May at the complaint of Alexr. McLaughlan of Corwannan 
I took up arch d . Kennedy with a Cow and Calf in his possession, and 
sent him prisoner to Inverness, where he was committed to jail by the 
Sheriff, but since Bail'd. The Cow and Calf remain in my Custody the 
said McLaghlan not appearing to Claim them. 

The ist June my party recover'd a Horse Stolen from Alexr. McDonell 
of Strathglass and restor'd him to his owner, they pursued the thief who 
was arm'd and in Highland Dress, but Night coming on he escap'd in a 
Wood. 

And on the 4th June I reduced Alexr. Kennedy of Bragath in Glen 
Roy to Composition with John McDonell of Shenan for a Horse stolen 
two years ago. 

(Sign'd) J. MOLESWORTH. 

T 2 



538 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 



jrd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 
Station. Ruthven in Baddenock. Head Quarters. 
Report. June 2, 1750. 

Agreeable to your Orders, immediately upon my arrival here, I 
detach'd from my Command, the outposts specified in my Route. 



ll I I I 



3 
4 
5 
6 



12 Ruthven in Baddenock. Head Quarters. 

4 Elian near Corryburgh. 

5 Ruthven in Stratherrick. 
4 Glen Banchor. 

4 Dalwhinny. 

4 Glen Feshe. 



10 Moving Patrolc. 
Total i 2 7 43 



I have Visited my out Posts, and have taken as exact a View and 
account of the Country as I could. The greatest Inconvenience the 
parties will have is on their patroles as the distances between each post 
is so very Considerable with the Badness of the Roads, that it will be 
very fatiguing for the Parties to meet and return to their Quarters the 
same day. I have appoint'd the places of meeting most convenient for 
each party, and at the passes and Glens, that is most probable, where the 
thieves Lurk, and drive their Cattle through. There is no difficulty for 
the Moving patroles to go round the district, for some months, as there is 
no considerable rivers in the way, but whenever the rainy season comes 
on, it will be impossible for the Ruthven of Stratherrick party to meet 
with any of the other posts, as the Hills are so very High and steep, that 
none can travel and at the same time I am inform'd by the Gentlemen in 
the Country that the party there can be of no manner of service to the 
Country for preventing thieving, being so Low down the Country, it is 
there opinion it would do much better in the Head of Stratherick and 
guard one of the great passes from Glengaries Country, but by what I 
can understand the party would be but badly off in regard to Quarters. 






HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 539 

The distance of Miles from each post is as follows : 

Ruthven of Baddenock to Elian . . .13 miles. 

Elian to Ruthven in Stratherrick . . .12,, 

Stratherrick to Glen Banchor . . .15,, 

Glen Banchor to Dalwhinny . . . . 9 

Dalwhinny to Glen Feshe . . . . 12 
Glen Feshee to Ruthven in Baddenock . 4 

Total 65 

The out parties as yet are not very well accommodated with provision, 
or other necessaries but the people of the Country have promis'd to assist 
them. I have heard of no Cattle being stole since I came here the 
Country people pay great Obedience to the Laws against wearing the 
Highland Dress. I have done all I could to find out if there is any 
attainted or outlaw'd persons lurking in this corner but can hear of none. 

(Sign'd) ALEXR. CUMINE. 

qlk Captain's Command. 

Capt. Patton of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, i Subaltern. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. June 15, 1750. 

21 of May left Inverness March'd to Dalnachardoch from whence I 
detach'd a party for the Bridge of Kinnachan, which is ten measur'd and 
only 6 Computed Miles, as we came to Laudakin 5 miles from Dal- 
nachardoch, I found a Spanish piece in the House of Duncan Stewart, 
who made his escape to the Mountains, and some Ball we also found, 
And finding no such place as Stameshaden in Rannoch, I left the party 
at Indeshadden, foot of Loch Rannoch, it being a remarkable pass. The 
Loch is seven miles Long, and we have got a few empty Hutts to live in, 
no living soul within two or three miles of the Place, all the Inhabitants 
having gone to their Shelling, S r . Rob 1 . Menzies, Order'd a guide to meet 
us at the Head of Loch Gerry, and conducted us here, and sent two 
Horse Loads of Meal which was of great service as this Country affords 
none. The parties for Derrybeg, Glenco, and head of Loch Leven, I 
detach'd to their several Stations. 



540 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

3 June. Six Highlanders Dress'd in kilted Plaids and Philebegs &c. 
Compleatly Arm'd, with fire lock, sword and pistol each, Broke into a 
sheiling belonging to M' s . Allan Stewart proprietor of Indeshadden and 
Carried with them all the Cheese, Butter &c. they could find, the party 
were Immediately Call'd for and were all that night in quest of them and 
next day as I went my rounds, I heard they had been seen in the wood 
of Kinnachan, which I search'd well over, but got no further tiding of 
them. But as it was everybodys opinion, they had fallen down upon 
Stratheasle or the Braes of Mar in Order to steal Cattle, I made the 
following disposition in order to intercept them, by advice of M' s . Stewart 
I order'd, the party at Inderchadden to guard the pass of Belanasiobe, 
which cutt of their Communication that way with Glen Lion, and the 
Head of Rannoch their usual Route, and as I apprehend they would 
not presume to drive their prey over the Bridge of Kannachan, I order'd 
that party to Guard the pass on ye North Side of the Challin call'd Lead 
Nabraylay North of Lochan Dimalag, and a Mile south of the River 
Tumble, these two passes effectually Commands between the Tay and 
Tumble, as no Number of Cattle can travel any other Road. I have 
order'd the party at Dalnachadoch to patrole often to the pass of 
Dalspidal Nine Miles across the Mountains, And sent to Dalwhinny that 
the party there might guard the pass at the Head of Loch Eroch which 
is only a Mile from them, which Loch is 12 Miles Long and reaches 
within 3 Miles of Loch Rannoch. But least they should escape our 
Vigilance by travelling with their Cattle on the South side of the Challin 
(or maiden Pape) by the advice of S r . Robt. Menzie I sent four men to 
Guard the Head of Glen Lion, which is a very remarkable pass to and 
from the Isle of Skey, so that I think it's impossible they should escape 
with any number of Cows. 

The parties at Dalnachardoch are but Indifferently off, I hope at 
Kinnachar Bridge, somewhat better, M's. Allan Stewart, supplys the men 
at Inderhadden with whatever they want, and looks upon I hope small 
parties as Blessings to the Country. The parties at Glen lion and 
Derrybeg pretty well off, M r . Arch d . Campbell Late an Officer in Lord 
Loudon's Reg mt . supplies the Latter with all necessaries as does Angus 
Cameron the party at the Head of Loch Leven. 

The party at Glenco are worse off than any in my district, through 
the influence of McDonald, prisoner in Edin: Castle, we found a Lock 
with the Tower Mark, and a Bullet Mould in an empty house in Slis Mine. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 541 

Distribution of the Troops under my Command. 



3S< CJ 
I I 
-> 



3 
4 

5 



8 Invercomry south side Loch Rannoch. H. 

5 Head of Loch Leven. [Quarters. 

5 Head of Glenco. 

4 Derry Begg. 

4 Bridge of Kinnachan. 



6 i ,,6 Dalnacardock. 

7 I 4 Inderchadden. 

8 4 Head of Glen Lion. 
I 2 121 Moving Patrole. 

Total i i 4 7 61 



I visited all the Posts within my District. Number of Miles as 
follows. Viz 1 . 

Miles. 

From Invercomery, by Slis Mine and Laudakin to Dalnacardock 17 
From Dalnacardock across the Bridge of Innesour to the Bridge 

of Kinnachan ......... 6 

From Kinnachan through do. wood along the River Tumble to 

Inderchadden ......... 4 

From Inderchadden by Gary in Slis Garrow to Glen Lion head 16 
From Glen Lion head by Golaviran to Derry Begg S 

From Derry Begg by Loch Ball and Glen Esky to Glenco head 9 
From Glenco head across the Ferry on Loch Leven and up to 

the head of the Lochs 8 

From Loch Leven head by Loch Erach across the Tickeka 

Doughe which divides Perth Argle and Inverness shire to 

Invercomery 18 

Total Computed Miles . . .86 
(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 



542 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 



5th Captain's Command, 

Capt. Ball of Col. Bockland's Reg"" 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Barrack of Inversnade. 

Report June 4, 1750. 

In Obedience to your Commands, I have visited the Posts of Glen- 
falloch, Stonaklaker, Ackray, and the Bridge of Turk, where I found 
everything quiet and no complaint The soldiers at Glenfalloch board 
and [lodging ?] to their satisfaction. At Stonaklaker they provide 
for themselves, as they do at Ackray, and have everything the Country 
affords at a reasonable price. At the Bridge of Turk they arc Quarter'd 
on the Inhabitants and provide themselves where there is greater Plenty 
than in the other Places. The stubborn people in my neighbourhood 
hold up their provisions at a High price, though I am inform'd the Duke 
of Athole whose tenants they are has order'd the contrary. 

The distance from Glenfalloch to this is seven Miles, five of them up 
the side of Loch Loman, two up the River Glenfalloch, a foot road only, 
and a good deal of it vastly bad. 

From Glenfalloch to Ackray is fourteen Miles, there is a pass at Glen 
Gyle, a foot road goes up the north side of Loch Katharine. 

From Ackray to the Bridge of Turk two Miles open Country, no 
Glen nor Pass. 

From Bridge of Turk to Stonaklaker three Miles, no Glen nor pass. 

From Stonaklaker to Ackray ten Miles foot road up the side of 
Loch Katharine, almost Impassable. 

The Patroles go as Order'd, and have met with no Plaids or Arms. 

The Rain comes in at the Gavel end of Inversnade Barrack, and will 
damage the timber soon. 

(Sign'd) THOS. BALL. 

6tli Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg nit . 
Under His Command, i Sub. 
Station. Brae Mar Barrack. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 543 

Report. June 3 d , 1750. 

I set out on Monday and patroled to Rebellachlagan which is about 
Six Miles from hence, at the head of The River Gairn, I only cross'd 
one Glen, which is Call'd Fander, till I came to the River which I was 
oblig'd ford to come to the place where the party stays which is a Barn 
belonging to the Laird of Invercald, the Men are pretty well accomodated 
as to Lodging and firing, but at present they Can get little or Nothing 
but Meal in the Country, as the Mutton will not be in season this Month, 
from thence I march'd towards Inchrory, about four Miles from that. 
The next day I went to Dubrach, about six Miles from the Castle, I 
found it very good Road, it lies at or Near the Head of the River Dee, 
which I was obliged to pass, and understand that after a Large fall of 
Rain, its Difficult fording it, its one Continued Glen from the Castle, 
Call'd from the River Glendee, The Men are in a Barn, and are pretty 
well accomodated having plenty of Blanketts, from the County people 
besides those they Carried from home. I went from thence towards 
Rebellachlagan, to the River Quech, which place I am inform'd is not 
fordable after Much Rain, there I order'd the two patroles to meet. I 
passed a small place call'd Enernaneshah and the Glens of Altefugle, 
and Gloshaltmore, found it pretty good Marching for the Men but quite 
Barren. 

On Wednesday I set out for the Spittle of Glenshee in Order to 
make the tour the other way, we march'd along the Made road through 
Glen Cluny to Glen bogg, so to the spittle there, there the party is some- 
thing better off as they are Billeted, but are Much in the same situation 
as to provision, but they get some Meal, Milk and eggs, and would fare 
much better, if the Inhabitants were not up in their Shelings, some five 
or Six Miles amongst the Hills. I patroled from thence to Alternour 
about half way to Dubrach, where I order'd those parties to meet, but its 
a most Dismal Country as I ever saw being full of boggs, and Cross'd 
some very High Mountains. I went through Glen Patney towards Loch 
Nanain, and Came to Dubrach, but the four last Miles being all over 
Mountains, I saw Nothing worth Mentioning. 

I find the Country at present very Quiet, and by what I can learn in 
no great apprehension of Thieves. I meet with none in the Highland 
Dress, nor with Arms, I find Invercald and one Capt. Forbes to be 
extremely Civil, by doing everything thats in their power, to accomodate, 
the troops in this District, in the best Manner that is possible. 



544 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 



The Men in this Castle arc extremely well Lodged were it not for the 
Rooms smoking, which is most terrible, we have no provision except 
Meal, but what we send to Aberdeen or Dunde for. I have taken Care 
to fix up Orders at all the Kirks within the District. 



:12 a. 



.0 
3 
01 



Cfi 






I 

2 

3 
4 



i i 2 2 36 Braemar Barrack. Head Quarters. 

,,,,15 Rebellachlagan. 

i i 10 Dubrach. 

i 6 Spittle of Glen Shee. 

2 12 Moving Patrole. 

i i 6 4 69 Total. 



Note. Glen Clova : a Corp 1 , and 3 Men. Ditto Glen Muick occupied 
by, the party of Lord Barry's Reg mt . sent into the Braes of Angus. 



Jtk Subaltern's Command, 

Ensign Rutherford of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg 1 . 
Station. Cargarff Barracks. 
Report. June 4th, 1750. 

Out Posts. 



Inchrory . 

Braes of Abcrncthy . 

Moving patrole . 

Remaining in the Barracks 
With me 



Total 2 3 40 



Serjt. 


Cop]. 


Men. 


I 


i> 


8 


i 


I 


5 


11 


I 


6 


i 


2 


19 


i 


I 


21 



NOTE. 

Tomatoul ami Achnachoil, 
Dunans, Scalen and Ach- 
nacra & Cabrach, occupied 
by a party of Genl. Pul- 
leney's Regmt. from Stra- 
bogie. 



The partys at Inchrory, and the Braes of Abernethy, arc Quarter'd 
tolerably well in Country Hutts, are supply'd with Oat Meal from the 
Country, the Country people supply them also with other provisions, 
which Consists of Mutton Milk and Eggs at Reasonable Rates, but they 
have no firing except what they gather from the Hills. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 545 

Glens and Communications betwixt the several Outposts. 

From Corgarff to Inchrory up the River Don is three Miles the 
Country is thinly Inhabited. The source of this River is form'd by the 
Joining of the Rivellets Fevaid, Miervarich, and some others from the 
Mountains, from thence to Inchrory the ground is Mossy, and scarce 
passable, and the Mountains High on each side ; Inchrory is situated 
near the River Awn. From Corgarff to the Braes of Abernethy is 
fourteen Miles. After crossing the River don, about half a Mile below 
Corgarff, the road passes through a Village call'd Miln Town of Allairg, 
afterwards over a Hill call'd Allairg, it afterwards rises over a High 
Mountain call'd Lecht, falls down and crosses the Burn of Lecht, goes 
down the side of a Burn call'd Canglas about two Miles, and after 
crossing the ford of Carnagoval on the River Awn (where there is a pass 
call'd the pass of Carnagoval, near which at a place call'd Kamdillvaih old 
Glen Buckett's house stood,) it passes through a little wood, and enters 
on Glen Brown. After passing through this Glen, there is a Burn of the 
same name (where there is a pass call'd the pass of Glen Brown) after 
crossing which Burn, the road Rises over a High Mountain called 
Krastrekay, and from this to the Braes of Abernethy, the Country is very 
thinly Inhabited. The Braes of Abernethy are Situated near a Burn 
called Nethy. The Glen call'd Glen More is also near it, it is surrounded 
by High Mountains on every side, and the river Spey is about two Miles 
distant. From the Braes of Abernethy is seven Miles, the road over 
Mountains in many places Mossy, Rocky and scarce passable, about four 
Miles from Abernethy it crosses the Burn of Ainach, where there is a 
pass call'd the pass of Ainach, no Inhabitants nearer than at a Village 
call'd Gianlich about a Mile farther on the road, it afterwards passes thro' 
part of Glen Awn, crosses the River Awn, where there is a pass call'd 
Altananerock, and from thence to Inchrory, the road lys in a Valley, 
High Hills on each side of it, there is another pass call'd, Elinquish, 
which is also near Inchrory, on the same River. 

A Report of the Moving Patrol from ike Barracks of Corgarff. 

At four o'clock in the morning march'd up the River Don and cross'd 
near the Head of it, about two Miles further they came to a Village 
call'd Torbau, and patroled over a large moor, and after crossing the 

U 2 



546 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

River Awn where the road is very bad, they patroled over a High Hill 
to abernethy, the Country through which they pass'd is very thinly 
inhabited. From the Braes of Abernethy they patroled to inchrory, the 
road betwixt these two places very bad, &c. This report near the same 
as above, as is the patrole from Inchrory, as is that of the Braes of 
Abernethy. 

On the 27 of last month application being made by a Justice of 
peace, for a Serjt. and twelve men from the Barracks, to apprehend some 
persons who had been guilty of a riot in attacking and abusing a 
gentleman in His own house, the party march'd accordingly, but the 
Rioters having intelligence of their coming, made their escape, they were 
pursued by the party, but could not be apprehended notwithstanding the 
party used their utmost endeavours for that purpose, they are all 
Inhabitants near the same place, so that it's expected they may be 
afterwards apprehended all but one who is a stranger and made His 
escape before the party was apply'd for. 

(Sign'd) Ro: RUTHERFORD. 

Report of Lieut. Ogilvy from Tomantoul of Genl. Ptilteney's Reg lt . 
Detach'd from StratJibogie June 75, 7750. 

May 25th. March'd from Strathbogie to the Kirk Mortlick, Cross'd 
the River Devoron, 2 Miles from Strathbogie, by Aswanley, by Eden- 
glassie, by Achendown Castle, thro' the Head of Glen Fiteeh to the Kirk 
of Mortlich 10 Miles. The 2 C. march'd by Achmoor in Glen Renis, 
cross'd the Water Levitt, a little above Blairfinee, over the Com out of 
the Head of Glen Levitt to Tomantoul in Strathavin 1 1 Miles. 

Disposition of the Troops under the Command of Lieut. Ogilvy. 

d o "2 '5T o u 
fcfi -?. j U ~, 

1 i i 1 1 Tomantoul. Head Quarters. 

2 i 4 Achnahyle. 

3 i 5 Downan. 

4 i ,,6 Shelan and Achnascra. 

5 i 4 Cabrach. 



i 2 3 30 Total. 






HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 547 

Tomantoul is situated 6 Miles from the Castle of Corgarff up the 
River Awn near the ford call'd Garnagoul, formerly a noted pass for 
driving of stolen Cattle, from Tomantoul to Achnahyle up the River 
Awn 2 Miles, from thence to Achnascra and Shelan 5 Miles, over a Moor, 
crossing the water of Conliss from Achnascra to Tornachalt in the 
Cabroch by the Sewea over the Stepler (a large Mountain) to Blackwater 
to Tornachalt 5 Miles, from thence to Downan in Glen Levitt by a Town 
call'd Crafthead, to Glen Fidich, to Achmoor in Glen Renis to Tombrachie 
in Glen Levitt to Downan and Miles from Downan to the Head Quarters 
by the Seal by the River Awn to Kirk Michael on Do. then cross the 
water of Conliss at Rayven to Camdelmoor to Tomantoul 5 Miles. 

All the parties of the different posts Quarter'd on the farmers but 
oblig'd to Lie in Barns, and furnish'd by the Inhabitants with Blanketts. 

There is plenty of provision, and the Soldiers of the Different parties 
are well acquainted with the whole Country. 

I can hear of no Body wearing the Highland Dress, none as I can 
find carry Arms, without hav<ng a proper Authority, and there has been 
no Cattle stolen from this, these four years past. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 

Sent to Col. Napier June 23rd, 1750. 



RETORTS OF THE CAPTAINS AND OFMCERS ON THE HIGHLAND 

POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Swettenham of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg of Glen Lcogh. 

Report. June 26, 1750. Glen Leogh. 

Since my last of the I2th Inst. I have received the following Reports 
from the posts in my district. 

June 21. 

Lieut. Maxwell commanding the party at Tray in South Morrer 
acquaints me that all our people in his district have been very Dilligcnt 
and regularly went their Patroles, but found nothing extraordinary, 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Mr. Maxwell took a Patrole himself thro' greatest part of the Bounds 
prescribed him, and found nothing worth observation, only saw at a 
distance two men in Highland Dress nigh the house of one Allister 
McDonald at the Head of Loch Nowa, whom he pursued but could not 
apprehend as they got into a wood, he is inform'd one of the offenders is 
son to the above Allister McDonald. 

June 23. 

Ensign Cay writes from Strontian, that some days since the Laird of 
Kingerloch sent to him that he had lost five Cows more, but as he had 
heard no Tidings of them, and no Track having been rais'd he could not 
pretend to send any men in quest of them, that all is well in his district, 
and all Orders have been comply'd with. 

June 22. 

Ensign Patton's report from Glen Finnan. All is well and the men 
under his Command having gone the regular Patroles as directed. 

Ensign Irving who Commands the moving Patrole return'd to Glen 
Lcogh on the 23d Inst, having visited all the posts in my district, and 
made his report that all was well, having observ'd nothing worth troubling 
yuu with the detail of. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENHAM. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Captain Molesworth of Genl. Guise's Reg" 1 '. 

Under his Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Laggan Ach = Adrom. 

Report June 21. 

Nothing extraordinary has happened within my command since my 
last report, the patroling officer is Return'd, and has given me a list of 
Persons carrying Arms under the protection, who reside chiefly about 
Glen Sheil and the Lands belonging to Lord Fortrose, there are ten 
protections signed by him, three by Colin Mackenzie his factor, six S r . 
Alex. McKenzie of Coul, two by Norman McLoed, Esq r ., two by John 
McKenzie of Applecross, and one by Alex. McKenzie of Fairbour, in all 
twenty four in the district of Glen Sheil and places adjacent belonging to 
Kintail, these are said by Lord Fortrose's Bailiff (Call'd the Ground 
Officer) to be the only persons allow'd to carry Arms within that district. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 



549 



I thought it Convenient to send the whole moving Patrole with the 
officer for the first round that they might all know the Disposition of the 
posts and have some acquaintance with the Country, for the future I 
believe it will be sufficient, considering the scarcity of provisions and 
accomodation for Soldiers on a March, to keep about six of them 
constantly moving, and to relieve them from the Head Quarters from 
time to time, if this Method should not appear sufficient, I shall increase 
their number, but at present the Thieves seem sufficiently awed and the 
Highland dress is no where to be seen. The following is the extract of 
the patroling officer report. 



June 6th. 

7- 

8. 
Do. 

9- 
9-10. 

u. 



Places Visited. 
( Station between 
\Loch Garry & quich. 

Glensheils. 

Stratcluny. 

Head of Glen Morison 

Knockfinn. 

Fort Aug st . Stat". 
fGarvimore. 
\Garvibeg. 

Glenspean. 

Leach Roy. 

Nine Mile Bridge. 

High Bridge. 



Miles. 


Rivers past. 


Glens past. 


12. 


Garry. 


Glengary. 


1 6. 


Shiel. 


jGlenquich. 
\Glenshiel. 


9- 


Cluny. 


Strath Cluny. 


. 6. 


Morison. 


Glenmorrison. 


8. 


Glas. 


Strathglas. 


12. 


Oich, 





II. 



Spey. 



Glen Drummond. 



12. Glenspean. 8. Spean. 

Do. Leach Roy. 8. ? & Roy. Glen Roy. 

Do. Nine Mile Bridge. 9. Glene. Glen Glene. 

Do. High Bridge. 3. Spean. Glen Lockey. 

Patroles from all the stations regularly made and chang'd as order'd. 
No Complaints from the Country people, no motions of thieves, no 

extraordinaries. 

(Sign'd) CHARLES GREY, Ensign. 

July 3- 

I have nothing extraordinary to acquaint you with since my last 
report but that my party at Strathglas has apprehended and sent to 
Inverness goal Hugh McDonell, servant to Mr. Chisholm, Minister of 
Strathglas, for wearing the Plaid and Phillibeg, and he is confin'd by the 
Sheriff for six months, pursuant to act of Parliament. The party at 
Laggan has this day, upon a petition to me, taken up Margaret McKenzie, 
a notorious Thief, for housebreaking, and I have deliver'd her into Fort 



550 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Augustus, from whence she goes to-morrow under a guard to Inverness. 
I have procur'd Intelligence of twenty one noted Thieves, with their 
additions and places of residence, and have sent notice of them with such 
helps as I could give to the officers commanding in the several districts, 
where they reside, as there is an account of six men in Highland Dress 
and compleatly arm'd, being pursued from Rannoch by Capt. Patton, I 
have thought proper to reinforce the party at Nine Mile Bridge with a 
man from the moving patrole to make them equal in number to the 
thieves should they attempt to escape by that pass. The moving patrole 
has been scouring the Mountains, particularly from the Spey to Strath 
Erich, in hopes to meet with them, but found everything Quiet. I have 
this day Intelligence of three Cows stolen from Castle Grant, but shall 
take Care that they shall not pass my District with impunity, and for 
that purpose to scoure the Glens to-morrow. 

(Sign'd) J. MoLESWORTH. 

jrd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Station. Rathven in Baddenoch. Head Quarters. 

Report. June 16. 

Since my last report I have taken up the two following men, for 
wearing the Philibeg, and have sent them to Inverness gaol, Viz'., Grigor 
McPherson and Norman McLeod, the first was taken up by the party at 
Glen Banchor, he was born in that place aged about 17 years, the other 
was taken up by the moving patrole in Rathven in Strath Erich, he was 
born near that place, aged 18 years ; there has nothing else extraordinary 
has happen'd in my Command since my coming here. I had a report 
made me ten or twelve days ago of 4 or 5 men being seen in arms by a 
Country man at Strausvoilie, 5 miles above Glen Fechry the Braemar 
road, immediately I sent a party in search of them for some days, but 
could not get the least intelligence, which road they went, it is Generally 
believed, they have gone down to the low Country so I am hopefull we 
shall give a good account of them, in their return, as I have order'd all 
the parties to be very diligent and keep a sharp lookout. 

July 14. 

My moving patrole has this day return'd from patroling this week 
past, and reports that all the Country is quiet and no thieving or any 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 551 

Intelligence of thieves, the rain we have had for these some days has 
made the Hills very bad travelling and all the little Rivolets so big that 
it made passing of them very difficult. There is nothing extraordinary 
has happen'd since my Last. 

(Sign'd) ALEX. CUMINE. 



^th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Patton of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, I Subaltern. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. July 3. 

Nothing remarkable has occur'd since my last return, the thieves 
having never since been heard of, by which it is believed, that our quick 
pursuit together with the Disposition made to intercept their return made 
them lose hopes of getting back in safety, with any number of Cattle, 
and that therefore they dispersed themselves generally over the Mountains 
to their respective habitations. 

The 1 5th June gave a pile of men to the Sheriff's officer who arrested 
2 Cows for debt and escorted them towards Perth. 

The party at Glen Lion in their first patrole saw a man in Highland 
Dress who they endeavour'd to apprehend, but made his escape although 
fir'd at, he was the first person who appeared in that Garb, in my district, 
since our arrival in Rannoch. 

As the people in this Country are reported, the greatest thieves in 
Scotland, and were all in the Late Rebellion except a very few, I made 
no Doubt but they have great numbers of Arms, but they will take care 
to keep them Conceal'd from us. Lieut. Foster in going his patrole saw 
three firelocks and two Broadswords at Barrivoue, protected by Lord 
Broadalbin's Factor, Mr. Campbell, without either mentioning their 
number or Quality. I saw three pieces in the house of Captain 
Robertson at Can, as this Gentleman is in the Dutch service, I will 
gladly know if I ought to seize them or not. 

June 22. 

The party at Dalnacaroch accidentaly found a Regimental sword hid 
under a heap of Rubbish. McPherson who keeps the publick house 
there applied to Commissary Bissat, late factor to the Duke of Athol, 



552 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1/49-50. 

that the men might be turn'd out of his Barn, where I had fixed them, or 
be Billeted on other houses, and I send you an Extract of his letter, that 
you may know in what Light they look upon those Parties, Viz 1 ., " I have 
"advis'd with the Justices at the Quarter Sessions and it is their opinion 
" that the Soldiers should buy their own fire and pay for their Bedding &c. 
" about the time of the Rebelion, and till all was settled they were oblig'd 
" to Quarter them because they would not stand with them, but now all 
" is settled they must provide everything at their own expence, I have 
" therefore order'd their own house at the Bridge to be repaired for them 
" that their being there may keep them from troubling the Country for 
" the future." This house was built at the same time with the Bridge 
upon the Garry at Dallenveigh 300 yards from Dalnachardoch, and 
Commands both that and the road from Crief. I have therefore Order'cl 
the party to Comply with the above order of the Justice so soon as the 
House shall be put in proper repair. 

(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 

jt/i Captain's Command. 

Capt. Ball of Col. Bocklancl's Reg" 1 '. 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Invcrsnade Barrack. 

Report. June 23. 

In Lieut. Evors report to me of the I5th Instant he says some thieves 
near the Bridge of Turk had broke upon some houses, that he gave 
assistance in order to apprehend them, but to no effect, all is well in the 
other outposts. 

July 8. 

In Lieut. Evors report from the Bridge of Turk says his men on their 
patrole saw, a man in a plaid, which they pursued ; he dropped the plaid 
and got off, all's well in the other outposts. 

(Sign'd) THO. BALL. 

6th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Genl. Pultency's Reg mt . 
Under his Command, i Sub. 
Station. Braemar Barrack. 






HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 553 

Report. June 19. 

Yesterday the patroling party returned but mett nothing extraordinary, 
by all the accounts I can learn they seem to agree that Serjt. More Alia 
Doe, who was Last year at the Head of a Thieving party is certainly 
gone over to Holland. 
June 30. 

My party's have patroled from hence and all the outposts Join'd at 
the places allotted them but mett with nothing extraordinary. The 
following is a List of the Military Stores Lodg'd in Braemar Castle 
June 27, 1750, Viz 1 . 

Wall Pieces swivelled 12. 

Flints for Do 80. 

Match 1 8 pounds. 

Com'd powder 2 Half Barrells. 

Hand Grenades 50. 

Wall piece Shot 1,200. 

(Sign'd) SAMUEL EDHOUSK. 



7th Subaltern's Command. 

Ensign Rutherford, Ensign in Genl. Pulteney's Reg mt . 

Station. Corgarf Barrack. 

Report. June 10. 

I have reports from all the patroles, that they found nothing extra- 
ordinary, the men in this Garrison are supply'd with provision and 
everything else. 

July 2. 

The patroles report nothing extraordinary. On the 28 of June a 
party from the Barracks march'd and apprehended two of the persons 
Concerned in the Riot mentioned in the report of the 4 June, and a 
Warrant having been obtained from a Justice of peace they were escorted 
by said party to Aberdeen Jayl there to remain till they stand their 
Tryal, there is But one more of the Rioters who has flead the Country. 

(Sign'd) Ro. RUTHERFORD. 
v 2 



554 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Report of Lieut. Ogilvy from Tomantoul of Genl. Pulteneys Reg"' 1 , 
detached from Strathbogie nothing extraordinary. 

Capt. Sharp of Lord Burys Reg mt . in the Braes of Angus, Reports 
June 21. 

That Mr. Wetherburn on his Issuing out a special Warrant to Alex. 
Gib Constable, for breaking open a House in Lintrathen parish, for 
apprehending the Body of Isabel Douglas suppos'd to have murthered 
her Bastard Child wherein she had secreted her self and refused 
admittance to the Constable upon his first Warrant for apprehending 
her, was apprehensive they would insult the Constable in the execution 
of his duty, therefore at his representation I sent on the 7th Inst. a party 
of four men to protect the Constable from any Insult that might be 
offered, which party return'd the same evening, having executed their 
Orders without the least Disturbance. 

(Sign'd) HORO. SHARPE. 

Omitted in Capt. Edhouse report but put in, in the General report 
sent to H.R.H. July 25. Yesterday the officer with me took up a 
person wearing part of the Highland dress, he had on a short Tartan 
Coat with shoulder straps, I sent him to Capt. Forbes, a Justice of peace, 
who committed him to goal. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid-d-cam. 

Edin: July 24, 1750. Sent to Col. Napier July 26, 1750. 



REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS AND OFFICERS ON THE HIGHLAND 

POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Swettenham of Genl. Guises's Reg mt . 
Under His Command, 4 Sub. 
Station. Head of Loch Arkeg or Glen Lioigh. 
Report. July 17, 1750. 

Ensign Cay Commanding at Strontian Reports to me that a party 
was demanded, from him by one Ronald McDonald, who is tacksman to 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 555 

Glenallidill, to go in pursuit of three Cows stolen from him, the party 
was accordingly sent, who found two of the Cows in a fold on the Lands 
of Kingerloch, in the Shire of Argyle, with some more cows belonging 
to the undernamed Men, who are sent prisoners to the Sheriff of the 
above Shire, at Inverary. Donald McAchran, Angus Donald, Hector 
and John McLean, with John McLean Jun r ., nothing extraordinary from 
any other detachment. 

August 12. 

I have procur'd a list of Thieves within my district. I order'd the 
moving patrole under the Command of ensign Irvine from Glen Lioigh 
to secure the Mountains to the Head of Loch Arkeg and Glen Desery. 
Ensign Irvine return'd with his posts the 2d Inst. with two prisoners 
which two Thieves, Miles Macmillan taken in Glen Desery and John 
M c phie taken at the Head of Loch Arkeg, I have sent to Inverness, with 
Alex. McDonald and Donald McDonald to prosecute them for Sixty 
Goats stolen in the year 1748. The above prisoners were committed to 
the Goal of Inverness by the Sheriff and the party returned to Glen 
Lioigh on the 8th Inst. Nothing extraordinary has happen'd since last 
report. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENHAM. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Molesworth of Genl. Guise's Reg nit . 

Under His Command, 2 Sub. 

Station. Laggan Ach = Adrom. 

Report. Laggan, July 18, 1750. 

The 8th an officer was order'd with a Serjt. and 8 men to lye at Nine 
Mile Bridge under pretence of going to Fort William, but to march at 
one in the morning over to Glen Roy, and to search every house on the 
North side, and a Serjt. from Laggan with 8 men enter the Glen to y e 
eastward, and search it on the South side as also Glen Keppoch, one of 
the Thieves call'd McCawer was surpriz'd but fled for it and notwithstanding 
the Party fir'd sixteen shots after him, he made his escape, throwing him- 
self down a precipice and swimming a river. 

Having got intelligence of five Thieves harbouring in Glenmoriston I 
sent their designations to the Officer there with Orders to attempt y e 



556 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

taking them and he took his measures very properly, for that purpose 
but found his design betray'd, and the Thieves fled, being chagrined 
at this disappointment, I apply'd to a Gentleman residing near 50 Miles 
from hence and who had appear'd Zealous in the promoting our 
endeavours, my request was that he should send me some trusty person, 
one who had suffer'd by these Villaons and knew how to trace them, 
but his answer gave me but little hopes of succeeding, in such kind of 
pursuits from the account it gave me of the fear with which the Thieves 
had impress'd on the Country people. His words are : " This is a good 
" intention yet all the Honest men in this Neighbourhood are in such 
" dread of the villainous attempts of those Ravenous creatures, that none 
" of them will undertake to be guides, fearing the bad consequences, and 
" not without Cause in case the affair may not succeed." 

I subjoin my answer to this letter, as I think it very material for this 
service that we should acquire the Confidence of these people, and as I 
hope you will direct me to do whatever I have omitted, that might 
conduce to that end. 

To Mr. Mathieson of Farnaig. 

S r . I have your letter of the 2nd of July before me being trans- 
mitted to me by Lieut. Desvories from Glen moriston and am extremely 
concerned to find that such a Dread should prevail amongst the Honest 
men you mention, that they dare not pursue that Course which is indeed 
the only effectual means of delivering them both from the terror and the 
oppression of the Villains of the Country, it cannot be expected that the 
King's Troops should be able to find the lurking places of the Thieves 
without Guides or that they should know their persons so as to secure 
them when they chance to fall into their Hands, it is therefore the 
common Cause of all the Honest Inhabitants of the Country, to assist 
us with Courage, in discovering these Enemies of Mankind, and not 
through a slugish Timidity, to render vain His Majesty's generous 
endeavours for the tranquility of his subjects in these parts, as the steps 
vv h have been taken by the Government, in the Disposition of the Troops 
here, ought to Convince every one that the welfare of the Highlands is 
an object of the tenderest regard to it, I think it incumbent on those for 
whose protection we are sent to concur with us by all possible means to 
render this service effectual. I hope you will place this duty in such a 
light to those over whom you have influence, as may induce them boldly 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 557 

to pursue all measures which may tend to eradicate the thieves who 
could not thus have rendered themselves formidable to a whole Country 
but through the indolence or pusillanimity, of those whose Duty to them- 
selves, as well as their Country, call upon them to exert their utmost 
activity against them, it is because I have observed in your behaviour 
an uncommon Zeal for promoting the good ends for which I am sent here 
that I express myself to you so freely, assuring you at the same time (as 
I desire you to assure your neighbours) that no pains or diligence shall 
be wanting on my part for securing speedily and effectually such thieves 
as they shall point to me, so as they may have no leasure to wreak their 
vengeance on such as assist in discovering them. I desire you to assure 
them likewise, that I will faithfully conceal the names of such persons as 
shall discover, and enable me to trace them, that if their service proves 
effectual I will defray their travelling charges, that I would be at all times 
ready to grant them protection or to march to their assistance if needfull; 
and that lastly I will upon my departure from this place, use my 
endeavours to procure for such as have been active, in the discovery of 
Robbers Licences to keep arms, that they may be in no fear of the 
Vengeance of the Thieves, even after His Majesty's Troops shall have 
quitted the Country. 

I have communicated to Capt. Swettenham commanding at Glen 
Lioigh the names of sixteen persons in and about the district of Loch 
Arkeg, these names are all in your List and if you will send to him some 
persons who can assist him in tracing them I dare assure you, he will be 
ready to Grant the same protection and encouragement to your people as 
I have promised on my part. 

I must desire you not to communicate intelligence to the Serjt. in 
your Neighbourhood, unless it be such as requires his immediate assistance 
in which case he has orders to assist you on demand, in other cases you 
will be so good to deliver him your letter seal'd and directed to Capt. 
Molesworth Laggan Achadrom to be forwarded immediately. 

Your paragraph relating to Superiors of Lands is of too high a 
nature for me to examine into the merits of it, I can therefore only 
assure you that in making my reports, I shall transcribe it word for word, 
I promise myself that from your Zeal, your prudence and activity I shall 
receive great assistance in the discharge of my Command here. As for 
me you shall always find me from Inclination as well as Duty ready to 
serve and protect you. I am &c. 



558 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-$O. 

The paragraph above Hinted at in Mr. Mathieson's letter is as follows: 
" I will not pretend to prescribe rules, but I think the Superiors, of whom 
" they hold possession of Lands, and pay rent at other Honest Men's 
" expence, ought to be the persons oblig'd by Law and Equity to secure 
" those abandon'd wretches, for sure I am their troubled Consciences led 
" them to the Hills how soon they heard of your coming to that Country, 
" and will continue there till your Removal, so that I fear this good design 
" will be fruitless." 

I hope the promise which I have ventured to make to encourage this 
Gentleman may have your sanction or at least approbation, for without 
some promises of that kind I believe little service can be done, I imagine 
that the Liberty of Bearing arms may be a tempting Bribe to those 
people. 

Report. July 22. 

.... As I am required by my Instructions to give you Immediate 
Notice, when anything extraordinary happens, within my Command, I 
send this by express to inform you, of a very daring Outrage Committed, 
to me by the people of this Country, and I shall do it by transcribing 
the examination of three soldiers, who had been at Laggan for pay, and 
provision, and were returning to their Command at the head of Glenshiel, 
I must premise to you, that the soldiers were all warn'd by me, to be 
cautious in giving their testimony, as they would probably be Call'd upon 
to swear to it, in a Court of Justice, which they all declare themselves 
ready to do. 

" John Moffat Soldier in Gen 1 . Guise's Regiment declares, and is ready 
" to make oath, that on Saturday the 21 of July at three in the afternoon, 
" he, with George Netherall, and John Salisbury, saw John Mcintosh and 
" another Man, driving a horse, that the said Mcintosh was in a tartan 
" Jacket and Tartan Philibeg, and that they pursued him, and he threw 
" of his Jacket, and Philibeg and hid himself in a wood, but they 
"discover'd him by means of his Dog, that as soon as he was taken he 
" demanded his Jacket and Philibeg and put them on. That they were 
" bringing him prisoner to Laggan and had brought him seven Miles, 
" that is to within two Mile of Invergary, that Many Women Came 
" about them, offering them Money to release their prisoner, and that the 
" prisoner himself offer'd them a Guinea, that the Women to the Number 
" of about twenty, accompanied them to a very thick wood, when on a 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 559 

" sudden six Men started out, in a narrow path, and immediately seized 
"their Arms, the Women at the same time Jumping some about their 
"Throats, others Grasping their Leggs, and thus assisted the Men in 
"throwing them to the Ground. That the Men took their firelocks from 
"them, and shook out the priming, and that the Men, and Women 
" together drew out their swords, and Bayonets, threatening to Murther 
" them instantly, if they did not take an Oath, which they tender'd them 
"on a Bayonet, never to attempt anything against the prisoner, whom 
" they set at Liberty, and then return'd the firelocks threatening likewise 
"to Murther them if they ever heard, that they went to Laggan to 
"Complain, or did not proceed Immediately to Achnagarth, the place of 
' their Command, he says further that the Highlanders beat them severely 
" when they were down, and Broke one of their Firelocks, also that they 
"took the Cartridge Straps with which the prisoner was bound, which 
" they would not return, on any account, he adds that the Laird of Lundy 
" must know two of the men concern'd, they lodging in the next sheiling 
"to him, and he being present when they run out and took the Hill, on 
" the coming up off the party detach'd from me." 

George Netheral and John Salisbury, Confirm every Circumstance of 
Moffat's deposition, and declare themselves ready to take their Oaths to 
the truth of it. 

These three men took a round about way and came to me at five in 
the morning, giving me an account of what had happen'd as I was not 
able to go myself and the patroling officer was out another way, I sent 
them back to the place with a Corpl. acting as Serjt. and fifteen men, and 
gave him the following order in writing. 

" You are to find out and bring home the men and women concern'd 
" in the Rescue of the Prisoner taken up by the men of Corpl. Elder's 
" Party, for wearing the Highland Dress, if you meet with resistance you 
" are not to fire, unless there is danger of your being overpower'd, but to 
" make use of the butt ends of your firelocks, or if that is not sufficient 
" of your Bayonetts, and you are to Publish and make it known, to the 
"Country People, that to Rescue a prisoner from the Hands of the 
"Troops is an act of Rebellion, and that I shall for the future treat as 
"Rebells, those who shall presume to attempt it." 

This party has retaken and sent in to me the Prisoner Mclntosh who 
had been rescued, they have also sent in Sanders McDonald, one of the 



560 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-5. 

most active in the Rescue, and four of the women who assisted at it. I 
sent likewise a smaller party to patrole through the woods, and as I have 
got the name and place of abode of three more of them, with a High- 
lander who can give evidence against them, it is probable I shall get 
some of them, the parties being still in pursuit. 

I shall send Mclntosh (the offender against the act of parliament) to 
Inverness to the Sheriff, as the Law directs ; but for the other prisoners, 
which I have taken, or made take, for being concerned in this kind of 
infant Rebellion, I do not choose to put them into the Hands of the Civil 
power till I shall know your orders, having no reason to be satisfied with 
the impartiality of the acting Sheriff of Inverness. I shall therefore 
request of Gen 1 . Collingwood, to keep them in fort Augustus, where they 
will be as military prisoners, till I am honoured with your Commands, 
and beg they may be accompanied with Directions for my future 
Conduct, in the Like Cases which will very probably often Occur, unles 
these people shall be deterr'd by a severe example made of the prisoner 
now taken. As Mr. Collingwood the Last time I sent him a Prisoner, 
started a difficulty, in relation to the maintaining those who might be 
sent him, I shall remove that in the present case, by taking it upon me, 
to pay for their support, tho' I think that need not be very chargeable 
considering the merits of the prisoners. 

I shall demand of Glengarie the persons of the offenders, whose 
names I have procured if my parties should not come up with them, tho' 
I shall do this rather to sound his Inclinations, and to fulfill a form, than 
upon account of any real expectation, I have of his delivering them. I 
shall also demand the assistance of the Laird of Lundie, above mentioned, 
in giving intelligence, and pointing out their habitation. I have gone as 
far or rather further than I think myself authoriz'd by my Instructions, 
in endeavouring to prevent such an Insult being offer'd to His Majesty's 
Troops for the future, By assembling all my parties and declaring to 
them, that whatever soldier should suffer his piece to be taken from him 
by any number of Highlanders, not having fire Arms, and had not first 
made use of the shot, that was in it, should be tryed by a General Court 
Martial for Cowardice 

August 2. 

On Saturday the 27 I made a March by Night from Laggan to the 
House of Fraser of Foyers, about two and twenty of this Country Miles, 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 561 

and surrounded the house about three in the morning, but he was 
in another place. We found his eldest son, who was indeed in the 
Rebellion but not excepted, I therefore dismissed him, but brought 
what Arms I found which was two firelocks, and a silver small sword 
without a scabbard. The sword appears to have belonged to an ensign 
of our Regiment named Paterson, who was taken at Fort Augustus and 
is since Dead. Foyers the son Claimed the Arms from me, telling me he 
was Qualified by Law to keep them, to which I answered that I should 
be ready whenever he made his Qualification appear, to restore the Arms 
to him, it having been hinted to me, that the Father was a very Insig- 
nificant Man and below the resentment of notice of the Government, 
I can't in Duty omitt acquainting you, that in the time of Rebellion, he 
appeared in quite a different light when he daily aw'd and threaten'd the 
Town of Inverness, before and some time after the arrival of Lord 
Loudon. That it was he who attack'd the Lord president Forbes, in his 
House at Culloden, and that it was to his Charge that the Officers and 
Soldiers taken at Fort Augustus were Committed, which accounts for the 
sword above mentioned being found in his house, so the Gentleman 
seems to have been Scandaliz'd by his Friends and misrepresented 
through favour. 

Notwithstanding the many professions of service made me by Glcn- 
garie, he has neither secur'd any of those men whom I demand'd nor 
helped me to the names of those who absconded, tho' he promised to 
discover them, which he must certainly have been able to do. 

(Sign'd) JA. MOLESWORTII. 



jrd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 

Station. Ruthven in Baddenoch. Head Quarters. 

Report. 

Nothing extraordinary, but that all the Country is very Quiet. 

(Sign'd) ALEX. CUMINE. 
w 2 



562 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

4-th Captain's Command. 

Captain Patton of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, one Subaltern. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. July 23. 

Nothing remarkable has occur'd since my Last, entire peace being 
establish'd quite through the District, and I believe we shall have but 
little to do, before September the usual season for stealing of Cattle. 
This Moment the party at Kinloch Leven have Brought me a Black 
belonging to Mr. Stewart of Appin, dressed in tartan Livery, turned up 
with yellow ; and to-morrow I send him to the nearest Justice of peace. 

Aug 1 . 14. 

Mr. Menzies of Culdain, proprietor of Glen Lion, having Cattle 
stolen from him some time ago, by one Cameron of Finnart, one of his 
servants with the assistance of a party of soldiers from hence, seiz'd and 
recover'd two Cows, and twenty sheep the 28th Ult. 

(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 

jf/t Captain's Command. 

Capt. Ball of Col. Bockland's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Subs. 

Station. Inversnade Barracks. 

Report. 

Nothing extraordinary since Last report. 

(Sign'd) Tuos. BALL. 

6th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Gen 1 . Pulteney's. 
Under his Command, i Sub. 
Station. Brae Marr Barrack. 
Report. July 21. 

I mentioned in my last my having sent to Aberdeen Goal one Donald 
Stewart, committed by Capt. Forbes for wearing part of the Highland 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 563 

Dress, the Goal keeper gave a receipt for him,- but immediately they 
Bail'd him out, and the man was at home before the party. My Serjt. 
took up likewise another man, in his way to Aberdeen and carried him 
before a Justice of peace who set him at liberty also, he had on a Tartan 
Coat with a waistcoat under it, in short the Justices in this Neighbourhood 
seem to pay little or no regard to the act of parliament except Capt. 
Forbes, therefore intend sending the next to perth. 

Aug 1 . 12. 

As we have had a Continued Rain since Last report my party could 
not patrole, I understand there is a great many arms yet in this Country, 
I have made all the enquiry I can but as yet have not been able to find 
any of them, there has been no Cattle Stolen or anything extraordinary 
with this district. 

(Sign'd) SAML. EDHOUSE. 

Jtk Subaltern's Command. 

Ensign Rutherford of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg mt . 

Station. Corgarff Barracks. 

Report. 

Nothing extraordinary. 

(Sign'd) Ro. RUTHERFORD. 



Report of Lieut. Ogilvy of Gen/. Pulteney's Reg'"'. At Toinantoul 

detaclid from Stratlibogie. 

July 26, 1750. 

I have received information that one Stewart that is in y e French 
Service was in this Country listing men about three weeks ago, it is 
reported he listed some men and march'd with them with an intention to 
ship them at Leith for France, they tell me he wears a Black Cockade 
and has a Dutch pass and that when he is in Scotland, he lives mostly at 
Grants y e priests, but as all the people in the Country are Roman 
Catholicks it is impossible for me to get almost any intelligence, and on 
account of my taking up the priest, they tell me that they are so much 
enraged against me, that they say they want only an opportunity of 
being revenged. I likewise received information, that one John Grant 



564 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

brother to Grant of Blairfindie in Glenlevitt lists men for the french 
Service, I am likewise informed that this Grant was in Lord Loudoun's 
Reg mt . and was with Gen 1 . Cope in the North, but deserted and joined 
the Rebels, but I have no proof of either of his listing men for the french 
or his being a deserter, as I am inform'd that Grant lives Constantly at 
his Brother's house, I shall do my best endeavours to get proof against 
him, so that I may apprehend him. I am this moment inform'd by Tho s . 
Roye soldier in Lord Drumlanrick's Reg mt . of Scotch Hollanders who 
was sent to me by Corpl. Ross before he went to Strathbogie, that one 
Will : Gowe came into his Quarters this morning, at the Cabrach, in full 
Highland Dress, that he challenged him for wearing the same contrary 
to act of parliament and told him he was to go prisoner, on which the 
said Gowe refus'd to go with him, struck the Corpl. in the execution of 
his Duty. Thos. Stables soldier coming to the Corpl.'s assistance, the s d 
Will : Gowe knok'd him down, and immediately a Mob rose and 
threatened the Corpl. and his party, ordered him not to meddle with 
Gowe otherwise it should cost them their lives, upon which the Corpl. and 
Stables, fir'd upon Gowe and wounded him in such a way, that it is 
thought he cannot recover, immediately the Mob join'd and Corpl. Ross 
and Stables thought proper, to make the best of their way to Strathbogie. 
I have ordered the party at Achnasera, to join that at the Cabrach, to 
keep good order ; as they are all Roman Catholicks in that Country. 

(Sign'd) DAVID OGILVY. 



Report of dipt. Sliarpe of Lord tiury's Reg'" 1 . In the Braes of Angus. 

Aug*. i, 1750. 

I have received information that one Stewart, who carry'd over to 
France several recruits in July 1749 has been lately, and is supposed to be 
about Braemar and Cromar, under Different names, which so soon as I 
get with a description of his person, shall be sure to make a report of 
the same. 

Augt. 17- 

Having obtained information of John Linsey, and Robert Linsey's, 
Singing disloyal Songs, and Drinking the pretender's Health, both in the 
Parishes of Clova and Cortachie, sent a party of a Sergeant and 4 Men 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 565 

in the night to Seize them, but were both from home, however Robert 
Linsey has given Security, for his appearance at the Quarter Sessions to 
take his tryal. As for John Linsey he absconds, having drank Confusion 
to His Majesty King George, and all his men, but am in hopes I shall 
yet Catch him. 

The Serjeant at Loch Lye took a man with a plaid, and carried him 
before a Justice of peace, who finding it to be a Girl's plaid, let him go 
after fining five shillings for putting it on. As yet I have not got 
Stewart's names or the Description of his person, but have heard that he 
had a Dutch recruiting order when he rais'd men in 1 749. 

(Sign'd) HORO. SHAKPE. 

A Copy. Charles Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 

Aug st . 24, 1750. Sent to Col. Napier Aug 1 . 25, 1750. 



REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS AND OFFICERS ON THE HIGHLAND 

POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Swettenham of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg 1 . 

Under his Command, 4 Subs. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg or Glen Lioigh. 

Report. Aug 1 . 27, 1750. Glen Lioigh. 

Lieut. Maxwell Commanding at Tray in South Morra reports that 
his patroles from Kinlochoom saw a man in Arms, but on the fellow 
seeing them he made of to the Mountains, but was pursued so Close, 
that he was oblig'd to throw down his firelock which they took up but 
could not come up with the man, it is a Tower Piece and in very good 
order, nothing extraordinary from any other Posts. 

Sept. 7. 

Lieut. Maxwell being inform'd that some people with Arms, were 
seen in his district, he went in pursuit of them through Arrasaik the two 
Morras Knydart and part of Glen Lye, he at last came up with three 
men who had arms, but pretended a rite to carry them, one was McLeod 
of Arnisdale an except officer his Brother is an officer in the Dutch 



566 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Service and the third a servant of Arnisdale, the Brother produced a 
permitt sign'd Norman McLeod and informs me that several men carry 
arms in his neighbourhood with such permitts, one sign'd Eneas Mclntosh 
which was in the Custody of one McDonald son to the Late Keppoch who 
IA Maxwell apprehended with a pistol by his side he adds that the 
hall at Kinlochoom was quite in Ruines and that Mr. McLeod refusing 
to repair it, he is under a necessity of getting it done himself. 

Ensign Cay Commanding at Strontian has sent me a List and 
description of five Cows which were stolen from Kingerloch given him 
by that Laird to be distributed among my Party. Nothing else extra- 
ordinary. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENHAM. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Molesworth of Genl. Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Subs. 

Station. Laggan Achadrom. 

Report. Aug'. 14, 1750. Laggan. 

On the third day of August I sent a Guide disguis'd as a soldier to 
Ensign Wakeman Commanding at Glenmoriston directing him to march 
to Achnoronnorin a noted receptacle of Thieves, about eight Miles from 
hence, and to surprize it by Dawn of Day, which he effected, bringing 
prisoners to me, Donall McDonall who Confesses himself of the Gang, 
but they miss'd taking Hugh McPhall against whom I principally design 'd 
the party, he being the Captain of them. On the 5 Ensign Wakeman 
took up John Mcmillan upon an information given to me of his being a 
thief, I have sent Mcdonall to Inverness Goal with two evidences against 
him, but keep Mcmillan here, till I can procure proofs, without w h it 
would be in Vain to send him to the Civil Magistrate, so that unless I 
perform the office of a Lawyer in Collecting evidence against these 
Rogues, (a thing almost Impossible in this Country) my being dilligent 
in securing them is of small service. In the Report of Ensign Wakeman 
from Glenmoriston are these Words, " Corporal Turnbull Informs me that 
" when he went to deliver your letter (to the Laird of Chisholm) he saw 
" Chisholm's servant with a Kilt on who upon seeing the Corporal Ran 
" upstairs, and that when the Laird came he acquainted him of it, and 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-5O. 567 

"demanded the Man to be deliver'd to him, he made answer that he 
" would not Cringe to him, nor to the best officer in the army and sent 
"him away with that answer." I thought it proper to report this 
circumstance tho' trivial in itself upon comparing it with two others 
relating to the inhabitants of Strathglas, the one is, that Corpl. Turnbull 
reported some time ago to me their assembling to hear a Nonjuring 
minister, upon which I ordered him to disperse the assembly, but not to 
beat the minister. And the second that upon his apprehending a 
prisoner the people ran together, and told their Laird in hearing of the 
Corpl., that they were strong enough to rescue the Prisoner if he approved 
of it, which at that time it seems he did not, but order'd them to seperate, 
this will serve to show you what kind of spirit yet remains in this 
Country. I served yesterday the Warrants from the Sheriff of Inverness, 
Mr. Scrymgeour, for apprehending the person concern'd in the Late 
rescue upon which I sent out parties to pay his Warrant a Compliment 
well knowing that the men were fled above three weeks ago. In my 
Humble opinion if I had been authoriz'd to proclaim a reward for 
apprehending them, it might have had good effects, I have done nothing 
in relation to the Post of Counchie, mentioned in my last as you did not 
signify to me your approbation of that scheme, the Post of Strathcluny 
would certainly be much eased in their Duty which the weather now 
renders very painful if a party were stationed there. The report brought 
to me of the Sheriff substitute having enlarg'd the prisoner Mclntosh 
whom I sent him, was a Mistake, my Serjt. having been purposely 
Misinform'd by a Rascally Lawyer call'd John Shaw who was employ'd 
for Mclntosh, I promise Mr. Monro the substitute to do him the Justice 
of setting this particular in a right light and I promis'd him at the same 
time to report the Manner of his using me, in relation to one of the 
Women Concern'd in the Rescue some ill designing people had spirited 
her up to prosecute me for detaining her tho' I have three evidences of 
her being guilty and the Sheriff without ever acquainting me as is 
commonly practyced granted a summons against me. As soon as he 
heard the Lord Advocate had undertaken the prosecution, he recall'd his 
officer by express, so that I was not served with it as he intended. I owe 
it to his fear of the Lord Advocate only that he did not proceed to 
Greater Length with me which must have been very detrimental to the 
service here, but as he sufficiently show'd the Motive of his Intention, I 
think it proper to le't him be known to you. 



568 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

I received no direction from the Lord Advocate, by the express which 
you return'd to me, so presume he has none for me. Saunders McDonell 
one whom I depended on as an evidence in the affair of the Rescue is 
Spirited out of the Country which it was impossible for me to prevent 
I shall endeaver to recover him before the 5. of Sept r . but if I should not 
1 have three soldiers are ready to be produced. 

The weather continues excessively bad, the Rivers frequently im- 
passable, so that I am forced some times to receive reports tyed to a 
stone and thrown across the River. 

Aug'. 20. 

I have taken in Baddenoch two horse stealers Viz : John Roy 
McKillichinich and James Grant, of whom I got information about ten 
days ago, they having stolen two horses from Strath Errick. The latter 
says he can vindicate himself but accuses the other. I have sent them 
both under a Guard with a Justice warrant for their Committment, this 
Warrantt was transmitted to me by Lieut. Cumine. One motive for my 
going through Baddenoch was my having been inform'd that McDonald 
of Lochgary with another attainted Rebel had come the length of 
Gavimore, and stay'd there one night being met by some people of that 
Country to whom he distributed letters from abroad and to whom they 
gave assurances of a change of affairs to be brought about the 2d of 
October next. I was in hopes to have got more light into this affair if 
not to have mett with Loch Gary himself but upon enquiry I found 
reason rather to believe the whole story forged tho' in general I may 
venture to assure you that no pains are omitted to keep up the spirits of 
the Jacobites and that not only promises but money is distributed for 
this purpose. Ensign Wakeman from Glen Moriston has sent in John 
Carne a cow stealer as soon as I can procure evidence against him I shall 
send him to Inverness. 

Sept. 13. 

Since my last report everything has been quiet in these parts, no 
thieves stirring nor men in Highland dress excepting two in Strathglas 
who were pursued by my party there, they escaped leaving their Plaid 
behind them. The prisoner I mentioned in my last taken at Glenmoriston 
is sent to Inverness and with him sufficient evidence so I am acquainted 
by the Sheriff of his Committment who likewise writes me word that the 
four prisoners concern'd in the Rescue are admitted to Bail the Lord 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 569 

Advocate having thought proper to postpone their Tryal suspecting the 
partiality of an Inverness Jury. I presume his Lordship when you see 
him will explain this affair to you more at Large than I am able to do, 
and as I do not enter into the reasons of it, it will not become me to 
comment upon it further than to say it gives great spirits to my Neigh- 
bours here who want no encouragement to be insolent. I hope you will 
not think this delay occasioned by any neglect of mine having sent down 
the witnesses in due time and done everything else which was required at 
my hands. 

(Sign'd) JA. MOLESWORTII. 



jrd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Station. Ruthven in Baddenoch. 

Report. Aug 1 . u, 1750. Ruthven. 

Thursday last my patroling party apprehended a man in the Highland 
Dress, one Francis McBean in Danmanglass, which I brought before a 
Justice of peace who committed him to the County Goal. 

Aug'. 25. 

Last week I made a search for Arms in the neighbourhood, I only 
got two old Broadswords, two Durks, an old stager, and a fuzey, all in 
an old outhouse, and the people whom the houses belong'd to declar'd 
that they did not know anything of the arms being there. 

Sept. 8. 

About ten days ago I had information of two horses being stole from 
a man in Strath Errick which Horses we have got, and by a warrant from 
a Justice of peace apprehended the two following thieves, viz. : John Roy 
McKillichinich and Jas. Grant who own'd that they had stolen the said 
Horses at Gavimore, as Capt. Molesworth was there he sent the party 
along with the prisoners to fort augustus, from thence they were sent to 
inverness. There were two Horses stole about two months ago from this 
place but they were found in the Braes of Athol some weeks ago, we can 
get no intelligence of the thieves. Capt. Molesworth and I have appointed 
our parties at Garvimore and Dalwhinny to meet once a week at Cross in 
hands and in the Hills that ly most Contiguous to that place. 

X 2 



57O HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Sept. 15. 

A Wednesday morning I got certain intelligence of men being seen 
with arms in the shealing in Straandhalrick belonging to Mr. McPherson 
of Killyhantly twelve miles South from this, and had taken provisions 
such as Cheese, Butter and Meal, from the people in the Shealings by 
force, there dress was a long Grey coloured Coat and under that each of 
them had a hostler (holster?) with a pistol in it and a durk by their side 
with a large stick in their hands the number was four, and three more 
were seen the Saturday before, so soon as I had received the information, 
I sent expresses of to the parties that were stationed in the places most 
probable they would return with their prey, with orders to them to 
patrole for some nights in the passes that I had mentioned to them in my 
letter. My Dalwhinny party the night they received my Orders patrol'd 
to Loch Avach and Loch Lagan, where they found four horses tyed 
together that belong'd to one Donald Stewart in Dalwhinny, they were 
stole from him Saturday night last, the thieves they could not see, there 
is very great reason to believe they were not far off, those two lochs are 
the greatest passes for thieves to drive their Cattle through in all the 
Country. I have been out myself with a party of men for these several 
nights in search of these thieves and cannot as yet light upon them. 
Yesterday I took up one John McPherson for wearing the Philibeg, and 
sent him into Inverness this day by a warrant from a Justice of peace. 

(Sign'd) ALEX. CUMINE. 



j.tfi Captain s Command. 

Capt. Patton of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, i Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. Sept. 5, 1750. Invercomcry. 

The 28 Ulto. a party from Dalnachadoch went in pursuit of some 
Lochaber Thieves who had stolen four horses from one Stewart who 
lives in Banrannach, and after five days pursuit took Cameron the thief 
prisoner, and recover'd one of the Horses near Fort William, and as they 
were returning with him ; the poor soldiers not believing that Stewart's 
View was to Compound the felony, very Idly suffer'd the thief and he to 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1/49-50. 57! 

go some distance from them, and after the Villain had given him his 
demand, he suffer'd him to make his escape so far before he Call'd for 
help, that it was out of the parties power to retake him. 

(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 

j//i Captain's Command. 

Capt. Ball of Coll. Dockland's Regiment. 

Under His Command, 2 Sub 1 . 

Station. Inversnade Barracks. 

Report. Sept. 16, 1750. Inversnade. 

Nothing extraordinary, but the patrole from the Bridge of truk 
saw a man with a Plaid which they pursued, the man got from thence 
but left his Plaid. 

(Sign'd) THOS. BALL. 

6tk Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Genl Pulteney's Reg"". 

Under his Command, one Sub. 

Station. Brae Marr Barracks. 

Report. 

Nothing extraordinary; No thieving, or Men in the Highland Dress. 

(Sign'd) SAML. EDHOUSE. 

"jtk Subaltern's Command. 

Ensign Rutherford of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Regiment. 

Station. Corgarf Barrack. 

Report. Aug 1 . 27, 1750. 

I thought proper to acquaint you, that I have had Information, there 
are some officers in the french Service in the Country, and shall wait your 
Orders how I shall act in respect to them, I hear one of their Names is 
Joseph Stewart, son to one Stewart of Barlar, the Earl of Aboyne's 
forrester, I have not yet been able to get any Intelligence of their 
Recruiting, though I have us'd my utmost endeavour for that purpose. 

(Sign'd) Ro. RUTHERFORD. 



572 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Lieut. Ogilvy of Genl. Pulteney's Reg Hlt . at TomantouL Detach'd from 

Strathbogie. 

Reports nothing extraordinary. 

(Sign'd) DAVID OGILVIE. 

Capt. Sharpe of Lord Bnry's Reg' 1 ' 1 , in the Braes of Angus. 

Report. Nothing extraordinary. 

(Sign'd) THOS. SHARPE. 

This Command was Order'd to join the Regiment the beginning of 
this Month, which they have done. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 

Edin: September 23, 1750. Sent to Mr. Fox the 25th. 

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAINS AND OFFICERS ON THE HIGHLAND 

POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Captain Swettenham of Gen 1 . Guise's Regiment. 

Under His Command, 4 Subalterns. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg or Glen Lioigh. 

Report. September 24, 1750. Glen Lioigh. 

Lieut. Maxwell in His letter of the 20 Instant, Complains of McLeod 
of Arnisdale mentioned in my Last, as harbouring and concealing an 
attainted Rebel, viz. : the eldest son of Barrisdale notwithstanding the 
said McLeod is an officer in the Excise. I thought it my Duty to Inform 
you of this, he reports nothing extraordinary. 

Ensign Cay from Strontian reports all well in his district. 

Ensign Patton from Glenfinnan, reports nothing extraordinary. 

Ensign Irving reports that in his patrole he mett nothing extra only 
saw two men with Phillibegs on, whom he persued, but they getting into 
a Hutt, mixing with others and Dropping the Phillibeg before he could 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 573 

get in, he could not prove who wore that Dress, however in order to 
Terrify them he seiz'd on two Men, pinion'd them and march'd them 
away prisoners, and after some time dismiss'd them as he had no Proof. 
The Sergeant Commanding the party at the Head of Loch Arkeg sent 
me a younge mare on the 16 which was brought to him by Cameron of 
Glen Dessery w ch was a stray. The Serjt. keept it three days, giving 
proper intimation to the adjacent, but nobody Claiming it I deliver'd it 
to the Sheriff substitute at Marryburgh. 

Oct. 8. 

From the officers commanding the sundry posts in my district I have 
reports that nothing extraordinary has happen'd. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENIIAM. 



2nd Captain's Command. 

Captain Molesworth of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, two Subs. 

Station. Laggan Achadrom. 

Report. Sept. 27, 1750. Laggan. 

On the 1 8 of this Month my Party apprehended John McShadrick in 
the Braes of Glengary, and sent him to the Sheriff of Inverness with a 
Justice's Warrant for his Committment being charged with Stealing Cattle. 

On the iQth I received accounts, that persons Arm'd and in Plaid to 
the Number of fifteen had appear'd in Strathmashie and a smaller party 
in Glen Banchor also that four arm'd with Durks and pistols had Robbed 
a sheiling twelve Miles from Ruthven, of provision which is their usual 
way of providing for a March I heard likewise that a party, probably the 
same, had been seen on the Hills near snug borough, and that they 
design'd to push through Rannoch, for England with any acquisition they 
should make avoiding the fair at Crief, I immediately dispatch'd an 
express to Capt. Patton Commanding in Rannoch with these accounts, 
and ordered the patroling officer to march by Glen Roy, Glenspean, and 
the South side of Loch Laggan to Strathmashie and to visit Garvemore, 
Dalwhinny, Glentryme and Glen Banchor he was further ordered to 
pursue them if he found their track wherever it might lead him, he had 
a Serjt. and 14 Men with him for this service, and I with 6 Men joined 



574 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749'SO- 

the Party at the Head of Glen Spean as the properest post to intercept 
any that might slip by the patroll in case they are driven back from 
Rannoch. but after 4 days patrole, and Lying all night in the passes on 
the Mountains we could not get any Intelligence of their motions so that 
I think it probable they dispersed on the first notice of our march. The 
Men under my Command continue healthy notwithstanding the severity 
of the service, and I have set up a convenient Hutt sixty foot in Length 
for Lodging theMoving patrole who had before scarce anydry Lodging after 
their fatiguing Duties. This had been done sooner but for the untractable 
disposition of the Country people here, some of whom have begun a suit 
against me at Inverness for pressing their horses and tools toward 
expediting the work which was at first undertaken at their own request, 
as it would ease them of the Burthen of Quartering Soldiers. I am 
advised to procure an Advocation to remove the Cause to Edinburgh, 
which method I shall pursue when they have served their summons on 
me, which they have not yet done. 

I have long forseen that my endeavours to advance His Majesty's 
Service here, as they could not be agreable to these people, would become 
an object of their utmost opposition and a fund of uneasiness to me. 

I hope however, that they will not be able through any misrepresenta- 
tion, to induce your belief, that I have acted otherwise than for the 
interest of the service to the best of my judgment. To be approved as 
an officer is my principal View and with regard to the Law, if they bring 
this matter to a Tryal I hope it will be found, that I have much to offer 
in my vindication. 

Oct. ii. 

On the 29 day of September the party at Strathglass apprehended 
Archibald Chisholm in Glencannick of Strathglas, wearing the Phillibeg, 
and he is at my instance committed to Inverness Goal for six months. 
The day following a young fellow in full Plaid was pursued by the said 
party on their patrole, and to avoid them attempted swimming a Loch 
and was drown'd the ill-disposed people of the Country hereupon 
invented a story to throw odium on the Soldiers importing that he was 
shot by the men in the water, but so entirely groundless was their 
assertion that the inventors themselves wanted the confidence to repeat it. 
Oct. 4 the party in Laggan assisted by a Guide procured from Urquhart 
apprehended John Cameron of Brigath in Glen Roy charged with theft 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 575 

by Alex. Grant, Esq. I have deliver'd the prisoner to Inverness Goal 
and the above Mr. Grant is bound to prosecute him. I must here 
observe to you that the several Complaints of thefts which I have 
reported to you, have referrence to a time before the party took its post, 
not four Cows having been stolen since the 22 May in the whole district, 
and some few horses which have been most part of them recovered and 
delivered to their owners. 

As I informed you in my last that a Prosecution was begun against 
me, for pressing tools and horses to build a Hutt for the Soldiers, which 
I did by allowance and desire of Glengary the superior of the Ground I 
must now acquaint you, that the said prosecution has been carried on 
with all the Virulence which might be expected from the known dis- 
position of the people here. They served a Criminal Summons against 
me, my Serjt, Corporal and 4 Soldiers of my party, and though I did not 
think proper to order them to repair to Inverness which would have 
gratified the pride of their accusers and frustrated the end of their being 
stationed here, I nevertheless went myself to Inverness, both to shew a 
proper respect to the Court of His Majesty's Sheriff, and to take care 
that the Cause might be put into proper Hands, and not suffer thro' 
Neglect or Mismanagement, I answer'd for the whole in Court, and 
produced my reasons for the non-appearance of the men which were 
admitted by Mr. Monro the Sheriff substitute the Lawyers against me 
pour'd out many threadbare invectives against officers of the Army, and 
demanded a high pecuniary Mulct but as I was advised by the Council I 
employ'd that there was an Illegality or rather a Nullity in the form of 
my adversary's proceeding I thought fit to insist on that, that so their 
lawyers might be deprived of their darling topick of abusing the Army, 
as they could not proceed on an enquiry into the Merits of the Cause, 
tho' I offered to stand to a precognition properly taken and to remitt it 
to a jury which they refused, hereupon the Sheriff dismissed all parties, 
and deserted the dyet they now threatened to remove it. before the Lords, 
and to punish the Sheriff also, to whom in Court they did not scruple to 
offer the most insolent indignities. I am taking the proper precautions 
in case they persist in their design and shall send by this post to Major 
Lee the authentick extract of the proceedings of the Sheriffs Court, that 
he may employ some proper person to act for me at Edin : I hope I shall 
appear to (have) acted in such a manner as that the Service shall incur 



576 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

no disgrace thro' my means, sure I am that all Honest and well disposed 
people in these parts do most thankfully applaud the disposition of His 
Majesty's Troops here and arc not wanting in acknowledgements, to 
those honoured with the execution of his Orders for my part I think it a 
misfortune to be accused, but I count it a happiness to be disliked by 
such as are my adversaries in the present Cause. 

(Sign'd) J. MOLKSWORTII. 



3rd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Gen 1 . Guise's Regiment. 

Station. Ruthvcn in Baddenoch. 

Report. Sept. 29, 1750. Ruthven. 

I have not as yet heard any thing of those Thieves that I mentioned 
to you in my Last, although I have made all the search Imaginable after 
them ; I am of opinion that they have returned home again without doing 
any harm, as I have not heard of anything being stole, for they could not 
Conceal themselves so long in the Country without being heard of, my 
patroling party returned yesterday, they found everything quiet and not 
any Intelligence of Thieves. 

Oct. 13. 

I have heard for these ten day past of a good many Thieves being 
in the Hills towards Stratherick they have been so lucky as yet, to have 
kept out of the parties way. I have information from my Corporal that 
is Quartered at Dunmanglas in Stratherick of three Cows being stole 
from his Landlady the 6 Instant, the party and the owners have been in 
search of them ever since, and have found the track, in the Laird of 
Gortherick's Lands, and can't bring it out of that, so it is Imagin'd that 
some of his people has stole them, if Gortherick cannot free his Ground 
of the track, I am told he will be oblig'd to pay the Cowes. The owner 
has sent to me, to know what she should do, in the affair, and I am at a 
loss to know what advice to give her, or to do anything in it, as my orders 
don't mention any thing of such Casses. This is the only Cattle I have 
heard of being stolen, that has not been got again. My moving patrole 
is Just returned from patroling this week past in the Hills of Glen Mashie, 
Stranlarg, Glen Killen, Glen Magerore(P) all in Stratherick and Strathnairn, 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 577 

which are the most suspected places, and the greatest passes, for the 
Thieves to be in, in all the Country. The party did not see or hear of 
thieves being there or Cattle stole, but those from Stratherick. My 
parties are out every other night guarding, the most suspected passes, 
and this day fortnight my dunmanglas party patroled to the Shealing of 
Linney Cluck, in the Glen of Mashie, ten Miles south of Dunmanglas, it 
was night before they got to the Glen, and when they got pretty near the 
shealing, two men came out in arms, and run past the party, upon which 
they fired several shot after the fellows and Cry'd to them to stop, one of 
them fell down but soon got up again, and left his arms behind him, the 
Corporal Imagin'd he was wounded, because he had left his Gun in the 
place he had fallen, both the fellows ran into the wood that was in the 
Glen, the party pursued but the Night turning dark, could make nothing 
of them, so they guarded the wood all night, and search'd the next 
Morning all in Vain, for they have not been able to hear anything, then 
nor since of them, the guide the party had with them told the Corporal, 
that they must be Thieves, for no other people, stay'd in that part of the 
Glen in this Season of the year, it being the most dangerous pass in the 
Highlands for thieves, when the party return'd to the shealing, they found 
a very good fire, the fore Quarters of a (steer ?), and two Highland Plaids, 
which was all the things, that were in the shealing, nothing else extra- 
ordinary since my last, I have put all my patroles upon my Guard, this 
being the most dangerous time in the year for Thieves. 

(Sign'd) ALEXR. CUMINK. 

4.th Captain's Command. 

Captain Patton of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under his Command, one Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoch. 

Report. Oct. 2, 1750. Invercomry. 

The party at Kinnachan Bridge apprehended one Stewart habited in 
Tartan Kilt, and Phillebeg, whom I have this morning sent prisoner to 
the Sheriff substitute at Killin. 

Lieut. Forster is just return'd from Patroling all round the different 
Quarters, and has heard of no stolen Cattle nor any kind of Thieving 
within the district, or any excepted Rebells lurking in this Country. 

(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 
v 2 



578 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 



5th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Ball of Col. Dockland's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 2 Subs. 

Station. Invcrsnade Barracks. 

Report. Oct. 6, 1750. Inversnade. 

As the parties from Glen Falloch and Stonachlocher were patroling 
through Glen Gile on Thursday, 4th Inst, they saw two men in the 
Highland Dress one of which had a Gun, driving 12 head of Cattle, on 
the parties going towards them, the men took to the Mountains, which 
gave suspicion they were stolen, the Copl. drove them to the Laird of 
Glen Giles, who ovvn'd eleven of them and the other is left with them, 
no cxtraordinaries has happen'd. 

(Sign'd) THOS. BALL. 



6th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Genl. Pultency's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, i Sub. 

Station. Brae Mar Barrack. 

Report. Oct 1 . 7, 1750. Brae Mar. 

I sent a Corp 1 , and 4 Men into Glen Ilbay(?) to a place Call'd 
Kirkmichael, having received a report that six head of Cattle was 
taken out of that Glen belonging to four different people but they did 
not acquaint my Sergeant at Glen Shee of it till about eight Days after 
the Cattle were missing and at the same time the owners did not think 
them worth following, as they pretend they should Loose getting in 
their Harvest, my patroles went round all the district and made all the 
enquiries they could but did not get any account of their being any 
Thieves seen in this part of the Country, found no Arms or seen any in 
a dress contrary to Law. Nothing extraordinary, and by what I can 
learn by the Gentlemen of the Country that at this time of the year the 
Cattle often stray away and will be missing for a Considerable time, and 
yet they will find their way back again. 

(Sign'd) SAML. EDHOUSE. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 579 



Jtli Subaltern's Command. 

Ensign Rutherford of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg mt . 

Station. Corgarff Barrack. 

Report. Oct. 12, 1750. Corgarf. 

One of the Soldiers of this Garrison, had his fingers Cut very desper- 
ately by a fellow in the Country on Wednesday last, the soldier says it 
was because he would not Drink the pretender's health, but the fellow 
denies that, however I sent a party, and had him apprehended at night, 
and he was sent to Justice of peace who has order'd him to find Bail to 
stand his trial on Monday next. 

(Sign'd) Ro. RUTHERFORD. 



Lieut. Ogilvy of Genl. Pulteney's Reg'" 1 . At Tomantonl, Detach' d 

from Stratlibogie. 

Report. Nothing extraordinary. 

(Sign'd) DAVID OGILVV. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 

Edin: Oct. 24, 1750. Sent to Mr. Fox, Oct. 25, 1750. 



REPORTS OF CAPTAINS AND OFFICERS ON THE HIGHLAND POSTS. 

ist Captain's Command. 

Capt. Swettenham of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg mt . 

Under His Command, 4 Subalterns. 

Station. Head of Loch Arkeg or Glen Lioigh. 

Report. Nov. 5, 1750. Glen Lioigh. 

Lieut. Maxwell from Tray, in Morarr, informs me, he has made 
several attempts since last Report to send out Patroles, but they were 
prevented by the Snow, and w th much difficulty returned to Quarters. 
He adds, that he is assured that it will not be in his Power to patrole any 
more this season. 



50 HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 

Authoriz'd by the Route brought by last post, I have sent Mr. 
Maxwell Orders to repair w th his Party forthw th to F. W m ., as his present 
Situation is such that he is liable to be intercepted by the Snows, which 
fall very thick every night. From the other Posts in my District I have 
nothing extraordinary, but the general Reports of the weather's becoming 
inclement. However as none are absolutely prevented patroling, except 
Lieut. Maxwell I have not call'd any other in, and shall make a proper 
Use of the Discretionary Powers confer'd on me by the Route. 

Nov. 19. 

On the 15 Inst. All the Parties under my Coand arrived safe at F. W m . 
except Lieut. Maxwell, who with his Detach mt . came in the day following. 
They brought me nothing extraordinary to report. 

(Sign'd) JOHN SWETTENIIAM. 

2nd Captain's Command. 

Capt. Molesworth of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg 11 ". 

Under his Command, 2 Subalterns. 

Station. Laggan Achadrom. 

Report. Oct. 25. Laggan. 

Since my last Report, nothing extraordinary has happen'd on my 
Command. I have sent to most of Gent m . round the Country, who have 
no Complaints of Cattle lost. The Snows w h have fallen for 4 Days 
past, have put me into some pain, as to the Communication between the 
different Posts. 

Nov b . 9th. 

Since my last report, nothing has been done, excepting the Taking of 
Donal MacPhie, alias Cameron, the most noted Thief in the Highlands, 
and therefore call'd here the wolf. He was surpriz'd at a Town call'd 
Badendoch, upon the River Quich, at 12 at Night. I have sent him to 
Inverness, and tho' I doubt whether he will be capitally prosecuted, yet 
his being in Plad, and Arms will suffice for a reason of keeping him 6 
Months in Prison. 

Nov b . 1 6th. 

Pursuant to a Route rec d . from you, on the I5th Day of Nov. I 
marched from Laggan having collected all my Parties from their Posts 
and sent to F. Augustus, such of the Parties as belong'd to the 4 Comps. 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 581 

there ; The Party going to F. Augustus met with a man in a Philibegg, 
servant to McDonald of Leeke, and carried him Prisoner to F. Augustus. 
The Party at Lounkie rescued four Cows belonging to Strathglass w h the 
Thieves were driving that way, not suspecting the Party was there. The 
Thieves escaped by means of an adjacent wood. The Thieves of Note 
whom I leave in the Country are John Kennedy, called Bricke, or Pocke 
or Pocpitted. He is a Deserter from the British Service ; middle siz'd, 
sandy hair, strong made, and speaks a little English. His house is at the 
Bank of the River Glaster near Killenann, about a Mile to the Westward 
of Laggan and a little to the Northward of Loch Lochky. He has 
sometimes his Residence over ag st the place just described, upon ye 
South of the Loch at his Sisters. He has also a lurking hut in the 
MacMartins Wood about 3 Miles to the Westward of Laggan, and within 
a mile of Letterfinlay. He sometime haunts a Town called Badendock 
upon the River Quick. His age is about 35 and he is the most subtle, 
most desperate, and most famous Thief in the Highlands. He goes 
always arm'd. The next is MacArthur of Glen Luigh, Senior, a Deserter 
from L d . John Murray's Reg 1 . He was nearly taken by one of my Parties, 
and since that took the Hills. He is a strong middle aged man, his 
Brother lives in Glen Luig, and is a Deserter from Drumlanrig's Reg'., 
but I have heard nothing of his thieving. Alister Dow or Black Cameron 
is a Lad of about 24, pretty tall, but clumsy made, well-faced with black 
eyes and hair. He resides sometimes in Glen Luig, sometimes in Glen 
Roy, tho' young he has been long a thief. John McDonell, nephew to 
the above Kennedy, and his pupil. He is young, tall, and well-look'd, 
with light hair. He always rob'd in Compx. \v th Kennedy, and lately the 
other 2 have associated with him, the whole being under the direction of 
Kennedy. Ewin Oge and John Oge and McPhie at Glen Kinna, five 
Miles from Ballachen upon the River Quick, are of some note, they stole 
from about Kintail, and drive generally into the Brays of Loch Arkeg. 
I am not able to describe their Persons. 

(Sign'd) JAMES MOLESWORTH. 

jrd Subaltern's Command. 

Lieut. Cumine of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg'. 
Station. Ruthven in Badenoch. 



582 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-5O. 

Report. Oct. 27. Ruthen. 

The Cows I mentioned in my last Report that were stolen out of 
Strathkerry, were got the i6th Current, near y e Wood of Lough Beg in 
Glengary. The two men that stole them were Kennedys belonging to 
that Country, and Capt. Molesworth's Party as I inform'd anew, are now 
in search of those men. There were 5 Oxen stolen the 14 Current from 
John Mcpherson at Dalwhinny ; but they were got again at Loch Laggan. 
This is all the Theft I have heard of since my last We have had in this 
Country for this fortnight past continual Frost and Snow, which makes 
it impracticable for the Patroling parties to travel through y e Hills or my 
out Parties to meet. I am informed by y e People in the Country, that 
my Parties can't patrole on the Hills any more this Season. 

Nov 1 '. loth. 

I was favour'd, Wednsday last, with y r Orders to march into Winter 
Quarters. I have the pleasure to acquaint you, that since my being 
stationed here there has been no Cattle stolen from any Pson, but what 
have been recovered. As to Conceal'd Arms I never had the least 
information of any being in the Country. I have laid myself out, ever 
since I came here, to get Intelligence of any attainted Psons, but never 
could be able to get any Information. The Country is and has been very 
peaceable and quiet. 

Nov b . iQth. 

According to y r Orders I marched the Detach"", under my Coand 
from Ruthven the I5th Inst. to Quarters. All in good Health. Nothing 
extraordinary has happen'd since my last. 

(Sign'dj ALEXR. CUMINE. 

j.t/i Captain's Command. 

Capt. Patton of Gen 1 . Guise's Reg 1 . 

Under his Command, I Sub. 

Station. Head of Loch Rannoc. 

Report. October 16. Invercomry. 

As it has been an ordinary practice for y e Highland Drovers from 
their return from Crief fare, to steal Cattle from the Low Country w ch 
they were accustomed to drive by the Head of Loch Tay and Lion, and 
by the important Pass at Cam, half way between this, and Augh Chalada, 



HIGHLAND REPORTS, 1749-50. 583 

a large Village near Dillebegg, I therefore sent a Serj t>s Comand who 
rear'd up a Hut for themselves where they remained three weeks, but 
never got the least notice of any Thefts committed thereabout, nor have 

1 in any part of my district but, as I apprehended so great a No. of 
People returning from Crief Fair might steal Cattle somewhere, and 
being pswaded they would purposely avoid all the Passes, where our 
Soldiers are station'd I therefore judg'd it expedient to set all the 
different parties in motion, as the Patroling Parties had certainly the best 
chance of meeting with them, but to no purpose. 

Nov h . Qth. 

Mr. Menzies of Culldears has been remarkably civil to us, as has old 
Cameron of Kinlochleven to the Parties stationed there. On the contrary, 
those Quarter'd in Glenco rec d the worst of usage, and greatest Ignominy 
by the Instigation of Macdonald, who had been some years kept Prisoner 
in Ed r . Castle ; and one Stewart of that Glen. The Landlord in the road 
from Tay Bridge mentioned in my Instructions is dead. John Cameron, 
who sells Whiskey in Finnard is a most notorious Thief, as is his Brother ; 
and most people in y l Village have formerly been detected of Thievish 
Prancks ; and John McDonald of this place is also a suspected Person. 

(Sign'd) HENRY PATTON. 

jf/t Captains Command. 

Capt. Ball of Col. Bockland's Reg 1 . 
Under His Command, 2 Subs. 
Station. Innersnaid Barrack. 
Report. Nov. 7th. 

On Friday the 2 Inst. a Patrole from This saw a man in the Highland 
Dress w ch they pursued. He quit his Plad and got off ; and on Saturday 

2 Sheep and a Cow was stolen from Innersnaid. I made search as 

Directed but to no Effect. 

(Sign'd) Tuos. BALL. 

6th Captain's Command. 

Capt. Edhouse of Gen 1 . Pulteney's Reg 1 . 
Under his Command, i Sub. 



584 HIGHLAND REPORTS, I749-SO. 

Station. Braemar Barrac. 

Report. Nov. 4. 

There has been such a prodigous Quantity of Snow fallen, w th in this 
fortnight past, that my Patroles could not go out, and it was w th great 
difficuly, y' I coud get in my Reports from the out Parties. Nothing has 
happen'd extraordinary since my last Report. 

(Sign'd) SAML. EDHOUSE. 



jtli Subaltern's Command. 

Ens. Rutherford of Gen. Pulteney's Reg 1 . 

Station. Corgarff Barrac. 

Report. Nothing extraordinary since my Last. 

(Sign'd) ROBT. RUTHERFORD. 

Lt. Ogihy of Gen. Pulteney's Rtg'. at Tomantoitl. Detach 'd from 

Strathbogie. 

Reports nothing extraordinary since the last. 

(Sign'd) DAVID OGILW. 

A Copy. Cha: Collier, Aid-de-Camp. 

Edin: No. 25, 1750. Sent to Mr. Fox No. 27, 1750. 



APPENDIX. 

XXXVIII. 
EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

KING'S COLLEDGE of Aberdeen the Twentiefifth day of April J m vij c 
and Sixteen years. 

Convened the Sub-principal, Mediciner, Humanist, Mr. Burnet regent, 
and Mr. George Gordon professor of the oriental Languages. 

The which Day, The Principal having acquainted the meeting by 
John Hay janitor That he could not attend this meeting being necessarly 
detained, But desired that the masters present should proceed and minut 
what should be done at this Meeting, And how soon he was in condition 
to come to his Chamber in the Colledge, he should cause record in the 
Colledge minuts whatever was done by the masters present this day. 

The masters having at severall former meetings being informed of 
severall disorders comitted by some students the tyme of the Late 
rebellion, Do accordingly this day proceed to a tryall of what students 
have been Guilty. In order to which the following witnesses were 
examined by way of precognition. 

Compeared William Walker, Drummer in Old Aberdeen, married 
man, aged 68 years or thereby. Witness examined and interrogat anent 
the forsaid disorders, Declares that upon the first Thursday of february 
Last, Patrick and John Ogilbys, Bursars in the said Colledge with 
William Moir, Bursar ther, Came to the Declarants house, And forced the 
Declarant to come out with his Drum to goo through the toune of Old 
Aberdeen, and make a proclamation Desiring all persons to come and 
see the Duke of Brunswick in effigie comitted to flames, which proclama- 
tion was made by Robert Warrander, another Bursar in the said Colledge. 

z 2 



586 EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

After which proclamatioun the Declarant came to a Bon-fyre at the sd 
Colledge gate, where he saw the forenamed Bursars and severall other 
students, And that he saw the said William Moir having between the 
Ramer and the Musle of his gun a Picture on paper which he had carried 
in processioun through the said toune, which they called the picture 
of the Duke of Brunswick, which picture the sd Robert Warrander 
delyvered to the Declarant and ordered him to burn it, which when he 
had throwen out of his hand the wind carrayed it away, But was there- 
after catched by a Boy and Brunt in the fyre, which Boy the deponent 
knows not, And declares he saw the saids Bursars drink the pretenders 
health at the sd fyre by the name of King James the Eight, and this is 

the truth, And Declares he cannot write. 

A. FRASER, Subprinl. 

Compearcd Patrick Lesly, Bursar in the sd Colledge, aged 15 years 
or thereby, Declares that upon the forsaid Day he passing by the said 
Bonfyre at the Colledge, saw William Moir, John Ogilby, Angus Sage, 
and Robert Warrander, with William Walker, Drummer, all standing at 
the said Bonfyre, And that John Ogilbie told the Declarant that the 
Duke of Brunswick's pictur was brunt in the fyre, And declaires he 
knows no more of the matter, And this is the truth. 

A. FRASER, Subprinl. PAT: LESLIE. 

Compeared George Mitchell, Bursar in the sd Colledge, aged 16 years 
or thereby. Witness examined ut supra Declaires that upon the said 
first Thursday of february Last He saw William Moir come up the Old 
tounc street with the pictur of the Duke of Brunswick as they called it 
fixed behind the Musle and Ramer of his Gun in company with Robert 
Warrander, John Ogilbie, Angus Sage, William Ord, all Bursars in the 
said Colledge, and William Walker, Drummer, And that he heard the sd 
Rt Warrander Say and publish that the said pictur of the Duke of 
Brunswick was to be comitted to the flames, And that he heard the 
forsaids Bursars and ane Patrick Douglas tell that the sd pictur was 
actually brunt And knows no more of the matter, And this is the truth, 
And further Declaires that he Saw Keneth M c Kenzie, Bursar, wt them, 
And that most of the said Bursars had Guns and pistolls. 

A. FRASER, Subprinl. GEO : MlTCHEL. 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 587 

Compeared Alex. Hay, major student in the sd Colledge, aged 16 years 
or thereby. Witness examined and interrogat Declares that upon the sd first 
Thursday of february Last He Saw the said William Moir with the Duke 
of Brunswick pictur as they called it in his Gun in company with Robert 
Warrander, John and Patrick Ogilbys, Angus Sage, William Ord, and 
Keneth McKenzie, all Bursars in the said Colledge, And that Wm. Moir 
and Angus Sage had Guns and Keneth McKenzie and William Ord 
pistolls, And that he saw all the forenamed Bursars goo through the Old 
toune the length of the Humanist's gate with Wm. Walker, Drummer, 
who was beatting his Drum, And that the sd Rt Warrander made a 
proclamatioune that the Duke of Brunswick was to be comitted in effigie 
to the flames, And that thereafter he saw the saids persones returne to the 
Bonfyre at the Colledge gate, And that he heard the said William Ord 
making his Vant that Day that the said Pictur was brunt, And knows no 
more of the mater. 

A. FRASKR, Subprinll. ALEXANDER HAY. 

Thereafter the masters adjourned their meeting till Friday's morning 
at nyne o'clock, and appointed the Janitor to acquant all the masters to 
attend punctually. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



AT the King's Colledge of Aberdeen the Twentie-seventh day of 
Aprill J m vij c and sixteen years, Convened the Subprincipall, 
Civilist, Mediciner, Humanist, Mr. Alexr. Burnet, Regent, and 
Mr. George Gordon, Professor of the oriental! Languages. 

Which Day the Subprincipal and Humanist declared that they had 
spoke with the Principal!, And that he had told them that he had such 
necessary avocatiouns as could not allow him for some tyme to be 
present at Colledge meetings, And therefore earnestlie Recomended the 
masters not to neglect or postpone any Colledge affairs Because of his 
absence, But to meet and proceed in all things after the ordinary maner 
as if he was present. 

A. ERASER, Subprinll. 



588 EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

The which Day the masters Continue the sentence agt. the Bursars 
In regaird that there is ane informatioune given agt. some students who 
had harrangud in the publick schooll reflecting on the King and his 
Generalls, And that till Monday next untill the sd affaire be examined. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



The which Day the masters foresaid having examined John Hay, 
Janitor of the said Colledge, anent these alleged disorders comitted by 
him the tyme of the sd. rebellion, They find the said John Confesses he 
waited on the Earle Marischall as he passed through this toune of 
the Old toune (as he was ust to doo at former tymes when the Earls 
Marischall came or went from Abdn.) being the day that the pretender 
was proclaimed at the Old touns cross on horse back, But denys that he 
had his sword clrawen the tyme of the proclamatioune, And Declares he 
did not know that there was to be such a proclamatioune at the sd Cross, 
And as to ringing of the Colledge Bells, owned he was Compelled by the 
forenamed students guilty of the first disorders, And that the ringing of 
the sd Bells was to prevent the breaking of the doors or spoiling the 
Bells and Clock. And farder Confesses that he was upon the Castlegate 
of Aberdein with the rest of the Spectators the tyme that the pretender 
was proclaimed at Aberdein, But had no sword nor was any wayes active 
or assisting the tyme of the said proclamation, As also the saids masters 
having examined John Dey, College Porter, They find he confesses he 
was present as a spectator when the Pretender was proclaimed both in 
Abdn and the Old toune, But was in no wayes active or assisting the 
tyme thereof, And that he was compelled by the forenamed guilty 
students to ring the Colledge bells the tyme foresaid, Lest the doors of 
the steeple should have been broke by them or the Bells and clock 
spoiled, which they threatened to doe, And that before he opened the 

door the Bolt of the Lock was bowed. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



The masters adjurne their meeting till Munday next at nyne in the 

morning. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 589 

At the King's Colledge of Aberdeen the Threttieth day of Aprill 
Jm v jjc anc j sixteen years, Convened the Subprincipall, Civilist, 
Humanist, Mediciner, Mr. Burnet, regent, and Mr. George Gordon, 
professor of the Oriental Languages. 

Compearcd Thomas Ragg, student in the sd Colledge, aged 17 years 
or thereby. Witness examined and interrogate, Declares that he heard 
some day of the months of December or January Last Robert Warrandcr 
foresaid, Bursar in the said Colledge, declaim or harrangue in the publick 
Schooll, which Harrangue reflected on the King and his Generalls, and 
contained the following words, which the declarant yet minds, viz., 
Regique haec dicite vestro non illi imperium Scotiae solumque Jacob!, 
&c., being the words of Virgill transpressed. As also the said Robert 
Warrander in his sd oration had several reflecting expressions upon the 
Duke of Argyll and the Earle of Sutherland, As also Declaires he heard 
the said Keneth McKenzic, Bursar in the said Colledge, Declaim and 
have ane publick harrangue in the publick schooll some day of the sd 
months of December or January Last reflecting on his Matie, and 
containing the following words : Jacobum nostrum regem c manibus 
schismaticorum et hereticorum Libcres. Et dicat totus populus Amen. 
And further Declaires he heard James Gatt, Bursar in the said Colledge, 
on some days of the sd months harrangue in sd public Schooll, And 
which contained some disloyall expressions tending to the purpose, That 
if the Usurper were turned off his Throne ct Imperante Jacobo Octavo 
then honest men would get their posts, And knows no more of the 
mater. And this is the truth. 

A. ERASER, Subprinll. THOMAS RAGG. 

Compearcd William Marr, Student in ths sd Colledge, aged 17 years 
or thereby, Witness interrogat and examined Declaires he heard the said 
Robert Warrander declaim in the said publick schooll in the moneths of 
Deer, or January Last, wherein he heard some words in comondation of 
the Pretender under the name of King James the Eight and Reflecting 
on the Earle of Sutherland and his Highland Robbers, And remembers 
no more of the matter, and this he declares to be truth. 

A. ERASER, Subprinll. WILLIAM MARK. 



S9O EXTRACTS FROM KING ( S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

Compeared Keneth Forbes, Student in the said Colledge, aged 18 
years or thereby. Witness examined and Interrogat Declaires he heard 
the said Robert Warrander the tyme foresaid declaim and have a 
harrangue in the sd publick schooll Reflecting on the King and his 
Generalls and containing these words Vos o Whiggoi post decermina 
mundi Maturate fugam regique haec dicite vestro Non illi imperium 
Scotiae solumque Jacobi, &c. And particularly reflecting on the Duke 
of Argyle and the Earle of Sutherland, And farder Declaires he heard 
the sd Keneth iVIcKenzie and William Ord about the tyme foresaid 
declaim and have publick harrangues in the publick schooll reflecting on 
the King and his Generalls, And this is all he knows of the matter, And 
declaires the same to be truth. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. KENNETH FORBESS. 



Compeared Hugh Fraser, Bursar in the sd. Colledge, aged 18 years or 
thereby. Witness receaved and Interogat Declaires he heard the said 
James Gatt about the tyme foresaid declaim and have a harrangue in the 
sd publick schooll in comondatione of the pretender under the name of 
King James the eighth, and this is the truth. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. HUGH FRASER. 

Compeared the said George Mitchell, Bursar in the said Colledge, 
And being examined, Declaires he heard the said William Ord about the 
tyme forsaid declaim and have a publick harrange in the sd schooll 
Reflecting on the King and his Generalls, And this is the truth. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. GEO. MITCHELL. 



The Masters and Members of the said Colledge having heard, seen, 
and considered the haill declarations of the Witnesses, adduced against 
the saids Robert Warrander, William Moir, Patrick and John Ogilvies, 
Angus Sage, Keneth McKenzie, William Ord, and James Gatt, all 
Bursars and Students in the said Colledge, And being at length ryply 
and weele satisfyed theervvith, They find k proven That the said Robert 
Warrander published the forsd. proclamatione anent comitting of the 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 591 

King's picture to flames upon the first thursday of febry Last in the said 
Bonfyre put on by them at the said Colledge gate, And that the said 
Wm. Moir carried the said picture through the old toune on his Gun, 
And that the saids Robert Warrander, William Moir, Patrick and John 
Ogilvies, Angus Sage, Keneth McKenzie, and William Ord, Were all 
guilty art and part of the forsds disorders comitted by them the said 
day in the old toune and at the said Bonfyre, against his Majestic 
and the Government. And that the said Robert Warrander, Keneth 
McKenzie, William Ord, and James Gatt were all guilty of having 
harrangud in the publick schooll reflecting on the King and his Generalls, 
and in comendatione of the Pretender. As also the saids Masters having 
considered the Report made by the Subprincipall to them anent his 
taking a precognition against the sds Students Anent their invading the 
Minister of Old Abdn his house and comitting several dammages thcr, 
And invading Alexr. Taylor in Cotton his house, and taking away his 
armes. They by the sd report find the same likeways proven Against 
the sd Angus Sage, Keneth McKenzie, Patrick and John Ogilvies, as to 
the disorders comitted at the said Minister's house, And against William 
Moir, Angus Sage, Keneth M'Kenzie, and Patrick Ogilvie at Alcxr. 
Taylor's house. Therefore, the sds. Masters fyne and amerciat Ilk ane 
of the saids Robert Warrander, William Marr, Angus Sage, Patrick 
and John Ogilvies, Keneth McKenzie, and William Ord in the summe of 
fiftie merks Scots money for the use of the Bibliotheck of the sd 
Colledge, conforme to ane act of the Privie Counsell of Scotland dated 
the nynth of March 1693 years, And have Extruded and hereby extrud 
all the forenamed persons, as also the said James Gatt, furth and from 
the sd Colledge in all tyme comeing, And Declaires all of them Incapable 
of any benefice or Degree in the sd. Colledge hereafter, and ilk ane of 
their rexive Burses to be Vaccand, And farders the saids Masters ordains 
the dammages sustained by the said Minister extending to the summe of 
Scots money, and by the sd Alexr. Taylor extending 
to the summe of money forsaid to be payed to them 

out of what is resting of the sds. Burses. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



592 EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

AT King's Colledge of Aberdeen the first day of May J m vij c and 
sixteen years Conveened the Subprincipall, Civilist, Mediciner, 
Humanist, Mr. Burnet, regent, and Mr. George Gordon, Professor 
of the orientall Languages. 

The Masters and Members of the sd Colledge having heard, seen, 
and Considered the said John Hay his Confession And being at length 
ryply and weele advysed therwith, They find him Guiltie of such 
disorders and misdemeanorrs as render him incapable of exercising his 
office about the said Colledge. Therefore They have discharged and 
hereby discharge the said John Hay of his office of Janitor in the sd. 
Colledge, And depose him therefrom hereafter, And discharge him from 
mcdling thereanent any maner of way in time comeing. 

The Masters of the said Colledge having Considered the said John 
Day his Confessione They find That nether by his said confessione or 
the informatione they have gott, upon narrow enquiry anent him he is 
Guiltie of such disorders as deserve imediat deprivatione, And being at 
present destitute of a fitt servant for ordering the Colledge clock and 
attending their meetings (after having severely reprimanded him) for the 
present Did not think fitt to turn him out of his office Untill they be 
furder advysed in the matter. 

A. FRASER, Subprinll. 



AT the King's Colledge of Aberdeen the twcntie-second day of 
November J m vij m and seventeen years. In Presence of Mr. 
John Gordon, Provost of Aberdeen ; George Fordyce, James 
Moorisone, and Thomas Mitchell, Baillies of Aberdeen ; Mr. 
John Osborn, one of the Ministers of Aberdeen ; and Mr. Alexr. 
Mitchell, one of the Ministers of Old Aberdeen ; Mr. William 
Smith, the other Minister of Old Aberdeen. 

The said Day Compeared Mr. George Chalmers, late Minister at 
Kilwinning, And produced a Presentatione granted by his Matie to the 
said Mr. George Chalmers to be Principall of the King's Colledge of 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 593 

Aberdeen in place of Dr. George Middletone, Late Principal! of the said 
Colledge, dated the first day of October Last bypast, Which Presentatione 
was publickly read and a copie of the same is hereto subjoyned, As also 
the said Mr. George Chalmers Produced ane Extract of ane act of the 
Presbiterie of Aberdeen under the hand of Mr. James Smith, Presbiterie 
Clerk, bearing the said Mr. George Chalmers To have compeared before 
the said Presbiterie upon the twentie day of October instant, and 
subscribed the Confession of faith and formula as Law requires, which 
Extract was likeways read, After which Compeared the said Dr. George 
Middletone, Late Principal! of the said Colledge, And gave in a 
Protestation Against the Admissione of the sd Mr. George Chalmers 
as Principall forsaid subt. by him, Which was read, and a copy therof 
is hereto subjoyned, And thereupon took instruments. And the said 
Dr. George Middletone consented that the sd Mr. George Chalmers 
might give in his Answers thereto, And the sd Mr. George took 
instruments that he might answer the same accordinglic in writting. 
Thereafter Compeared Mr. John Gordon, Late Civilist in the sd. Colledge, 
And adhered to Dr. George Middlctone's Protestatione, And thereafter 
gave in a Protestatione, which was read, and thereupon took instruments, 
And required that the sd. Protestatione given in by him might be 
recorded in this minute, And the sd. Mr. George Chalmers Protested 
that the said Mr. John Gordon's Protestatione might not be recorded 
in respect it was extrinsick from the matter in hand, viz., the 
Admission of the sd Mr. George Chalmers as Principall forsd. All 
which being considered by the sd John Gordon and the other pcrsones 
beforenamed appointed by his Matic to admitt the said Mr. George 
Chalmers, They refused to allow the said Protestatione to be recorded 
in their present Minut In respect it mostlie concerned Alexr. Garden of 
Troup, Civilist of the sd Colledge, and the regents to be admitted, in 
which the meeting is noways concerned and not the matter in hand, But 
wer willing and instantlie offered to receave any objections he had to 
offer against the admissione of the sd George Chalmers. The forenamed 
Persones appointed by his Matie as Admitters forsaid haveing heard, 
seen, and considered the forsaid Presentatione granted by his Matie in 
favour of the said Mr. George Chalmers with the Exact of the said 
act of presbiterie, They did and hereby doe unanimously Admitt and 
Receave the said Mr. George Chalmers to his Imployment and place as 

A3 



594 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 



Principal! of the King's Colledge of Aberdeen and to the haill stipends, 
fees, profeits, emoluments, and casualities, with the whole power, Libertie, 
priviledges, and imunities belonging or knowen and accustomed formerlie 
to belong to the sd Principall's place in the termes of the said Presenta- 
tione in all points, Whereupon the said Mr. George Chalmers took 
instruments, And the saids Admitters appointed Alexr. Gordon, writter 
in Abdn, Colledge Clerk and Clerk to this present Meeting, to draw up 
the Admission of the said Mr. George Chalmers as Prinll forsaid formallie 
and authoritivelic in writting on stamped paper, which they declared they 
should subscribe when presented to them. 

Jo. OSBORN. JOHN GORDON. 

AL. MITCHELL. GEO. FORDYCE. 

WILLIAM SMITH. JA. MOORISON. 

THOMAS MITCHELL. 






AT the King's Colledge of Aberdeen the Twentie day of 

November J m vij c and seventeen years, In Presence of Mr. 
George Chalmers, Principall of the said Colledge ; Mr. Alexr. 
Fraser, Subprincipall ; Mr. David Anderson, Professor of 
Divinitie ; Mr. Alexr. Gordon, Humanist ; Mr. Alexr. Burnct, 
Regent ; and Mr. George Gordon, Professor of the orientall 
languages in the sd Colledge. 

The same day Compeared Mr. John Ker, and produced a Presenta- 
tione granted to him by his Matie to be one of the Regents in the said 
Colledge, dated the first day of October Last bypast, with the Extract 
of ane act of the Presbyterie of Abd. bearing the sd Mr. John Ker to 
have signed the Confession of faith and formula Conforme to Law, 
dated the twentieth day of Nover. instant, And thereupon the said 
Mr. John Ker craved to be admitted to his said office. 

As also Compeared Mr. Daniel Bradfut, And produced a presenta- 
tione granted to him by his Matie to be ane of the Regents in the said 
Colledge in place of Mr. Richard Gordon, Late Regent in the said 
Colledge, dated the first day of October Last bypast, With the extract 



EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 59$ 

of ane act of the presbiterie of Aberdeen bearing the sd Mr. Daniel 
Bradfutt to have signed the Confessione of faith and formula Conforme 
to Law, dated the twentieth day of Nover. instant, And thereupon the 
sd Mr. Daniel Bradfutt craved to be admitted to his said office. 

Thereafter Compeared Dr. James Urquhart and Mr. Richard Gordon, 
Late Regents in the said Colledge, And gave in the Protestation hereto 
subjoyned And thereupon took instruments, And the saids Mr. John 
Ker and Mr. Daniel Bradfutt Protested that they might have Libertic 
to answer the same, And thereupon took instruments, And the said Mr. 
George Chalmers, Prinll, Protested in name of the other Masters and 
himself that they might have Libcrtie to answer what concerned them, 
And thereupon took instruments. 

After all which the Principall Tendered the foundation oath and the 
oath de fideli to the saids Mr. John Ker and Mr. Daniel Bradfutt to their 
rexive offices as Regents in the said Colledge and haill emoluments and 
priviledges thereof during their naturall Lifetymes in the termes of the 
saids presentations granted by his matie in all points, And that in 
presence of the other Masters before named consenting, And thereupon 
they took instruments. And the Prinll appointed the Clerk to draw up 
the saids two admissiouns authoritivlic in writt on stamped paper, which 
he should subscribe when presented to him. 

This meeting was constitute and concluded by prayer. 

Gi:o. CHALMERS, Prinll. 



AT the King's College of Abdn the seventeenth day of Deer. 
jm v jjc an d seventeen years Conveened the Prinll, Mediciner, 
Subprinll, Humanist, Mr. George Gordon, and the three Regents, 
and Professor Andersone. 

Prayers Sayed. 

[Inter alia.] 

The which day the Prinll produced a Certificat under the hand of 
Mr. John McKenzie, prinll Clerk of Sessione, bearing that the sd prinll, 
Mr. Alexr. Garden of Troup, Civilist, and Mr. John Ker, Regent in the 
sd Colledge, did upon the twelveth day of Nover Last bypast Qualifie 



596 EXTRACTS FROM KING'S COLLEGE RECORDS, 1716. 

themselves to the King and Government conforme to Law in presence of 
the Lords of Counsell and Sessioun. With ane other Certificat on the 
foot thereof, under the hand of the sd. Mr. James [sic] McKenzie, that 
Mr. Daniel Bradfut, regent, did upon the threteinth day of the sd. 
moneth of Nover Last Oualifie himself in like maner to King and 
Government. 

GEO. CHALMERS, Prinll. 



KING'S COLLEDGE, March 2Qth J m vij c and eighteen, conveened the 
Prinll, Professor of Divinity, Subprinll, Humanist, Professor of 
Oriental languages, and three Regents, Mr. Ker Clerk pro 
tcmpore. 

[Inter alia.] 

The Prinll having produced a Letter to my Lord Forglen from five 
Ministers in favours of James Gatt, one of the Students who were 
extruded for their disloyall practices in the Time of the Rebellion, 
Which Letter has satisfied seall Members of the Commission as to that 
boyes loyal and discreet carriage ever since, and he being of a promising 
genius, The Masters allow him to receive degrees wt. the rest in Mr. 
Burnet's class. 

GEO. CHALMERS, Prinll. 



XXXIX. 
DECLARATION BY JAMES III., 1722. 

DECLARATION of James the 3rd King of England, Scotland, and 
Ireland to all his subjects of the three nations and to all 
sovereign princes and states to serve as a foundation for a lasting 
peace in Europe. 

JAMES REX, 

The obligation which we owe to our own honour and to the safety 
and tranquility of our own native country which above all tyes is the 
dearest and tenderest ; the steps which are too apparently taken to 
enslave our people the late unexampled violation of the freedom of 
elections by which the British Constitution is entirely subverted and a 
new sort of tyranny introduced, unknown to any other nation, con- 
spiracies invented on purpose to give pretence for new oppressions and 
to arm the nation against itself at a time when it was well known all 
attempts were imaginary and impracticable ; the Lives, libertys and 
fortunes of our subjects at the mercy of infamous informers cruelly 
exposed every day to subornation and perjury and every honest well 
meaning man in a state of proscription. 

These and many other considerations of the highest importance to 
the repose and security of our people exciting our compassion, have- 
engaged us to enter seriously into ourself to examine and consult our 
heart what sacrifice to make on our part for the publick peace and to 
consider earnestly of some method for restoring tranquility especially to 
these kingdoms of which we are the natural and undoubted Father. 

To express therefor and signify in the most publick maner our ardent 
desire to compose all differances and to avert all future evills that no 



598 DECLARATION BY JAMES III., 1722. 

blame may be now or hereafter imputed to us but that whatever calamitys 
should happen may be only and solely chargeable on the obstinacy or 
ambition of others. 

Wee declare that if the Elector of Hanover will deliver quietly to us 
the possession of our Kingdoms we will make no inquisitione of any 
thing thats past. Wee will acknowledge him in the same dignity of 
King in his states and dominions inviteing all other princes and states to 
do the same. We will live in Brotherly amity with him and contribute 
all our endeavours to establish him and his family in prosperity and 
Royal Grandeur where anc' uncontested Right will free him from the 
Cryme and reproach of Tyranny and usurpation and a quiet conscience 
make a crown sit easy on his head leaving at the same time his succession 
to our Dominion secure whenever in due cours his natural right shall take 
place. Let him compare a calm undisturbed reign over a willing and 
obedient people his natural born subjects with the restless unquiet 
possession of ane usurper in a strange land where authority forcing the 
inclinations of the people can only be supported by Blood rapine and 
violence eternally subject to fears and alarums even when no danger 
appears, for Guilt can never rest ; let him consider a Fixed and Solid 
establishment of Regal power in himself and his posterity exposed to no 
chance, with the fraill uncertain settlement of an usurped title which 
must and shall while we have breath and descendants in being be for 
ever disputed. 

Let him reflect that the divine Justice never faills sooner or later to 
chasten the oppressor and to redress the Innocent and injured ; in stead 
of advising with ane imperious ministry as much his Tyrants as the 
nationes. Let him consult his reasone, let him ask his conscience, let 
him examine his interest, and his glory, nay his very ambition will advise 
him to descend from a Throne which must be always shaking, to mount 
another where his seat will be firm and secure. 

Wee conjure all Christian princes and states to be aiding and assisting 
to enjoin this our just and amicable proposal whereby without the 
effusion of Blood or any national or publick disturbance justice may be 
done to ane injured prince and an equivalent provided sufficient to 
content an aspiring one. As a further inducement to all Christian 
powers to enter more heartily and deliberately into this important 
proposition wee offer ourselves to make good on our part all such 



DECLARATION BY JAMES III., 1722. 599 

allyances as have been already contracted with our kingdoms conducive 
to the peace and tranquility of Europe, and to enter into any new ones 
that may be judged necessary for the further strengthening and securing 
thereof. 

That there may likewise remain no objection from the fears and 
apprehensions of any one man in our dominions conscious of having 
offended against us, \vec promise a full free and universal pardon to all 
persons of whatever degree or condition within our realms without any 
exception who shall in any reasonable time return to their allegiance or 
by any act deed advice or otherways effectual! contribute to such a 
happy accommodation as may put a period to all our publick or private 
misfortunes that evry English man may hereafter live quietly under his 
own shade enjoy his conscience undisturbed and rest upon his pillow in 
peace. 

Wee protest solemnly before God and man that nothing can be 
proposed to us to make our kingdoms happy and flourishing and to 
quiet the minds of all men but we will strive with the most zealous to 
promote. 

Our desire is to embrace the whole body of our people without any 
distinction or reserve to root up the very seeds of prejudice and division 
that all marks of discord separation or difference of parties and all 
reproachfull denominations may be for ever extinguished and that the 
King and his people may have but one mind one heart and one interest. 
That humanity that Love of our country and that Goodwill . . . which 
we make the source of our actions prompt and incline us in the first 
place to the ways of mercy and peace. 

'Tis therefore that waiving all present application to sovereign powers 
who considering in Reality how much our cause is their own might 
readily be induced to aid us in vindicating that majesty which they 
behold oppressed and affronted in our person and sacrificing all resent- 
ments passion and desire of revenge to the publick good we now seek 
and condescend to shake hands with those who have most injured us. 

Given at our court at Lucca this present roth of Sept. 1722, and in 
the 2 ist year of our Reign. 



XL. 



MEMORIAL CONCERNING A CROSS ROAD FROM INVER- 

LOCHY, BY RUTHVEN OF BADENOCH, AND 

THROUGH BRAEMAR TO ABERDEEN. 



The present patent and fine Roads lately made from South to North 
thro' the most inaccessible Mountains in the Highlands of Scotland, not 
only evidence the Wisdom and Prudence of the Government, who gave 
direction and allowance for so great and laudable an Undertaking, but 
also very much redounds to the honour of his Excellency General Wade 
(the Executor of said useful work), for his Activity and Diligence. 

Which surprizing performance (never once thought practicable in 
former Ages) will justly eternize his Majesty's Name in that Kingdom. 

After the General had finished the several Roads from South to North 
he found (by experience) the same Nowise complete to answer the 
designed purposes of the Government, until there was a Cross Road 
made from East to West, through the middle of the Kingdom, and at 
that time was most wisely resolved that the same should be brought from 
Ruthven of Badenoch to Aberdeen, but came never to any determined 
Resolution about fixing the Way and Line, where it was to be drawn 
betwixt these two places, until rightly informed of the fittest for the 
public Utility and Profit. 

The Memorialist did at that time send a Representation to the 
General (of the Nature following) for his Excellency's better direction, 
that he might neither be misled, misinformed, or deceived by any Persons 
(maybe having Selfish Views) in a Matter of so great Importance, and 
whereon the Peace and safety of the whole United Nation so much 



ROAD FROM INVERLOCHY TO ABERDEEN. 6OI 

depended. But that design (by what reason I known not) was at that 
time entirely dropt. 

But since the laudable, useful, and I may say indispensible proposal 
of making the said cross Road from East to West is again revived, and 
that it is now propable the same will be put in Execution, is the occasion 
of renewing the former representation on that Subject with some additions 
and Amendments. 

The Grampians are a ridge of great Mountains that quite cross the 
Kingdom of Scotland, about the very broadest part, in almost a direct 
line from Inverlochy by Ruthven of Badenoch to Aberdeen. The 
inaccessibleness of these for want of fit passages and Roads, either 
across, or on each side of them, has at sometimes been a benefit to this 
Island in general. As for Example, in the Reign of Corbred the 2nd 
King of Scots, Agricola the Roman General had once and again defeated 
the United Power of both Scots and Picts, so that they were forced to 
betake themselves to the fastnesses and Strengths of these Grampians, 
which put a Stop to the Roman Legions, and happily impeded their 
making a Total Conquest of the British Island at that time, and had 
several times afterwards the same effects in frustrating the Expeditions 
of Adrian and Severus, who considering the Valour of their United 
Enemies, together with their advantage of their being possessed of such 
inaccessible ground, did never attempt to extend their Conquests be 
North the said Mountains. 

The Strengths of these grounds were also one considerable benefit 
and advantage to the Scots Nation. In particular in the Reign of 
Edward the I st , King of England, the same having very much and often 
retarded the progress of his Army, in his designed Total Conquest of the 
Scots Nation, the time of the long depending contest between the Bruce 
and the Baliol. 

But now since we have nothing to be afraid of that is Roman (except 
their pretended Catholic Religion), And that there is an incorporating 
Union now happily brought about betwixt the British Crowns, all the 
Advantages from such Natural Strengths does evanish. It next remains 
to be enquired into, how far in latter Ages these have contributed to the 
disquiet and frequent disturbance of the Kingdom. As also to be 
considered how prudent it would be still to leave them in the present 
inaccessible State. 

B 3 



6O2 MEMORIAL CONCERNING A CROSS ROAD 

After the total overthrow and extinction of the Pictish Nation, and 
the repeated expulsion of the Danes, there was nothing next to their 
almost perpetual Wars with England, that gave such disturbance to the 
Scotch Kings as the frequent Commotions and Insurrections of the 
Turbulent Highlanders and Borderers, to suppress which they were 
necessitate, to make frequent Expeditions in person, which sometimes 
proved fatal to those Princes, and very often fruitless, after considerable 
loss and charges, which did always terminate in the Utter devastation of 
the most of the Neighbouring Countries, tho' possessed by their Majesty's 
most loyal and peaceable Subjects. 

It was for this reason that Malcom the 3 rd , King of Scots, one of the 
wisest of their Princes, did build a Strong Castle in the Brae of Mar, in 
the very center of the Grampians, call'd the Castle of Kindrochit, and 
that out of pretext of a Summer Residence, for his diversion of Deer- 
hunting, but in effect to bridle the Stubborn disposition of the fierce and 
lawless Inhabitants, and more particularly the Stance of the said Fortress, 
was pitched upon as most necessary by reason of the inaccessibleness of 
that Country and its centrical Situation, which made it always remarkable 
for being the Commonplace of Rendezvous of the whole Turbulent and 
disaffected People of those parts, there being equal expeditious access to 
the same in some few Days from the several remotest Corners of the 
Highlands, and where they could rest securely, without fear of being 
attacked even by much superior Numbers, and the Inhabitants themselves 
by reason of their situation, were still amongst the first and last in Arms, 
in all Insurrections time out of mind. 

This Castle and Fortress of King Malcom's was of great use for many 
Ages, for keeping the peace of that and the Neighbouring Countries, until 
neglected and let out of repair in the Reign of King James the 5 th , and 
at last fell to total ruin and in Rubbish about the beginning of the Reign 
of K. James the 6 th . 

In the year 1628, the 3 (1 year of the Reign of King Charles the I st , 
John Erskine Earl of Mar, built a new Strong Castle (with Iron Gates 
and barr'd Windows) within a furlong of the Ruins of King Malcom's, 
designed for a hunting Seat for his family. This New Castle was together 
with the Castle of Inverlochy, Ruthven, and Inverness, Garrisoned by 
General Monk in the year 1651, about two years before Cromwell's 
Usurpation, and were continued for Nine Compleat Years until the 



FROM INVERLOCHY TO ABERDEEN. 603 

Restoration, which Garrisons, so bridled the Highlanders for that Space, 
that there was not the least Commotion, Insurrection, or Yea Depredation 
to be heard of, Nay further the Ordinary and then frequent oppressions, 
committed by Superiors and great ones upon their Vassals and Dependants 
were totally suppressed. 

It was generally acknowledged to be a great ommission and oversight 
at the time of the happy Restoration of the Royal Family, that these so 
useful Garrisons were evacuated and disused, which were found by 
experience not only to be a Curb to all disturbances of the Regnant 
Government, but a complete and sure hinderance to all Intestine Broils, 
Feuds and Depredations on the Low Countries, which soon turned 
frequent and even little noticed in the two first Reigns. 

At the time of the Revolution upon the Accession of K. William and 
Queen Mary to the Crown of these Realms, there was immediate Orders 
for planting Garrisons in the Highlands, and one in the foresaid Castle of 
Mar, among the first in obedience to which some Troops of Horse came 
to possess the same, until the Foot were advanced on their March within 
some few Miles of the place, should come up to be garrisoned there, but 
before their Arrival the Horse were defeat and dispossessed of the Castle 
for want of Provisions, by the Country Men quickly conveened in Arms, 
who were in the Interest of King James the 7 th , in opposition to the 
Revolution, and did upon their Victory put the Castle in Flames, to the 
very view and perception of the dispossessed, which answered their 
proposed design, in speedily freeing them of so troublesome a Garrison. 
This small piece of success so emboldened them, that they soon came to 
such a head that they proved too hard and Many for all the regular Force 
then in the North, and did March in a Body for 40 Miles in pursuit of 
them, until they got into the Town of Aberdeen, before which place the 
pursuers lay encamped for about a whole week, untill alarmed with the 
March of a Regular Army, under the Command of Gen 1 . Mackay. All 
this trouble and charge to the Government was much owing to the loss of 
the Castle of Braemar, and the Want of a Garrison in that place, which 
would have readily prevented any persons rising in Arrrn in these Countries 
at that time. 

It was not a little surprising to most Men, that his Maty King William, 
after the Reduction of the Highlands at that time did omit to repair and 
Garrison the said Castle of Braemar, the whole Vaults, Mason and Iron 



604 MEMORIAL CONCERNING A CROSS ROAD 

Work being entire (as it is still at this day) and nothing wanting but 
Roof, Josting and Flooring in a Country that abounds with Fir-wood and 
Slate. Such a small Charge to the Government would not have stood so 
many hundreds of Pounds, as the ommission and Oversight stood hundreds 
of thousands in suppressing the Rebellion and Insurrection in the year 
1715, which in all human probability would have been prevented, if there 
had been a standing and settled Garrison in that place. 

The late John Earl of Mar, came to that Country not only because it 
was his own, but by reason it was the fittest place in the Nation for his 
purpose, he lay secure from being attacked by any forces then in the 
North, considering his Situation in an inaccessible Country, where there 
was no roads fit for horse, and far less for wheel Carriages, Artillery and 
Provisions, &c. This central situation gave him the considerable advantage, 
that in a very few Days after his Arrival, he had full correspondence with 
the whole Potentates, Chieftans and other considerable Persons in the 
Highlands and Lowlands, be North the River Forth, and in less than a 
forthnight more he had them all either in Person or by his Emissaries at 
his head Quarters where they had time and Leisure not only to hatch a 
Rebellion, but to ripen and bring furth an Insurrection and Armament so 
formidable, that did not only over-run and overpower the most of the 
Scotch Nation, but did also penetrate near to the heart of England, and 
was not suppressed without a considerable supply of Forces from Foreign 
Nations. 

If the Castle of Braemar had been repaired as said is, and a Garrison 
continued in the same, as in former Ages, the Earl of Mar had never 
thought of coming to that Country, neither was there any other place in 
the Nation at that time fit for such a purpose, excepting Islands or very 
remote corners, where any small disturbances prestable in such places, 
could have been suppressed before they came to any head. 

And now since the Government has out of their great Wisdom 
penetrate through most of the Highlands, with patent and fine roads, and 
said to have determined that there be a Cross Road from East to West, 
from Ruthven in Badenoch to Aberdeen, it is obvious by the several 
recited Instances of so dangerous and destructive disturbances from so 
inaccessible a Country, in such a situation as the Brae of Mar, that it is 
the common Interest of the whole Island, as well as that of the Govern- 
ment (which are inseperable) that the said Road should come through 



FROM INVERLOCHY TO ABERDEEN. 605 

that Country, altho' it had chanced to be somewhat out of the direct line, 
and had even considerably advanced the charges and much more when it 
chances and falls to be the very nearest way. 

That Country being once laid open and made accessible by so patent 
Highways, does for ever hereafter disappoint all disaffected and Turbulent 
spirits of their so convenient old Natural Strength and place of Rendez- 
vous. Besides that the performance of the Road in this so reasonable 
and prudent shape, the same can lead to the Castle of Braemar, and it is 
the Memorialist's humble opinion absolutely necessary the same should 
be immediately repaired and made fit for a Garrison or Barrack which 
ever the Government think proper, whereas if the cross Road lead through 
any other Country, the thoughts of planting such Garrison or Barrack, 
behooved for ever to be laid aside, without a new unreasonable charge of 
a Second Road. 

There is just ground to believe that after perusal and mature con- 
sideration of this Representation and Memorial, it will remain no great 
Question (in the midst of such liberty and property as this Island 
presently enjoys beyond their Neighbours), but it will be determined 
prudent, to make every Corner of the Nation (and particularly this 
common seat of disturbance) accessible, not only for the benefit of 
Trade, and Expeditious Travelling of Forces, with their Artillery, 
Ammunition and Provisions, &c., when occasion shall require it, but 
also for speedy Access to Judges, Heraulds, Messengers at Arms, and 
Collectors of his Majesty's Revenues (all for the present next to im- 
practicable) which tends somewhat to the Dishonour, as well as much to 
the detriment and loss of this Kingdom. 

There is one other weighty Reason and Consideration, not as yet 
mentioned or taken notice of (which of itself) besides the many former 
convincing Arguments would be sufficient Motive for leading the said 
Road from East to West, and Garrisoning the Castle of Braemar as 
aforesaid, which is that now since the Familys of Gordon and Scaforth 
are happily converted from Popery, and consequently that Religion 
visibly upon the decline in their Countries, and most of the Northern 
Bounds. The Brae of Mar is the only remaining part of the Nation 
where Popery flourishes most, where there will be more than two hundred 
people hearing Mass all at once, and sometimes three or four Priests and 
Jesuits conveened together, with their Superior at their head, in full 



6o6 



ROAD FROM INVERLOCHY TO ABERDEEN. 



defiance of the Government and the Laws and disregarding the Ministers 
of the Established Church, whose pains to suppress them is fruitless, 
since by far the greatest part of the Commons are of the Roman Faith, 
and not to be forced into a decent and legal behaviour by the smaller 
number, and all this occasioned for want of a Garrison in the said Castle 
of Braemar, there being no Soldiers to be call'd for nearer than about 
40 Miles for suppressing such illegal and Tumultuous meetings. 

Upon the performance of the said cross Road and repairing the said 
Castle and Garrisoning thereof as is proposed it, would not only, forever 
bridle that, and the Neighbouring Countries, from being the Seat of any 
Insurrections and disturbances, but would effectually eradicate Popery in 
that Corner of the Nation in a few years, which would be easily performed 
by seizing or banishing those heaps of trafficking Priests, which seduce 
and pervert the poor Ignorant People, who in a little time would all come 
to Church if rid of, and permitted by their Turbulent Deceivers, who arc 
not (to be sure) slow in fomenting Rebellions in favour of the Popish 
Interest. 

P.S. The Castle of Braemar is the furthest place in Scotland from 
any Sea equally exact 40 Miles distant from Inverness, Elgin of Murray, 
Bamff, Aberdeen, Montrose, and Dundee, and two or three Miles nearer 
Perth, and about fifty Miles from Inverlochy. 

The Memorialist humbly submits to the Judgment of the present 
Wise Ministry, after their Mature Consideration of the many combined 
weighty Reasons above specified, whether yea or not it is prudent to 
leave a place so situate and inaccessible, without being Garrisoned and 
penetrated by the supposed cross Highway, and more particularly, when 
such cross Road is determined necessary however, and when it chances 
to be the most direct and nearest way between Ruthven of Badenoch and 
Aberdeen, And further to be noticed that the Charges to the Government 
will be much diminished by what is already performed and done towards 
the High Roads on the River Dee, and that the Castle of Braemar is 
already built and prepared with Iron Gates and Cross Iron barr'd 
Windows, and nothing to be done but the Roofing and repairing, to 
make it as fit for any Garrison or Barrack as any in the Highlands of 
Scotland. 






disregarding the Mii> 

f the ( < >r - of the Roman Faith, 

cent and legal behaviour by the smaller 

for want of a Garrison in the said Castle 

idiers to be callri for ' >i\n about 

<:gal and Tumultuous meeti 

i .said cross Road and repairing the said 

s is proposed it, would not only, forever 

ig Countries, from being the Seat of any 

wuld effectually eradicate Popery in 

years, which would be easily performed 

f trafficking Priests, which seduce 

:, \\l-o in'a little time would aH'come 

< their Turbulent Deceivers, who are 

'^ilioiii in favour of the Popish 



hc-t place in Scotland from 
Inverness, Elgin of Murray, 
' tu'o or three Miles nearer 

if. Judgment of the present 
don of the many combined 
, ca or not it is prudent to 
ihout being Garrisoned and 
and more particularly, when 
,,vever, and when it chances 
M Ruthven of Badenoch and 



at the Castle of Braemar is 
ites and Cross Iron barr'd 
e Roofing and repairing, to 
aj any in the Highlands of 



. . 




HENRY BENEDICT STUART 
CARDINAL YORK 




HENRY BENEDICT STUART 
CARDINAL YORK 



XLI. 

SPEECHES BY PRINCE CHARLES AND SIR JOHN COPE, 

1745- 

CHARLES PRINCE REGENT, 
His SPEECH TO His ARMY, 

When He began His March to meet General Cope at the Field near 
Ditdiston, September 2O th , 1745 ; 

The Prince being clothed in a plain Highland Habit, Cocked His 
Blue Bonnet, Drew His Sword, Threw away the Scabord, and Said, 

Gentlemen, Follow Me, By the Assistance of GOD, I will, this Day, 
make you a Free and Happy People. 

THE SPEECH of Sir John Cope, General of the Usurper's Army, a 
little before the Engagement, on Saturday the 2 I st September, 
1745, at Preston-Grange, Six miles East from Edinburgh; 

Gentlemen, You are just now to Engage with a parcel of Rable ; a 
parcel of Brutes, Being a small Number of Scots Highlanders, You can 
expect no Booty from such a poor despicable Pack. I have Authority 
to Declare, That you shall have Eight full Hours Liberty to Plunder and 
Pillage the City of Edinburgh, Leith, and Suburbs, (the Places which 
harbour'd and succour'd Them) at your Discretion, with Impunity. 



XLII. 



ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN, 1746. 



AN Authentic Account of the Battle fought between the Army 
under His Royal Highness The Duke of Cumberland and the 
Rebels, on Drmnmossie Muir, near Ciilloden, on the i6th 
April, 174.6. 

Edinburgh, April 23. 

By Letters from Inverness of the igth, which arrived this morning 
by one of the King's Messengers, we have the Confirmation of the 
glorious Victory obtained upon Wednesday the i6th, by the Army 
under the Command of his Royal Highness the Duke ef Cumberland, 
over the Army of the Rebels, on the Moor called Drummossie, near 
to Culloden, two miles from Inverness, with the following particulars : 

"His Royal Highness with the Army encamped the I5th at Nairn, 
and the Rebels hoping to surprise him there, marched within Three 
Miles of our Camp ; but upon Intelligence that our Drums were beating, 
in order to march to attack them, they retired to the Ground they had 
chosen to engage us in, which was a Moor near to the House of 
Culloden. 

" His Royal Highness marched thither the 1 6th, and came up with the 
Rebels about One Afternoon. The Action begun by the Fire of the 
Rebels' Cannon, which ours answered with Success, and very soon 
brought their first Line, Consisting altogether of their Clans, in a great 
Hurry to attack us. Their Right wing outfronted our Left, which fell 
in a little ; but our men fairly beat them back with their Bayonets, and 
made a great Slaughter of them. They made the same Movement on 
their Left ; but the Regiments on our Right, where His Royal Highness 



- OF CULLODEN, 1746. 

ittle fought between the Army 

u- Duke of Cumberland and the 

:K.ar Culloden, on the i6th 

Edinburgh, April 23. 

'.rh, which arrived this morning 

have the Confirmation of the 

the 1 6th, by the Army 

s the I>uke ef Cumberland, 

.1 called Drummossie, near 

.<th the following particulars: 

i-;ic;imped the 1 5th at Nairn, 

m 'J-'::i, marched within Three 

?hut <_'Ur Drums were beating, 

ictirixl to i he Ground they had 

?Ioor near to the House of 



i >n begun by the Fire of the 
'. with Success, and very soon 
Aether of their Clans, in a great 
\ outfronted our Left, which fell 
m back with their Bayonets, and 
y made the same Movement on 
<^ht, where His Royal Highness 




JAMES Mom OF STONEYWOOD. 



ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OK CULLODEN, 1746. 609 

was, did not take their Firelocks from their Shoulders, tho' the Rebels 
came down firing their Pistols and brandishing their Swords, three times, 
within less than one hundred yards, yet they dared not to attack us, but 
went off without attempting any Thing. The Rebels looked upon them- 
selves as quite covered on their Right wing by the Walls of a Park ; but 
the Generals Hawley and Bland, with that part of our Cavalry that was 
posted on our Left, got through these Walls, by the Assistance of the 
Campbells, who made several Openings for them, and attacked their 
Right vving, and made great Slaughter ; and at the same time the Horse 
from our Right attacked their Left flank, so that our Cavalry met in 
their Centre. By this Time (which was not Half an hour from the first 
firing of the Cannon) they were quite routed, and the Horse had Orders 
to pursue, which they did for above Three Miles, with great Execution. 
The Rebel Prisoners say they lost on the Field and in the Pursuit above 
4000 Men. We have 222 French and 326 Rebels Prisoners, besides 
Officers. We took 12 Cannon, a great Deal of Ammunition, and about 
2400 Firelocks. Our Loss was 50 Officers and Soldiers killed, and 250 
wounded. Lord Kilmarnock and some other Officers of Note are taken, 
and many of the Highland Chiefs are killed. This great event, under 
God, is entirely the Work of his Royal Highness. The Disposition and 
ordering the Execution of it was all his own. To-Day Lord Cromarty 
and his Son, with Ten other Officers, and 150 men, taken by the Suther- 
land Militia, were brought into Inverness aboard the Hound Sloop." 

And by private Letters of the same date, but wrote after making up 
the respective Lists mentioned below, it appears that more Prisoners 
were hourly brought in. In one of which it is said : " Just now 30 of 
Fitz-James's Horse, and 30 of Lord John Drummond's, with Five French 
Officers, have come and surrendered themselves, so that now 50 French 
Officers have surrendered ; 39 Rebels are just brought in from different 
Places." 



EXTRACT of a Letter from an Officer in the Army to his friend at 
Edinburgh, dated the i8th. 

His Royal Highness the Duke, by the Blessing of the Almighty, has 
beaten the Rebels upon the Muir of Culloden, and got the cheapest 

C3 



6lO ACCOUNT OF THE JiATTLE OF CULLODEN, 1746. 

Victory that perhaps has ever been known, tho' by his exposing his own 
valuable Person too much, it had often like to cost us too dear ; a 
Battery of their Cannon bore directly upon the Place where he stood ; it 
did little Execution, for a particular Providence guards him, and he 
trusts to it ; several shots nearly missed him, and one shot took off two 
Men exactly before him. The Action began at one o'clock, and lasted 
but a short Space in any kind of warmth ; they shifted .away to our 
Left, but with all the bravest of their Men they could not make any 
Hand of one single Regiment, which was Barrel's ; their great Effort 
was there, but it was vain, they could not penetrate, and lay in Heaps. 
In a Word we have not lost 100 Men, and the Rebels have lost between 
3500 and 4000. We took all their Cannon, which were Twelve, their 
Ammunition, 30x30 Stand of Arms, Magazines of Beef and Oatmeal, &c. 

And a Letter of the same Date from another Officer makes the 
following Observations on that memorable Action : 

" I can scarce think they will ever venture to look our People in the 
Face again, after the Reception they met with. They were above 9000 
strong, chos'd their Ground, and had likewise a rainy Day to favour their 
Broad Swords, but all would not do ; and what is still more, our Front- 
line only engaged, which shows you what our People can do. They are 
now thoroughly convinced that Highlanders and Broad Swords signify 
little against us. Indeed they had the warmest Fire given them that I 
ever saw for the Time it lasted, and this was the third Field-battle I have 
been in, in less than a Twelvemonth. 

" All Accounts agree in ascribing the Success of this glorious 
Engagement, under God, wholly to the Conduct and Valour of His 
Royal Highness the Duke, who, as some of the Letters express it, 
' Behaved as if he had been inspired, constantly riding up and down 
giving his own Orders.' And what thanks do we not owe to Almighty 
God for giving us so great a Deliverance, and preserving that glorious 
young Hero, whom he made the Instrument of delivering us." 

We have also Advice by other private Letters that the following 
Ladies are made Prisoners, viz. : Old Lady Macintosh, Lady Macintosh 
younger, Lady Ogilvy, the Lady of Sir James Kinloch of Nevy, and 
Lady Gordon. 



ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OK CULLODEN, 1746. 



fill 



A Return of i/te Rebel Officers and Soldiers now Prisoners in 
Inverness, iQth April, 1746. 

Men's Xawfs. 
Lord Kilmarnock 
Francis Farquharson 
James Stewart 
- MacLachlan 
John Farquharson* ^ 
Duncan Macgregor 
Sir John Wedderburn 
Andrew Wood 
Alexander Cumint 
George Lauder ' 
John Kattray Jr 
John Findlason' 
Andrew Spruel 
James Lindsey 
James Hay 
Nairn ; ; 
George Law ,' 
George Gordon 
Alexander Buchanan 
Donald Ferguson 
Roger Macdonald 
John MacDonald 
George Adison 
Donald MacQueen 
Donald Levistonc 
William Walker 
Alexander Smith 
Thomas Armstrong 
James Drummpnd 
Donald Fraser 
Andrew Smith 
John Gollon 
Andrew Catanoch 
Alexander Thomson 
George Gordon 
Alexander Macintosh 
John Sim 
Alexander White 
James MacKenrie 
Alexander Davidson 
Lachlan Macintosh 



Station. 


RfgOHtHt, 


County. 


Colonel 




Stirlingshire. 


Colonel 




Aberdeenshire. 


-Major 


Duke of Perth's 


do. 


Colonel 




Inverness-shire. 


Captain 


Colonel Farquharson's 


Al>erdeenshire. 


Ensign 


do. 


do. 


Life Guards 


Elcho's 


Angus. 


Captain 


John Roy Stewart 


Glasgow. 


Captain 


Duke of Perth's 


Perthshire. 


Surgeon 




Edinburgh. 


Surgeon 




do. 


Engeneer 


Artillery 


do. 


Captain 


Pitsligoe's 


Glasgow. 


Ensign 


Lord Strathallan's 


Perthshire. 


Ensign 


Pitsligoe's 


Aberdeenshire. 


Deputy Paymaster 




Edinburgh. 


Chaplain 


to the Pretender 


Aberdeen. 


Lieutenant 


Glenbucket's 


Perthshire. 


Captain 


Duke of Perth's 


do. 


Serjeant 


do. 


do. 


Private 


Clan Ronald's 


Skye. 


do. 


do. 


Inverness-shire. 


IJawman 


Pitsligoe's 


Aberdeen. 


do. 


do. 


Argyleshire. 


Private 


Ardshiel 


Argyleshire. 


do. 


Colonel Crighton 


Aberdeenshire. 


do. 


Lord Ogilvie's 


Angus. 


do, 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Duke of Perth's 


Perthshire. 


do. 


Master of Lovat s 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


Colonel Crighton 


Al>erdeenshire. 


do. 


do. 


Inverness. 


do. 


Stunnywood's 


Aberdeen. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do.' 


Colonel Macintosh 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Macintosh 


do. 


do. 


Colonel MacGiliavrae 


do. 


do. 


Colonel Farquharson 


Aberdeenshirc. 


do. 


Colonel Macintosh 


Inverness-shire. 



6l2 



ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN, 1746. 



Jftn's Aaww. 


Station. 


Regiment. 


County. 


Robert Grant 


Private 


Lord Lewis Gordon 


Abcrdcenshire. 


Andrew Mill 


do. 


Colonel Crighton 


do. 


John MacAndrew 


do. 


Colonel Farquharson 


do. 


John Maclntire 


Bawman to the 




Argyleshire. 




Pretender 






Alexander Cameron 


Private 


Lochell 


Inverness-shire. 


Andrew Geddes 


do. 


Lord Ogiivie 


Bamffshire. 


Charles Graham 


do. 


Glengary 


Ross-shire. 


John Morison 


do. 


Sir Alexander Bannerman 


Bamffshire. 


John Mason 


do. 


Stonnywood . ' 


Aberdeenshirc. 


William Trail 


do. 


Lord Ogilvie's 


Bamffshire. 


Alexander Campbell 


do. 


Duke of Berwick's 


Inverness-shire. 


Alexander Young 


do. 


Duke of Berwick's 


Inverness-shire. 


John Smith 


do. 


Lord Ogilvie's , 


Angus. 


William Grant 


do. 


John Roy Stewart's . 


Inverness. 


IJugwal MacLeod 


do. 


Clan Ronald's 


do. 


William Monro 


do. 


do. 


Inverness-shire. 


David Crab 


do. 


John Roy Stewart's 


Mid-Lothian. 


Lachlan MacLean 


do. 


do. 


Argyleshire. 


John Beverly 


do. 


Stonnywood's 


Aberdeen. 


Uugwal Mackenzie 


do. 


do. 


Inverness. 


William Roy 


do. 


John Roy Stewart 


Lanark. 


John MacLachan 


do. 


Colonel MacLauchlan 


Argyleshire. 


John MacBain 


do. 


do. 


Inverness-shire. 


James Gordon 


do. 


Glenbucket's 


Banffshire. 


William Farquharson 


do. 


do. 


do. 


[anies Middleton 


do. 


do. 


do. 


John MacLachlan 


do. 


do. 


do. 


John MacDonald 


do. 


do. 


do. 


\Villiam Fraser 


do. 


Master of Lovat 


Inverness-shire. 


( leorge Forbes 


do. 


Abbochy 


Aberdeen. 


James Campbell 


do. 


do. 


Inverness. 


Hugh MacKenzic 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Donald Cameron 


do. 


Lochyel 


Inverness-shire. 


lohn Guissock 


do. 


Abbochy 


Aberdeenshire, 


John MacLean 


do. 


do. 


Argyleshire. 


Hugh Fraser 


do. 


Lord John Drurmnond's 


Inverness-shire. 


James Ronaldson 


do. 


Sir Alexander Bannerman 


Aberdeenshire. 


Donald Ross 


do. 


Stonnywood's 


do. 


William Robertson 


do. 


Duke of Athol 


Perthshire. 


William Couts 


do. 


Colonel Farquharson 


Aberdeenshire. 


Donald MacRea 


do. 


do. 


Sutherland. 


Malcolm Stewart 








Servant to Col. Stewart 






Argyleshire. 


John MacAurie 


Private 


Colonel Farquharson 


do. 


Thomas Gillespie, a Boy 


do. 


Colonel Warrant 


.Mid -Lothian. 



ACCOUNT OK THE BATTLE OK CULLOUliN, 1746. 



6l 3 



Jfcti's .Values. 
Walter Gordon 
John Airth 
Angus MacDonald 
James DavidscA 
Donald MacLe$n 
John MacDonahl 
John Heggans 
John MacDougal 
Lord John Drummond's 

Piper's Servant 
John MacDonald 
Robert Mackay 
Thomas Nairn 
John Buchanan 
William Durrat 
Duncan Catanach 
George Murdoch 
Archibald Colquhoun 
John MacLearf 
John MacLean 
Duncan Stewart 
John Smith 
Archibald MacUonald 
Donald Sutherland 
William Macintosh 
Robert Johnston 
Francis Macintosh 
Malcolm Masterton 
John MacKcnzie 
John Kennedy 
William Chisholm 
Archibald Cameron 
Alexander Macl^eod 
Farquhar MacGillnvrea 
James Drummond 
Donald Grant 
Alexander Morison 
Alexander Duncan 
Donald Ross 
Lauchlan Ritchie 
James MacPherson 
William MacKenzie 
Andrew Mouchall 
John Grasick 
John Gray, a Native of France, come 

Express from the French Kint; 



Station. 


Regiment. 


County. 


Life Guards 


Lord Elcho 


Mid-Lothian. 


Private 


Colonel Crighton's 


Aberdecnshire. 


do. 


Glengary's 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Lochyel 


Argyleshirc. 


do. 


Glengary's 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


Lord John Drummond's 


Lanerk. 






Inverness-shire. 


Private- 


Colonel Chisholm's 


do. 


do. 


Ablx)chy 


Sutherland. 


do. 


Glen bucket's 


Aberdeenshire. 


do. 


do. 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


Colonel Farquharson. 


Aberdeenshire. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Appin's 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Colonel MacLean's 


do. 


do. 


Appin's 


do. 


do. 


Colonel Farquharson 


do. 


do. 


Clan Ronald 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


do. 


Sutherland. 


do. 


Master of Lovnt 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


Sir Alexander IJanncrman 


Mearns. 


do. 


Colonel MacGillavrea 


Inverness-shire. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Keppoch 


do. 


do. 


Colonel Chisholm 


do. 


do. 


Lochyel 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


Colonel MacGillavrea 


do. 


do. 


Lord Lewis Drummond 


do. 


do. 


< llengaiy's 


do. .- 


do. 


Colonel MacLcan 


ArgylesJiirc. 


do. 


Master of Loval 


Inverness-shirt. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 


do. 



614 



ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OK CULLODEN, 1746. 



Men's A'arttes. 
Dougal Soutor 
Angus Campbell 
Jascol Mackay 
Murdoch Cameron 
Allan Stewart 
John MacRobbie 
William Anderson 
Duncan Campbell 
John Robertson 
John Buchanan 
Archibald Maclnnes 
Thomas Kraser 
Jan Boy 

John MacDonakl 
Niel MacGoary 
John Sim 
Evan MacKenzic 
John Ferguson 
George Merry 
Evan MacCulloch 
William Chisholm 
John MacDowgall 
David Ramsay 
lohn N'icol 



Station. Regiment. County. 

Private Keppoch Mid-Lothian 

do. Master of Lovat Inverness-shire. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. f do. 

do. Airdsheil's Perthshire. 

do. Duke of Perth's do. 

do. Lord Ogilvie's Angus. 

do. Lochyel Argyleshire. 

do. Keppoch Perthshire. 

do. Airdshiel Argyleshire. 

do. do. do. 

do. Master of Lovat Inverness-shire. 
A Native of France Fit/. James's 

Private Clan Ronald Inverness-shire. 

do. Master of Ix>vat do. 

do. Lord Nairn's Perthshire. 

do. Master of Lovat Inverness-shire. 

do. Lord George Murray Perthshire. 

do. do. Aberdeenshire. 

do. Airdsheill Argyleshire. 

do. Col. Chisholm Inverness- shire. 

do. Clan Konnnld Argyleshire. 

do. Stonnywood Angus 

do. Lord Ogilvy do. 



XLIII. 

DECLARATION OF THOMAS THEODORE DEACON 

SENTENCE OF DEATH). 



Deluded Mr. Maclox, who has added the sin of unparralcd ingratitude 
to those of Treachery to his Fellow-subjects, perfidiousness to his lavvfull 
Prince, and perjury against God, having sworn away the very lives of 
those Persons who chiefly supported him while he attended on the 
Princes army and for a moneth after he was taken Prisoner. And 
further I affirm on the word of a Dying man that he pcrjur'd himself 
against me at my Tryall, as I verily beleve he did most if not all the 
rest. Lastly I most freely forgive my two principall enimys, the Elector 
of Hanover and his son, who claims the pretended tittle of Duke of 
Cumberland, who are actually guilty of murder in putting me with many 
others to Death affter the latter had granted a formall and regular 
Capitulation in writting, which is directly contrary to laws of God and 
Nations, and I hope will be a Sufficient warning to all those who shall 
have spirrit, honesty and Loyalty enough to take up arms in Defence of 
their lawful! Sovereign King James the 3rd or any of his Successors 
against the U - r [usurper] and his Defendants : I say I hope it will 
be a sufficient warning never to surrender to Hanoverian mercy, but to 
Dye bravely with swords in their Hands. Not but that I submit with 
the utmost chearfullness and tranquillity to this violent Death, being 
thoroughly convinced that I shall be of much mor service to my beloved 
Country and fellow-subjects, as well as my own lawfull King My Dear 
brave Prince of Wales and the Duke (whom God of his infinite mercy 
bless, preserve, and restore) than all the good I could do by fighting in 
the field or any other way. I publickly profess that I heartily repent of 
all my Sins, But I am so far from thinking the fact for which I Dye one 



6l6 DECLARATION OF THOMAS THEODORE DEACON. 

of them that I think I shall thereby become an honour to my family, 
and if I had ten thousand lives would chearfully and willingly lay them 
down in the same cause. And here I solemnly affirm that malicious 
report to be false and groundless, which hath been raised merely with 
design to involve my relations in inconveniences, viz : That I engaged in 
this affair through their Persuasion, instigation, and even compulsion ; 
on the contrary I always determined to embrace the first opportunity of 
performing my Duty to my Prince, which I did without consulting or 
being advised to by any friend upon Earth. And now my Dear 
countrymen I have nothing more to say but to advice you to return to 
your Duty before it be too late and before the nation be entirely ruined, 
compare the patcrnall and tender affection which our King has always 
showed to his native country with the rashness of the Usurper and his 
great regard to his German Dominions, the Interests of which he has 
always prefer'd to that of England ; compare the extraordinary clemency 
and humanity of the ever glorious Prince Charles with the horrid bar- 
baritys and crueltys of the Elector's Son which he perpetrated in 
Scotland. Remember what solemn promises have been given by our 
King and Prince Charles to protect in the enjoyment of your laws, 
Religion, and liberties ; lias not the Prince thrown himself into your 
arms and has he not given .sufficient Prooff of his abilitys in the Cabinet 
as well as bravery in the field ; In fine he has done his part, and the sin 
must ly at your door if you do not yours. May God be pleased to bless 
this land and be graciously pleased to open the eyes of the People that 
they may Discern their Duty and true interest and assist in restoring 
their onley natural! King to his indisputable Just right : Bless, prosper, 
and guide him in all his undertakings. So prayeth Thomas Theodorus 

Deacon. 

Lord have mercy upon me. 
Christ have mercy upon me. 
Lord have mercy upon me. 
Lord Jesus receive my soul. 



XLIV. 

PETITIONS BY PATRICK STEWART AND ROBERT 
MAXWELL, 1746-7. 

To his Grace His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State, the humble 
petition of Patrick Stewart under conviction for High Treason. 

Humbly Sheweth. 

That your Graces Petitioner being forced by the late Marquess of 
Tullibardine as living in the Duke of Atholes ground to go out with the 
rebels in August 1745, in a few days after he deserted them as he did 
several times after but was retaken. That in April 1746, he surrendered 
himself to the Rev. Mr. Alexander Stewart, minister of Blair in Athole, 
but in regard of a dryncss previously subsisting between him and the 
minister he would give him no certificate but ordered him to return to 
his house and live peaceably which he did until the end of July that he 
was taken up by some of the military and sent prisoner to Carlisle. 

That at trial he threw himself upon his Majesty's mercy by pleading 
guilty, but was indulged the privilege of getting his evidence taken upon 
the above facts who distinctly proved his being forced out, desertion and 
surrender which induced the court to recommend him to his Majesty for 
mercy and thereupon he was reprieved. 

That the 27th ult. he was brought from Carlisle with other prisoners 
and a proposal was made to him to enlist in the East India Independent 
Companies, which he declined as his surrender was equally good on his 
part as if he had obtained a Certificate and that such as got Certificates 
were requit at Tryal tho' their cases were no wayes so favourable as 
the above. 

May it therefore please your grace to consider the Petitioners Case 
and to indulge him the benefit of his said surrender the evidence 
whereof is in your graces hands and your Petitioner shall ever 

pray. 

(Signed) PAT: STEWART. 
Bishops Hartfield, i3th Oct., 1746. 



6l8 PETITIONS BY PATRICK STEWART 

To his Grace His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State. The 
Petition of Robert Maxwell. 

Humbly Sheweth. 

That on 27th ult. your petitioner was brought off from Carlisle with 
other Rebel prisoners by Captain Gordon of H.M. Independent Company 
for the East Indies and a Kings Messenger, tho his name is not expressed 
in the warrant which the Petitioner copied, or any discretionary power 
contained therein. That Mr. Gordon proposed to the Petitioner to enlist 
in the foresaid service, which he declined for the following reasons: 
ist. The Petitioner is advanced in age and very grey headed and infirm, 
being upwards of 50 years. 2nd. By a long course of sickness and bad 
usage in Carlisle Castle he is infected with scrofolus humors and wants the 
proper use of one of his arms, and besides has a numerous small family 
that in such event must starve or beg. 3rd. The Petitioner had been 
acquit at Tryal, as nine others more deeply concerned in the late wicked 
rebellion were, had not Mr. Bruce, a doer for the Crown, kecped back the 
Certificate until he was condemned. His genuine case being that after the 
battle of Falkirk (being an Attorney at law and well known in figures and 
book-holding) he was forced to go along as a rebel commissarys Manuensis, 
and to keep the account of the forage ; he never wore their habits or arms. 
That within the time limited by the Duke of Cumberland's Proclamation 
he surrendered to the Lord Justice Clerk at Edinr., and was allowed 
freedom till the 6th August 1746 ; that he was sent of with the rebel 
prisoners to Carlisle, and had not time to get his Certificate with him, 
but his lordship sent it to Mr. Bruce, who used it as above. But how 
soon it was got Baron Parker, dissatisfied with such conduct, took a copy 
of the certificate and of a Petition to his Majesty both in your Graces 
custody, and engaged to represent the case to his Majesty, which he did, 
and received a favourable answer, which he signified by a missive to the 
Petitioners Solicitor at Carlisle, and soon after his Reprieve followed. 

That the Petitioner is sensible that Mr. Bruce has done him much 
harm, tho great persons has done their utmost on his behalf, and he 
humbly hopes that as his surrender as every whit as solemn and his case 
more favourable than many acquit at trial, he will now be allowed the 
like benefit after he and his family has miserably suffered by malice. 



AND ROBERT MAXWELL, 1746-7. 619 

The Petitioner did presume to write your grace to the same purpose 
since he was brought off, but has reason to think or suspect that it was 
suppressed before it reached the Post Office, and he hopes his case will 
plead his excuse for this trouble, as its said he is to be carried directly 
hence for Portsmouth without seeing London. 

May it therefore please your Grace with compassion to consider the 
Petitioners case, and to issue such speedy orders concerning him 
as to your Grace in your Christian Wisdom shall see proper, and 
your Graces Petitioner shall ever pray. 



(Signed) ROBERT MAXWELL. 



Bishops Hartfield, I3th Oct., 1747, 
from a stable. 



XLV. 
PETITION BY FARQUHARSON OF BALMORAL, 1748. 



UNTO the Kings most Excellent Majesty the Petition of James 
Farquharson 

Most Humbly Sheweth 

That, in the month of October 1745, your Petitioner, who till then 
lived quiet and peaceable at his own house in the County of Aberdeen, 
was unhappily induced to join in the late Rebellion at the instigation of 
an elder brother whom he had still regarded as a parent. 

That your Petitioner is informed upon this account he is excepted 
from your Majesty's gracious act of Indemnity and that ane Inditement 
has been lately found against him before a Grand Jury at Edinburgh for 
High Treason. 

That your Petitioner begs leave with the greatest humility to represent 
to your Majesty that from the time of his appearing in arms in the latter 
end of October 1745, it was his constant care to the utmost of his power 
to prevent distresses to your Majesty's faithful subjects and to protect 
them from injury in their persons and estates, and particularly those who 
had the misfortune to fall into the hands of the Rebells, as many of them 
can, and the Petitioner believes will testify when called upon. 

That in the beginning of February thereafter your Petitioner retired 
home again to his own country, and has ever since lived in such a manner 
as not to give the smallest offence. 

That your Petitioner is now advanced to a considerable age, and his 
health impaired by the many hardships and distresses which he has 
suffered. 

That your Petitioner has presumed to mention these circumstances 
not as ane alleviation of his guilt, but in order to move your Majesty's 
compassion, and being heartily sorry for his offence, he most humbly 



PETITION BY FARQUHARSON OF BALMORAL, 1748. 62 1 

submitts himself to your Majesty's Royal clemency and imploring your 
Royal mercy, promises for the future to live a grateful and dutiful 
subject. 

And your Petitioner shall ever pray. 

21 Novr. 1748. JAMES FARQUHARSON. 

ii. 

We subscribers, the Moderator and Ministers of the Presbytery of 
Alford, being informed that ane indictment for high treason committed 
in the year 1745 has lately been found before a Grand Jury at Edinburgh 
against James Farquharson of Balmoral, who has resided for many years 
past in our neighbourhood, and whose character is well known to us, do 
think ourselves bound in justice and out of regard to truth, to certify 
of that unfortunate gentleman, as follows : That his conduct before 
engaging in the late unnatural Rebellion was very agreeable to the rules 
of humanity and morality, remarkable for benevolence, friendship, and 
hospitality ; that after the Rebellion broke out in August and September, 
1745, Mr. Farquharson did nevertheless continue peaceable and quiet at 
his own house till Octr., 1745, when we have been informed he was called 
up to Edinr. by his elder brother, who then resided there, and at his 
instigation was induced to join in the Rebellion. That even before and 
after this wicked and unhappy step Mr. Farquharson disswaded others 
from following his wicked and bad example. That during the violence 
that then prevailed he still retained his humanity and other social virtues, 
and gave signal proofs thereof in his mild and discreet behaviour to, and 
protection of some of us and (as we have been well informed) of our 
brethren in other places, from the dangers to which our loyalty to His 
Majesty did then expose us, and shewed all the kindness and did all the 
services in his power to severall of his Majesty's faithful subjects, our 
countrymen, and acquaintances who were taken prisoners by the Rebells, 
and that we never heard of his exacting, levying money, arms, or horses, 
or otherwise distressing any of his Majesty's loyal subjects. That in the 
beginning of February he left the Rebel Army and never joined them 
again, but returned to our country, where he remained perfectly quiet 
and peaceable, without giving the least disturbance or offence to any. 
That being in a very bad state of health, and considerably advanced in 
years, he has suffered a great deal in his person from the hardship and 



622 PETITION BY FARQUHARSON OF BALMORAL, 1748. 

distresses to which he has been exposed. Notwithstanding whereof he 
has to the best of our knowledge and information behaved himself with 
the greatest decency and submission, and neither by word or action gave 
the least ground of offence we ever heard of ; which, together with his 
obliging, generous disposition before he ingaged in the Rebellion, has 
recommended him not a little to the kindness and sympathy of the real 
and sincere friends of the Government in our bounds ; to all whom we 
are certain it would give the greatest pleasure should this misfortunate 
gentleman be added to the many others who have shared in the Royal 
clemency. And we (being sensible of the truth of these facts, and 
firmly perswaded that for the future he will prove a dutiful and grateful 
subject to his Majesty, and an agreeable member of society in our 
country), have thought fit to make this certificate to the end that a just 
representation thereof may be laid before his most sacred Majesty and 
his Ministry : 

(Signed) PAT: THOMSON, Minister at Tough, Moderator. 

PAT REID, Minister at Clatt. 
THEODORE GORDON, Minister at Kenethmt. 

JAMES LUMSDEN, Minister at Towie. 
JOHN LUMSDEN, Minister at Strathdon. 

JOHN MAXWELL, Minister at Auchindoiir. 

WAL. SYME, Min r at Tullienesle. 

ALEX STRACHAN, at Keig. 

THO: REID, Minr a t Leochel. 

ALEX JOHNSTON, Min r at Alford. 

ALEXR. OREM, Min r at Forbes. 
WILL MlLN, Minister at Kildrumie. 

III. 

Another certificate in the same language was signed by the Moderator 
and Ministers of the Presbytery of Kincardine O'Neil, viz.: George 
Campbell, Moderator ; Will McKenzic, Min r at Glenmuick ; Ale r Garden, 
Min r at Birse ; Franc: Dauney, Min 1 at Lumphanan ; William Abel, 
Min r at Kincardine ONeal ; Alex Garioch, Min r at Midmar ; Ro: Michie, 
Min r at Cluny ; John Mclnnes, Min r at Coldstane ; James Paterson, 
Min 1 at Coull ; Jno: Shepherd, Min r at Tarland ; and George Shepherd, 
at Aboyne. 



PETITION BY FARQUH ARSON OF BALMORAL, 1748. 623 

IV. 

I, Charles Maitland, Advocate, certify that in the time of the late 
rebellion I was taken prisoner by the Rebels, and with other prisoners 
came under a guard from Aberdeen to Perth ; that we past by Dundee, 
where James Farquharson of Balmoral had the command ; that the said 
James Farquharson did not only use the prisoners with humanity and 
tenderness, but did everything in his power to relcave and assist us, and 
wrote letters to the Commanders of the Rebels at Perth, applying in the 
strongest and most urgent manner for the liberation of the prisoners. 
This I attest to be truth. CTIAS. MAITLAND. 

London, Dec. i8th, 1748. 

v. 

I, Mr. John Chalmers, Principal of the King's College of Aberdeen, 
do hereby certific and declare that I was detained prisoner by the Rebels 
from the day of December 1745, till the beginning of February 

thereafter ; that being carried prisoner in company with several gentle- 
men and others from Aberdeen to Dundee, Perth, and Stirling, I was in 
company of James Farquharson of Balmurle, who had the command of 
the Rebels at Dundee for a whole evening, and the greatest part of next 
forenoon. 

That the prisoners upon that occasion were treated by him with 
uncommon discretion and humanity. That I never heard of his exacting 
money or taking horses or arms from any of his Majesty's subjects. 
That I heard him at great length and in very strong terms express his 
detestation against all the violent measures and lawless exactions of the 
rebels. 

That he declared at that time that it was entirely contrary to his 
advice and inclination to detain or harass any prisoners. That in 
consequence of this he wrote along with the prisoners a very pressing 
letter to Lord Strathallan, who commanded the rebels at Perth, advising 
him to dismiss us, and I remember the reason he gave for it was that 
some of the prisoners had done nothing for which they could be punished 
by any law then in being ; even supposing that they, the rebels, should 
succeed, he thought it both idle and cruel to harass or detain them. 

That I was likewise well assured that he afterwards in person insisted 
very strongly both at Perth and at Stirling to have the prisoners released. 



624 PETITION BY FARQUHARSON OF BALMORAL, 1748. 

That as far as I have heard he has behaved with great submission since 
the Rebellion was over, and I have been assured by a great many who 
conversed with him that he has all along expressed a just sense of the 
clemency and mildness of the Government. 

As I am persuaded that he will for the future prove a most grateful 
and dutiful subject, 1 think myself obliged in justice to attest the truth 
of the above facts, that a proper representation thereof may be laid 
before his most sacred majesty. (Signed) Jo. CHALMERS. 

VI. 

I, James Patcrson, Wryter in Stirling, late Sheriff-Depute of Stirling- 
shire, [hearing] that ane indictment for high treason committed in the 
year 1745 has been found before a Grand Jury at Edinburgh against 
James Farquharson of Balmoral, I think myself bound in justice and out 
of regard to truth to certifie and declare that when he was in this place 
in January 1746, he behaved with the greatest humanity to my family 
where he lodged, and protected my house and effects from all injury as 
far as lay in his power, and when anything happened that tended to hurt 
my family regrated to my wife he was not able to go about to get her 
redress, but sent several times to the Duke of Perth and told him if his 
quarters were not protected he would apply elsewhere, which had its 
effect. All this I have from my wife, who signs with me. 

And furdcr, when provisions in the family were turning scarce, he 
desired my wife to tell her friends in the country to send what she wanted 
directed to his care, and told his servants to see that they meddled with 
nothing that was in the house or came to it, or if they did he would punish 
them severely. By which my wife was not only plentifully provided in all 
necessaries, but able to assist several of his Majesties armie who had 
been taken by the Rebels, and were at that time prisoners at Stirling ; 
and my wife declares she never heard him, the said James Farquharson, 
speak u disrespectful word of his Majesty King George, but reproved 
others when they did so : saying that he was still King of Britain, and 
that they were damnably impertinent for speaking disrespectfully of him 
in his company and presence. In witness whereof I and my said spouse 
have subscribed these presents at Stirling this third day of December 
one thousand seven hundred and fourty eight. 

(Signed) JA: PATERSONE. 
ELIZ: PATERSON. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Abel, William, 622. 
Aberbroth, 125. 
Abercrombie, James, 221, 233. 

John, 215, 218, 220, 228, 229. 
Aberdeen, passim. 

Old, 43- 

Aberdein, Alexander, 41, 48, 195, 197, 
206, 208, 212, 213, 214, 216, 217, 
219, 229, 230, 235, 261, 262, 264, 
265, 268. 

William, 219. 
Aberfeldy, 394, 520. 
Abergeldie, 20, 23, 237, 249, 255. 
Aberlour, 34, 37, 315, 318, 320. 
Abernethy, 37, 171, 315, 318, 320, 400, 

495; 544, 545- 

Captain George, 463, 464. 

James, 206, 2:5, 218, 220, 239. 
Abertarf, 143. 

Aberurcnill, Lord, I. 

Aboyne, 21, 504, 505, 507, 622. 

Earl of, 21, 23, 571. 
Achendown Castle, 546. 
Achendryn, II. 

Achingoul, 255, 257, 258, 259, 265. 
Achmoor, 546, 547- 
Achnachoil, 544. 
Achnacra, 544. 
Achnahyle, 17, 546, 547. 
Achnascra, 546, 547, 564. 
Achorachan, 16. 
Ackray, 514, 521, 542. 
Acton, Anne, 380. 
Adam, Alexander, 68. 

Patrick, 68, 80. 
Adams, James, 222. 
Adamson, John, 456. 
Adie, 314. 

Adison, George, 611. 
Agricola, 601. 
Ague, James, u, 12. 

John, II. 

Aiken, Alex., 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259. 

William, 220. 



Ainach, 545. 
Aird, 171. 
Airth, 366, 367. 

Earl of, 346, 348. 
John, 613. 

Aivn River, 504. 

Albemarle, Lord, 239, 274, 275, 276, 278, 

302, 303, 324. 
Aldie, David, 51. 
Alexander, George, 268. 

James, 225, 

Rev. John, 66, 113, 114, 115, 116, 
117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 
124, 128. 

Alford, 55, 58, 62, 63, 64, 66, 68, 75, Si, 
82, 84, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 93, 
94, 95, 101, 103, 106, 107, 108, 
109, no, 112, 113, 114, 622. 

Presbyterie of, 20, 21, 67, 84, 93, 

94, 108, 242. 
Allairg, 545. 
Allan, see Allen. 

- James, 237, 249, 254. 
Allanabium, 507. 
Allanach, Alaster, 14. 

James, 18. 
John, n, 14, 16. 
William, II. 

Allananhoir, 506. 
Allardes, John, 47, 48. 
Allardyce, James, 222, 238. 

Joseph, 239. 

Allen, John, 384, 389, 396, 434, 453, 460, 

465, 471, 475. 
Allenaquhock, II. 
Altananerock, 545. 
Altefugle, 543. 
Altnashien, 507. 
Alternour, 543. 
Alvaston, 292. 
Alves, 34. 

Amelot, Mons., 333. 
Ancrum, Lord, 254, 257, 271, 274, 275, 

310, 323, 514, 517. 



626 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Anderson, Alexander, 221. 
David, 68, 80, 8l. 

Prof. David, 594, 595- 

Duncan, of Candacraig, 15. 
- Gilbert, 206, 225. 

Isobel, 223. 

James, 225, 226. 

Jean, 40. 

John, 68, 223, 225. 

Patrick, of Bourtie, 206, 221. 

Robert, 80. 

Susan, 239. 

William, 225, 614. 
Andrew, Mr., 86. 
Angus, 306, 308. 

Braes of, 544- 
Annan, 286. 

Annand, Alexander, 236, 245, 254. 

Annandale, Marquis of, 7, 25. 

Appenedale, 170. 

Appin, 143, 144. 155, 168, 172. 174, 362. 

Applecross, 548. 

Ardclack, I. 

Ardkinloss, 167. 

Ardloch, 145. 

Ardlow, 403, 404. 

Ardnamurchan, 143, 509. 

Ardo, 237, 256, 269. 

Ardsheil, 314, 346, 362. 

Argeith, 21. 

Argo, William, 224. 

Argour, Lands of, 533, 534. 

Argyle, Duke of, 36, 53, 55, 144, 167, 169, 

3 2 4- 

Argyleshire, 134, 143, 169. 
Arisaig, 143, 168, 393, 509, 510, 535, 536, 

565. 

Arkeg, Loch, 513, 515, 533, 547, 565. 
Armstrong, Thomas, 332, 392, 467, 477, 

482, 611. 

Arnisdale, 565, 572. 
Arran, 157. 

Arthur, William, 206, 220. 
Artrochie, 206. 

Ashburn, 284, 290, 292, 341, 366, 373, 377. 
Assin (Appin), 568. 
Aslown, Overloun of, IOI. 
Aswanley, 546. 
Athol, 144, 170. 

Duke of, 154, 170, 172, 288, 343, 

344, 351, 542, 557. 
Auchinbreck, 167, 333. 
Auchindoiir, see Auchindore. 
Auchindore, 58, 622. 
Auchinhove, 21, 23. 
Auchintoul, 19, 20, 23. 
Auchlossan, 20, 23. 
Auchlyne, 23, 59. 



Auchriachan, 18. 

Auchterlonny, David, 266, 267. 

Augh-Chalada, 582. 

Auld, Janet, 230. 

Auldjo, John, 230, 232, 233, 234, 235, 267, 

271, 272, 273. 
Avimore, 504. 
Awn, River, 545. 

Bachadie, 332. 

Baddoch, 507. 

Badenoch, fee Ruthven of Badenoch. 

Badentoy, 256, 270. 

Badevin, 101. 

Baillie, Rev. Robert, 33, 35, 37. 

Bain, Alaster, 10. 

Alexander, 16. 

Andrew, 16. 

Donald, 17. 
Duncan, 9. 

James, II. 

John, 17, 18. 

Lachlan, 9. 

Pa., 14. 

William, 9, 14. 
Baine, James, 8. 

Thomas, 8. 

Baird, William, 221, 234, 243, 249, 254. 

Balachan, 537. 

Bald, Major-General, 303. 

Balfluig, 21, 23. 

Balfour, 86, loo. 

Ball, Capt., 542, 552, 562, 571. 

Ballentine, Capt., 250. 

Ballnacraig, 20, 270. 

Ballochbuee, 507. 

Balmerino, Lord, 313, 314, 323, 342, 402. 

Balmoral, 620, 621, 623, 624. 

Balnagask, 299. 

Balquhidder, 170. 

Balwiry, 114, 118. 

Banchery, see belyiv. 

Banchor, see belmv. 

Banchory, 206, 215, 218, 256, 269, 504, 

538, 539- 

Banff, 35, 303, 306, 308, 344, 406, 606. 
Bannacraig, see Ballnacraig. 
Bannerman, Alexander, 51, 195, 206, 208, 

216, 217, 225, 272. 

Capt., 39, 43, 51. 

Patrick, 43, 45, 46, 48, 49. 
Bannockburn, 296, 298, 400, 403, 410, 413. 
Banrannoch, 570. 

Barber, Miss Betty, 313. 
Barclay, James, 352, 353, 354, 355, 357, 
363, 364, 366, 367, 368, 371. 

John, 340. 
Bardowie, 157. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



627 



Baret, Isabel, 223. 

Barlar, 571. 

Barnes, Commodore, 327. 

Barra, 145, 509. 

Barrel, 295, 300, 301, 303. 

Barrisdale, 535, 572. 

Karri voue, 551. 

Barren, Peler, 195, 206, 208, 212, 214, 

216, 218, 221. 
Barrow, 301. 
Barrymore, Earl of, 333. 
Bartlet, George, 223. 

James, 41, 53. 

John, 222. 
Bath, Lord, 332. 
Baxter, Adam, 223. 

George, 237, 238. 

William, 224. 
Bayorat, 535, 536. 
Bean, George, 223. 
Beauty, 404. 
Bederstown, 299. 
Bedford, Duke of, 335, 40x3. 
Belabeg, 15. 
Belanasiobe, 540. 
Belhelvie, 239, 273. 

Bell, David, 359, 403, 410, 459. 

Belladrum, 336. 

Bellivatt, I. 

Bellwiry, see Balwiry. 

Belly (parish of), 34. 

Belnaboth, 21, 23. 

Belnboch, 14, 21, 23. 

Belnabodach, see Belnboch. 

Benbecula, 1 68. 

Bennett, William, 224. 

Bentlet, James, 53. 

Berkeley, Mr., 449. 

Bernara, 142, 147, 509, 510, 513, 514, 523, 



y, John, 4 



Berry, John, 449. 

Lachlan, 10. 
Berwick, 148, 282. 

John, 446. 
Bettie, Adam, 15. 

John, 15. 

William, 15. 
Beverly, John, 612. 
Bingham, John, 288. 
Binnavin, Glens of, 504. 
Binnavordy, 507. 
Binnbikrattich, 507. 
Birch, Mr., 291, 292. 
Birnie, James, 223. 
Birse, 232, 622. 

Bishops Hartfield, 617, 619. 
Bissat Commissary, 551. 
Bisset, James, 43, 51. 



Bithnie, 86, loo. 

Black, James, 53, 195, 206, 215, 218, 223, 

233- 

Black, John, 101, 102. 
Blackney, Col., 299, 306, 307. 
Blackwater, 547. 

Forest of, 508. 
Blackwell, T., 223. 

Thomas, 46. 
Blair, 301. 

in Athole, 617. 
Blairfindie, 16, 546, 564. 
Bland, General, 301, 510, 609. 
Blellack, 2O, 23. 

Blenchill, Mr. D., 221. 

Blethwayt, William, 52. 

Bligh, 303. 

Blood, Andrew, alias Blyde, 443, 449. 

Boatriphne, 232. 

Bockland, Colonel, 552, 571. 

Bogfairly, 299. 

Bogheads, 58. 

Bogunquill, 21, 23. 

Boharm, 318. 

Bohuntire, 519. 

Bonarkaig, 533, 534. 

Bonnar, Adam, 68, 80. 

Bony, Alexander, 17. 

Booth, William, 220, 235, 262, 263. 

Borlum, 143. 

Bothwell, John, 246. 

Bonnie, 1 10, 206. 

Bovie, Alan, 408. 

Bowker, Benj., 379, 435, 441. 447. 

Bowl Is, John, 221. 

Boyd, Lord, 325, 327. 

William, 324, 325, 327. 
Boynag, 507. 

Brachet, Lord, 530. 

Brachan, 145. 

Bradfut, Daniel, 594, 595, 596. 

Bradley, 290. 

Bradbury, Thomas, 379, 439, 441, 443, 447. 

Bradshaw, James, 449, 473. 

Braemar, 56, 114, 118, 119, 120, 121, 514, 

528, 544, 55 2 , S 62 , 564, 57', 5?S, 
584, 600, 603, 604, 605, 606. 

Brae Murry, 522. 

Bragath, 537. 

Brahan, 139, 148. 

Brampton, 283, 296, 370. 

Brasiner, David, II. 

Brebner, James, 45, 47, 48. 

William, 195, 206, 215, 218, 225. 
Breda, 55, 91. 

Bremmer, Alexander, 9. 
Bremner, Jean, 225. 
Bridgeend of Alford, 101. 



628 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Bridgeend of Mossct, 114. 
Brittough, William (alias Britter), 435. 
Briechen, 270. 
Broadalbin, Earl of, 167. 

'34, 144, IS 2 . 537- 
Broardfoord, 219. 
Broadhaugh, 101. 
Broadie, Captain, I. 
Brodie, 145. 

Broughton, 352, 353, 370. 
Broun, John, II. 

Pat., 1 6. 
Thomas, 16. 

Brown, Capt., 151, 152, 153, 155, 156, 157, 
158. 

Isaac, 463. 

James, 221. 

John, 263. 

William, 225. 
Browny, William, 101, 104. 

Bruce, David, Judge Advocate, 231, 232, 
236, 244, 246, 248, 249, 250, 251, 
254, 255, 256, 258, 259. 

John, 237, 250, 255, 437, 456, 467, 

478. 

Sir Michael, 408. 

Mr., 399, 405, 618. 
Brunswick, Duke of, 585, 586. 
Bruere, Lieut., 513, 519. 
Brux, 20, 23. 
Bryant, Abraham, 261. 
Buchan, 246, 407. 
Buchanan, Alexander, 6ll. 

John, 613, 614. 

(parish of), 532. 
Will, 532. 

Bulg Loch, 495. 
Burnet, Alexander, 222. 

Andrew, of Elrick, 47. 

George, 222. 

James, 195, 206, 215, 218, 225. 
John, 43, 45, 195, 206, 208, 212, 

213, 214, 216, 217, 220, 224, 226. 

of Kirkhills, 232, 271. 

Mr. (Regent of College), 587, 588, 

589, 592, 596. 
Burnett, Agnes, 223. 

Baillie, 49, 51, 197, 208, 212, 213, 

214, 216, 217, 226, 230, 235. 
Dr., 125. 

Bush, Mr., 304. 
Buy, Donald, 9. 

James, 9. 

John, 9. 
Byers, Jean, 221. 

Cabrach, 16, 90, 91, 232, 508, 544, 546, 
547, 564- 



Cadogan, Lieut. -General, 33, 35. 
Cairnbulg, 239. 
Cairntulhe, 176. 
Cairnvalg, 506. 

Caithness, 146, 236, 245, 257, 402, 403, 
411,412, 413. 

Earl of, 146, 172. 
Calder, 254, 318. 

Robert, 221. 
Callem, Duncan, 13. 

James, 13. 

Rot., 13. 
Camasnakest, II. 
Camdel Moor, 547. 
Camdell, 4, 16. 

Cameron, Alexander, 356, 394, 612. 

Allan, 394. 

Angus, 523, 540. 

Archibald, 355, 613. 

Donald, of Lochiel, 346, 349, 355, 

372. 

Donald, 612. 

Duncan, 518. 

Ewen, 396. 

John, of Brigath, 574. 

John, 239, 519, 583. 

Ludovic, of Torcastle, 355. 

Murdoch, 614. 

of Glendessery, 573. 

of Glen Nevis, 523. 

of Kinlochleven, 583. 
Camerons, 134, 135, 136, 143, 144, 155, 

169, 172, 174, 354, 356. 

John and William, 16. 
Cammell, Alexander, 9. 
Campbell, Alexander, 6l2. 

Lieut. Alexander, 335, 515. 

Angus, 614. 

Sir Archibald, 144. 

Archibald, 540. 

Capt., 408, 465, 479, 482, 510, 511. 

Charles, 433, 434. 

Lieut. Charles, 338, et stq. 
Collin, 46. 

Donald, 268, 269. 

Sir Duncan, 151, 153, 154, 159. 

Duncan, 515, 524, 526, 614. 

Ensign, 512. 

Rev. George, 622. 

General, 336. 

Hector, 402, 413, 469. 

Lady Isabel, 384, 390, 434, 452, 

453, 460. 

Sir James, 333. 

James, 612. 

John, 404. 

Mr., 304, 336, 519, 520, 55'- 

William, 16. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



629 



Campbells, 167, 172. 

Candacraig, 15, 21. 

Canesbie, 402. 

Canglas, 545. 

Canna, 143, 168, 509. 

Canongate, 124, 127. 

Caplich, 507. 

Cappoch, Parson, 290. 

Carey, Capt., 462. 

Cargill, D., 221. 

Carlisle, passim. , 

Carnagavall, Ford of, 504, 506, 507, 508, 

545- 

Came, John, 568. 
Carnegie, John, 48. 
Carnousie, 407. 
Carnvaig, 506. 
Carnwath, 362, 363. 
Carran, 17. 
Carriston, 126. 
Carron, 296, 298. 
Carry bragh, 522. 

Carstares, Very Rev. William, 31, 32. 
Gary, 541, 551. 
Catanach, Alester, 9. 

Andrew, 611. 

Donald, 9. 

Duncan, 613. 

George, 219. 

James, 41, 43, 47, 48, 51. 
Catinach, James, 10. 
Cattinach, James, 12. 

Catto, Alexander, 237, 249, 255. 

Cawlfield, Major, 279. 

Cay, Ensign, 533, 548, 554, 566, 572. 

George, 476. 
Chaban, Major, 248. 

Chaddock, alias Chadwick, Thomas, 441. 

Challin, 540. 

Chalmers, Alexander, 221. 

Mr. Alexander, 315, 317, 318. 

of Bannacraig, 2O, 270. 

Elizabeth, 225. 

Francis, 389, 455, 482. 

George, 227, 252, 592, 593, 594, 

595, 596. 

Rev. James, 35. 

John, 223. 

Mr. John, Principal, 623, 624. 

Peter, 219. 

Regent, 239. 

Robert, 221. 

Thomas, 390, 396, 434, 460, 464, 

471. 

Provost William, 195, 215, 218, 

223, 229, 230, 232, 235, 260, 261, 
262, 263, 264, 265, 268. 
Chaplain, Andrew, 126. 



Charles I., 602. 

- II., t7S- 

Alexander, 48. 

Edward, Prince, 182, 183, 186, 187, 

188, 192, 193. 

James, 404. 
Cheap, Henry, 459, 482. 
Chew, Edward, 472. 
Cheyne, John, 223. 
Chisholm, Archibald, 574. 

Colonel, 313. 

Donald, 400. 

Laird of, 566. 

Mr., 549. 

William, 613, 614. 
Chisholms, 144, 145, 155, 172. 
Cholmondley, 300, 301, 303. 
Christal, Peter, 262. 
Christall, John, 220. 
Christie, Alexander, 223. 

George, 206. 

Robert, 224. 

William, 101, 105, 221. 
Chrystie, Duncan, 12. 

James, 12. 
Churchill, General, 306. 
Clan Chattan, 171. 
Clanronald, 168, 356, 357, 372. 
Clargue, 504. 

Clark, William, 389, 395, 482. 

Clarke, Esme, 528. 

date, Kirk of, 64, 89. 

Clatt, 622. 

Clcrihue, Alexander, 68, So. 

Rev. Mr., 88, 89. 
Clerk, Donald, II. 

- John, n, 43, 222, 224. 

John, yor. , II. 

- Joseph, 13. 

Laurence, 250, 254. 

William, 13, 114, 117, 220. 
Clunie, Laird of, 156. 

Cluny, 260, 334, 360, 622. 

Water of, 17. 
Cobban, Jerom, 221. 
Cobham, Lord, 248, 249, 299, 301, 303. 
Cochran, Walter, 222, 231, 234. 
Cock, Marjory, 223. 
Cockburne, Sir Adam, 52. 
Coke, Lord, 375. 
Cockenny, 279, 280. 
Coigach, 145. 
Coldstane, 622. 
Coldstream, 282. 
Coleman, Austin, 377, 379, 396, 435, 439, 

441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 447. 
Coll, 143. 
Collbline, 8. 



630 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Collens, John. 436, 439, 440, 443, 446, 451. 
Collie, George, 269. 

Mr. W., 319. 

Robert, 272. 

Collier, Charles, 514, 518, S47, 554, 5^5. 

572, 579, 584. 
Collingwood, General, 560. 
Collison, Barbara, 223. 
Colpnay, 195. 
Colquhon, Archibald, 613. 

Major, 514. 
Comay, Donald, 9. 
Comerie, John, 452. 
Congleton, 284, 295, 351, 387. 
Connor, John, 434, 444, 453. 
Cook, 290. 

Alexander, 14. 

James, 254, 255, 256, 258, 259. 

Lord, 331. 

Thomas, 55, 121, 122, 144. 
Cooper, George, 195, 197, 212, 214, 216, 

218, 219. 

John, 224. 

\Villiam, 224. 

Cope, Sir John, 196, 197, 279, 280, 347, 

372, 387, 388, 391, 397, 569, 607. 

Copland, Alexander, 206, 215, 218, 222, 

233- 

Charles, 41, 195, 206, 220, 221. 

Rev. Mr., 66, 87, 88, 89. 91, 118. 
William, 206, 215, 218, 224, 233. 

Corbred (King of Scots), 601. 

Cordiner, William, 13,57,58, 114, 121,123. 

Corgarff, 306, 310, 311, 494, 504, 527, 528, 

545, 547, 553, 563, 57 ",579,5*4. 
Cone, 402. 

Corneille, Capt., 513, 515. 
Cornroigh, 507. 
Cornwal, 282. 
Corrybrugh, 313, 522, 538. 
Corryvooe, 507. 
Corryvrion, 506. 
Corse, 239. 
Cortachie, 564. 
Corwannan, 537. 
Cotton, Sir John Ilirnle, 333. 
Cottown, of Walhouse, 101. 
Coull, 548, 622. 
Coulnaill, 522. 
Countesswells, 224, 299. 
Couper, John, II. 
Coutes, Rot., 8. 
Couts, Alester, II. 

Alexander, 9. 

David, 10. 

Donald, IO, 12. 

James, to, II. 

James, of Ransanttrish, 113. 



Couts, John, 9, 14, 68, 80. 

William, 231, 612. 
Coutts, John, 227. 
Cow, William, 18. 
Cowe, John, 478. 
Cowie, John, 407, 479. 
Cowts, James, 12. 
Crab, David, 612. 
Crafthead, 547. 

Cragg, Thomas, 378, 379, 436, 439, 440, 

441, 442, 443, 446, 447, 448. 
Craibstone, Lady, 271. 

299. 
Craig, 21, 23. 

Alexander, 237, 258. 

Capt., 378, 379, 435, 436, 442, 448, 

457> 463- 
Craigie, John, 14. 

William, 14. 
Craigievar, 20, 21, 23, 55, 91. 
Crathes, 239. 

Crathie, 12, 232. 
Crawford, Major, 516. 

Peter, 459. 
Crichton, Lord, 405. 

of Auchingoul, 255, 259, 265, 268, 

269. 

Crieff, 394, 510, 524, 552, 573, 582, 583. 
Crockat, John, 318. 
Croll, James, 221. 
Cromarr, 504, 564. 
Cromarty, 145. 

Earl of, 172. 

Lord, 313, 323, 402, 403, 411, 412, 

413, 609. 

Crosby, Capt., 232, 240, 243, 251. 
Croy, 318. 

Adam, 13. 
Cruden, William, 53, 224. 
Cruickshank, John, 231, 235, 255. 

William, 220, 230. 

George, 48. 

James, 222. 

William, 265. 
Crukshank, Andrew, 18. 

William, 17, 40. 

Crystal!, William, 195, 206, 208, 212, 214, 

216, 218, 225. 
Cuaigh, Loch, 508. 
Culcaim, 145. 
Cullen, 238, 303. 
Cullncayll, 504. 
Culloden, 34. 200, 312, 313, 318, 321, 322, 

387, 388, 389, 393, 394, 395, 39, 
400, 401, 402, 403, 407, 408, 409, 
410,412, 561, 608, 609. 

Culqhuoich, 114, 1 1 8. 

Culquhany, 14. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



631 



Cullquharie, 21. 
Culsalmond, 88. 
Cults, 12. 

Gordon, 21, 23. 
Cumberland, 154, 372. 

Duke of, 199, 202, 203, 205, 230, 

233. 234, 235, 236, 240, 241, 259, 
284,285,291,334,608,615. 
Cumine, Lieut., 538, 539, 551, 561, 568, 

569. S/o, 576. 577, 5 8 '. 582. 
Cuming, Alexander, 611. 

George, 29. 

John, 45. 
Cummmg, , 60, 153. 

Donald, 18. 

John, 18. 
Cummins, 167. 
Cupar, 126. 
Cushney, 21, 55, 90. 
Cushnies, P. and A., 221. 
Cushny, P., 234. 

Cuthbert, D., 195, 206, 208, 212, 213, 214, 
216, 218, 222, 226, 239. 

Dalkeith, 354, 356, 359, 406. 

Dallas, 318. 

Dallaverrer, 17. 

Dallenveigh, 552. 

Dalludies, 206, 212, 214, 216, 217. 

Dalmore, II. 

Dalnacardoch, 494, 498, 507, 512, 539, 

54. 541, 55', 552, 570. 
Dalspid.il, 540. 
Dalwhinnie, 493, 498, 512, 538, 539, 540, 

569, 570, 573, 582. 
Dason, Alexander, 224. 
Dasson, Alaster, 14, 15. 

George, 13. 

James, 14. 

John, 14. 

Walter, 14. 
Dauney, Rev. Francis, 622. 
Davenport, Sir Peter, 371. 
Davidson, Alexander, 47, 48, 611. 

Baillie, 195, 197, 206, 215, 218, 239. 

Charles, 237. 

George, 225. 

James, 47, 48, 225, 407, 613. 

John, 268, 269, 397. 

William, 224, 233. 
Davidsone, John, 75. 

Davison, John, 378, 397, 433, 435, 462, 

464, 472. 
Dawson, Capt., 449. 

James, 449. 
Deacon, Charles, 438, 449. 

Robert, 449. 

Thomas T., 446, 449, 615, 616. 



Deans, James, 222, 233. 
Deason, James, 223. 
Delaney, Joseph, 239. 
Dellchruinach, 507. 
Delnabo, 17. 
Delnaverta, 508. 
Deloraine, 152. 
Denovn, Rev. Alexander, 34. 
Derby, 255, el seq. 
Derrybeg, 539, 541. 
Derwent, River, 292. 
Desbrisay, Peter, 530, et seq. 
Desbrosses, Capt., 378. 
Deskry, 15, 21. 
Desvories, Lieut., 556. 
Deuchar, David, 224. 
Deviot, 34. 
Dey, James, II. 

- John, 588. 
Die, Bridge of, 299. 
Dillebegg, 583. 
Dingwall, 388. 

John, 233. 
Dinkenfield, Justice, 448. 
Dirleton, Lady, 313. 
Dirom, Alexander, 209, 210. 

George, 225. 
Disblair, 206, 208. 
Doge, John, 398. 
Delias, Alexander, 224. 
Donald, Angus, 555. 

James, 10, 68, So, 238, 249, 255. 
Donaldson, Catharin, 222. 

George, 222. 

- James, 223, 437, 438. 

John, 434, 452, 460, 464. 
Donnan, 136. 

Dorzeal, IOI. 

Douglas, D'Hortore, 486. 

F., 220. 
"- Hugh, 342, 348, 351, 358, 366. 

Isabel, 554. 
John, 47, 48. 
Patrick, 482, 586. 

Thomas, 239. 
Douglass, William, 222. 
Douglasses, 167. 
Doul, Duncan, 1 8. 

William, 18. 
Dounie, Al., 14. 
Douny, Pat., IO. 
Dow, Alaster, 581. 

Angus, 22. 
Downan, 546, 547. 
Downey Castle, 336, 412. 
Downie, Alexander, 8. 
Drake, Thomas, 397, 433. 
Drewry, J., 293. 



632 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Drum, 21, 23. 
Drumminn, 18. 

Drummond, James, 342, 346, 400, 405, 
611, 613. 

Lord John, 193, 194, 247, 296, 298, 

322. 334, 35, 35', 400, 401, 609. 

John, 407. 

Lord Lewis, 313. 

Mr., 332, 333. 

Robert, 45. 

of Bahadie, 154. 
Drummonds, 169, 170. 
Drummossie Muir, 608. 
Drysdale, Alexander, 220. 
Du, Duncan, n. 

Edward, n. 

John, II. 
Dualtean, 507. 

Dubrach, 306, 443, 444, 490, 492, 494, 498, 

506, 527. 

Duckison, John, 220. 
Duckworth, John, 400. 
Dudingston, 365, 395, 433, 607. 
Due, Donald, 16. 
Duff, Adam, 195, 225. 

Gilbert, 222. 

John, 114, 120, 121. 

Mr., 145, 278. 

Peter, 307. 
Dufius (parish of), 34. 

Duguid, George, 206, 225, 234, 242, 244. 

Dumbar, Jerom, 55- 

Dumnaglass, 369, 569, 577. 

Dun, Precentor of, 257. 

Dunans, 544. 

Dunballoch, 335. 

Dunbar, 279, 392. 

John, 15. 

Dunbarton, 132, 151, 152, 162. 
Dunbennon, 301. 

Dunbeth, 172. 

Dunblane, 34, 154, 411. 

Dunbrath, 412. 

Duncan, Alexander, 225, 613. 

David, 225. 

John, 219, 223, 236, 245, 255, 265. 

Robert, 220. 

William, 206, 208, 220, 225. 
Dundass, Mr., 248. 
Dundee, Lord, 346, 348. 
Dune, John, 8. 
Dungallon, 3$b. 
Dunipace, 294, 296. 
Dunkeld, 170, 239, 388. 
Dunlop, Capt., 254. 
Dunn, 220. 

Dunrobin, 402, 403, 411, 412. 
Duntroon, 348. 



Durrat, William, 613. 

Durward, John, 41, 215, 218, 219. 

Robert, 221. 
Duthal, 315, 318. 
Duthie, Francis, 263. 
Dyce, Alexander, 206, 224. 

James, 195, 206, 208, 212, 214, 216, 

218, 221, 222, 229. 

John, 225. 
Dyve, Capt., 250. 

Ecclefechan, 286. 

Echt, 48, 487. 

Eden, 283. 

Edinburgh, passim. 

Edinglassie, 21. 

Edhouse, Capt., 542, et seq. 

Edward I., 601. 

Francis, 263. 

William, 262. 

Edwards, Henry, 403, 411, 455, 458. 

Egg, 509- 

Elcho, Lord, 287, 288, 324, 341, 342, 346, 

361, 372, 387, 450. 
Elgin, 30, 31, 32, 34, 37, 315, 316, 318, 

321, 389, 393, 400, 404, 405, 407, 

408, 606. 
Elinquich, 545. 
Eliot, Gil., 25. 
Elian, 522, 538, 539. 
Elles, John, 12. 
Ellies, Alexander, 224. 
Ellon, 101, 108. 
Elmslie, John, 223. 
Elphingston, Elphinston, J., 195, 206, 212, 

214, 216, 218, 222, 224, 245. 
Elphinston, John, of Belabeg, 15. 

William, 236, 249, 253, 265, 266. 
Elphinstonpans, 389. 

Elrick, 206. 

Elsmie, James, 8. 

Enernaneshah, 543. 

Enzie, 171. 

Erach, Loch, 508. 

Erroll, Earl of, 322. 

Ersk, John, alias Mcgrigor, II. 

Erskin, Donald, n nil. 

Erskine, Capt., 39. 
- Mr., 282. 

Esk, 286. 

Evos, Lieut., 552. 

Exeter, Lord, 288, 292. 

Eyre, Capt., 389, 393, 395, 398, 401, 403, 
406, 408, 409, 410, 413, 454, 456, 
459, 468, 470, 474, 478, 479, 482. 

Fairbour, 548. 

Fairholms, Thomas and Adam, 227. 



I 

INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



633 



Falconer, John, 221, 393, 454, 456. 

Falkirk, 263, et seq. 

Falkner, John, 482. 

Fallar, 507. 

Farnal, La. Dan., 452. 

Farquhar, D., 195, 197, 233, 239. 

John, 224, 336, 400. 

Robert, 222. 
William, 237, 249, 255. 

Farquharson, Colonel, 314. 

Daniel, 48, 53. 

Francis, of Monaltrie, 368, 478, 

611. 

James, of Balmoral, 620, 621, 623, 

624. 

Capt. John, 468, 479, 61 1. 

Patrick, of Inverey, 10. 

Thomas, 48. 

William, 612. 
ffarquharson, Alester, 9, 17. 

- Alexander, 16. 

Grigor, 17. 

Farquharsons, 144, 170, 172, 368. 
Farquharsone, John, of Invercald, 4, 9, 20, 

22, 23. 
Farq r son, Fr. , of Finzean, 20, 23. 

Daniel, 222. 

Jo., of Kirkton of Aboyne, 21, 23. 

John, of Allenaquoich, n. 

Herie, of Whithouse, 20, 22. 

Ludovic, of Auchindryn, n. 

Thomas, 225. 

of Invercald, 521. 

ffarq'son, Donald, of Camasnakest, II. 

ffindlay, of Cults, 12. 

James, of Tullichoy, 12. 

John, of Old Lerg, 15. 
ffarq'sone, Archibald, 9. 

Charles, 8. 

Donald, 8, 10. 

ffindlay, 8, 10. 

James, 10, II, 17, 18. 
John, 8, n. 

John, elder, 8. 

John and Hary, 12. 

Rot., 9. 
William, II, 15, 18. 

Fawkener, Sir Everard, 231, 232, 241, 242, 

243, 244, 246, 249, 336. 
Fawside, 280. 
Ferguson, Capt., 535. 

Donald, 482, 611. 

James, 224, 246. 

John, 614. 
Fergusone, Francis, 55. 
Ferres, Alexander, 56, 57, 58. 
Ferryhill, 249. 

Feshee Glen, 538, 539. 



ffard, Lachlan, 14. 
Findhorn, 273. 
Fiott, John, 466. 
Findlater, A., 222. 
Findlay, Patrick, 225, 226. 
Findlayson, John, 611. 
Finnic, George, 224. 

John, 55, 225. 
ffinie, Pat., 13. 

Finzean, 20, 22, 23, 88, 89. 
Fitzgerald, j., 221. 
Fitzherbert, Mr., 449. 
Fivie, 301. 
Fleming, Alexander, 255, 269. 

- General, 272, 299, 303. 

Walter, 206, 219. 
ffleeming, John, 12. 
Fleeming, James, 1 6. 
ITleming, Duncan, II. 

Fletcher, George, 379, 380, 381, 441). 
Fochabers, 239, 389, 400, 404, 405, 407. 
Footdee (Futtie), 236, 237, 245, 249, 255, 

257, 259, 265. 
Forbes (parish of), 622. 

Alexander, of Cullquharie, 21. 

- Alexander, of Ludquhatne, 53. 

Alexander, 45, 220, 221, 390, 396, 

434, 452, 460, 471, 476. 

Archibald, of Putachie, 55, 56, 57, 

58. 

Arthur, of Breda, 55, 56, 57, 58. 89. 

Rev. Arthur, 88. 

- Arthur, of Fcht, 48, 53. 

Arthour, of Achintoull, 20, 22, 23. 

Baillie, 206. 

- Capt., 543, 554, 562. 

Charles, 195, 220. 
Dr., 236, 267. 

George, 206, 219, 222, 238. ^49, 

257, 260, 612. 

Hugh, y r . of Craigicvnr, 91. 
Isobel, 223. 

J., of Balfluig, 21, 2j;. 
J., of Leslie, 23. 

J. R., of Brux, 23. 

James, of Glencarvie, 21. 
Tames, 239. 

Dr. James, 206, 215, 218. 
John, 220, 223. 

John, of Inverernan, 4, 20, 23. 

Keneth, 590. 

Lachlan, of Edinglassie, 21. 

Lady Dowager, 89. 

Lieut., 306, 308, 490, 491, 497, 510. 

Lord, I, 19, 20, 21, 23, 60, 71, 88, 

89- 

Lord President, 328, 330, 561. 

Margaret, 225. 



634 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Forbes, Patrick, 29, 53, 114, 118, 120. 

Patrick, of Culquhany, 14. 
- Roderick, y r . of Brux, 20, 22. 

Roderick, 221. 

Robert, 463. 

Thomas, 15, 55, 469. 

- Sir William, 55, 56, 57, 58. 
William, Thesaurer, 40, 45. 
William, 48, 220, 221, 222. 

- of Culloden, 144, 145. 
Forbess, Thomas, of Echt, 487. 

fforbes, Alexander, of Innernochtie, 14, 21. 

Arthur, 14. 

Donald, II. 

- George, of Skellater, elder, 14, 21, 

23- 

John, 14. 

John, of Deskry, 15, 21. 

John, of Invernettie, 14, 20, 23. 

John, of Ledmacny, 14. 

Nathaniel!, of Argeith, 21. 

William, of Belnboch or Belna- 

bodach, 4, 21, 23. 
Ford, Mr., 332, 403, 474. 
Fordyce, Baillie, 53, 219. 

- George, 592, 594. 

Mrs., 273. 

1'rofessor and George, 222. 
Forglen, Lord, 596. 

Forres, 32, 33, 34, 35, 37, 315, 319, 320, 

321. 

Foster, Lieut., 537, 577. 
Forster, Mr., 331, 332. 
fforsyth, David, 9. 
Fort Augustus, 276, 304, 395, 400, 490, 

510, 512, 515, 523, 549, 550, 580, 

581. 

Fort George, 163, 164, 165. 
Fort William, 140, 141, 142, 147, 163, 

164,395, 397, 5'3, 523, 533, 5?o. 
Fortrose, Lord, 172, 335, 548. 
Fothrington, 516. 
Foules, 172. 
Fowler, Agnes, 221. 
Fox, Mr., 572, 579, 584. 
Francey, Mr., 288. 
Fraser, A., 586, 587, 588, 589, 590. 591, 

592. 

Colonel, 313. 
Donald, 411, 469, 6ll. 
Hugh, 334, 335, 523, 590, 612. 

John, 206, 215, 218, 219, 221, 390, 

396, 433, 434, 471, 475- 

Rev. Michael, 34. 

Peter, 336. 

Robert, 336. 

Simon, 343. 

Thomas, of Gortuleg, 333. 



Fraser, Thomas, 204, 220, 222, 614. 

William, 612. 

of Foyers, 560. 
ffraser, Alexander, 10. 

Donald, 12. 

John, 12. 

Thomas, 12. 

William, 18. 
Frazer, Alexander, 9. 

John, 452, 460, 464, 476. 
ffrazer, Alexander, 9. 

All., 9. 
John, 9, 12. 

Frazers, 144, 171, 172, 343. 

Frazerfield, 299. 

Freebairne, Robert, 45. 

Freeman, John, 222. 

ffreemings, peter, 16. 

French, John, 221, 222, 226, 233. 

Robert, 226. 
Frenchfor, John, 219. 
Frosterhill, 48. 
Fudd, William, 398, 580. 
Fulerton, James, 68, So. 
Furnivall, Thomas, 449. 
Fydler, James, 346. 
FytT, James, 43. 



Gad, Capt., 433. 
Gairn, 543. 
Gairnside, 508. 
Gald, Alexander, 16. 

James and Rot., 17. 

John, 12, 18. 
Galloway, 154. 

Garden, Rev. Alexander, 248, 622. 

Alexander, 593, 595. 

- Dr., 124, 126. 

Gardner, Colonel, 279, 280, 281, 291. 
Garioch, Rev. Alexander, 622. 

- Alexander, 86, 109, 272. 

George, of Kinstair, 21, 23. 

J-, 23- 

K., of Tillichetlie, 21, 23. 

Rev. Mr., 64, 65, 66, 88, 92, 113, 

123. 
- P., 21. 

Patrick, 68. 
Garmouth, 239. 
Garnagoul, 547. 
Garntilly, 172. 

Garrioch, Andrew, 206, 222. 

- George, 206, 215, 218, 222, 226, 

227, 229, 239. 
Garry, Loch, 508. 
Gartly, 34. 
Garvibeg, 537, 549. 






INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



635 



Garvimore, 493, 512, 519, 526, 537, 549, 

568, 569, 573. 
Gask, 363, 364, 365, 366. 
Gassack, Grigor, 9. 
Gatt, James, 589, 590, 591, 596. 
Gaulaig, 507. 
Geddes, Andrew, 612. 
Gellan, Alexander, 86, 100. 

Robert, 86, 100. 
Gelly, George, 238. 

- (or Gellie), James, 43, 45, 49, 50, 

224, 238. 

Patrick, 45. 

Robert, 41. 

William, 53. 
Geneva, 327. 

George, King, 29, el set/. 
Georghegan, Le Chr., 486. 
Gerrard, A., 220. 
Gerry, Loch, 539. 
Gianlich, 545. 
Gib, Alexander, 554. 
Gibbon, Arthur, 114, 121. 

- William, 58, 114, 118, 119. 
Gibson, Andrew, 389. 

Edward, 402, 474, 479. 
Gilchrist, Rev. John, 31, 32. 
Gilcomstown, 299. 
Gill, Alexander, 466. 
Gillanders, J., 21, 23. 
Gillenders, Alaster, 15. 
Gillespie, Thomas, 612. 
Gillespy, Anne, 239. 

John, 239. 
Gisborne, Thomas, 288. 
Gladsmuir, 295. 
Glammis, 295. 

Glasgo, Major, 313, 314, 398. 

Glasgow, 151, 272, 334, 353, 368, 370, 

389, 393. 403, 46, 407- 
Glasgowego, 237, 249, 255. 
Glass, 315. 

James, 10. 

Glen Banchor, 493, 550, 573. 
Barisdale, 535. 

Cannick, 574. 

- Clova, 494, 495, 507, 544. 
Dee, 506, 543. 

Dissery, 534, 555. 

Dulachin, 535. 
Fechry, 550. 
Fechy, 493, 508. 
Fetich, 546, 547. 

- Glene, 549. 

Ilbay, 578. 

Keppoch, 555. 

Killin, 576. 
Lioigh, 557. 



Glen Lockey, 549. 
- Lye, 565- 

Magerore, 576. 

Mashie, 576. 

Nevis, 523. 
Pain, 533, 534. 

Patney, 543. 

Renis, 546, 547. 

Roy, 508, 537, 549, 555, 573, 574. 
Tarbot, 534. 

Tryme, 573. 

Glenalmond (or amond), 170, 494. 
Glenavie, 501. 

Glenavin, 495, 508. 

Glenbeg, 406, 407. 

Glenbogg, 543. 

Glenbrown, 545. 

Glenbucket, 65, 86, 109, 253, 272, 288, 508. 

Glenbuilg, 507. 

Glencallader, 506, 507. 

Glencarvie, 21. 

Glenclunie, 491, 492, 494, 495, 506, 507, 

543- 
Glenco, 174, 360, 501, 509, 518, 539, 540, 

541, 583- 

Laird of, 156, 168. 
Glencuy, 117, 119. 
Glendrummond, 549. 
Glendy, Laird of, 21, 22. 
Glenernan, 508. 
Glenelg, 143, 523. 
Glenesk, 507. 

Gleney, 506. 

Glenfalloch, 526, 542, 578. 

Glenfearnall, 507. 

Glenfinnan, 509, 510, 533, 534, 548, 572. 

Glengarry, 143, 144, 145, 154, 155, 168, 

'74, 38, 333, 495, 50i, 508, 509, 

538, 549, 56o, 582. 
Glenguishich, 506, 507. 
Glengyle, 542, 578. 
Glenie, Thomas, 224. 
Glenkindie, 13. 
Glenleogh, 533, 547, 548, 554, 556, 565, 

572, 579- 

Glenlivet, 16, 310, 546, 547, 564. 
Glenlyon, 170, 494, 540, 541, 557. 
Glenluy, 506, 507. 
Glenmore, 506, 507, 508, 549. 
Glenmorison, 509, 513, 537, 549, 568. 
Glenmoriston, 155, 172, 501, 555, 568. 
Glenmuick, 491, 492, 494, 544, 622. 
Glennie, George, 101, 104. 

Thomas, 260. 
Glenoughty, 495, 508. 
Glenquich, 549. 
Glenrinnes, 16. 

Glenshee, 170, 495, 506, 537, 543, 544, 578. 



636 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Glenshiel, 537, 548, 549, 558- 

Glenshiels, 140. 

Glenspeanan, 509, 537, 573. 

Glentanar, 248, 507. 

Glentannick, 506. 

Glentatnick, 57- 

Glentilt, 506, 507. 

Glnny, John, 220. 

Gloshaltmore, 543. 

Goddard, Capt., 248. 

Golaviran, 541. 

Goldie, Peter, 366, 371. 

Gollon, John, (ill. 

Goodtrees, 52. 

Gordon, A., of Auchlyne, 23, 59. 

- Alexander, of Camdell, 416. 

. Alexander, 10, 18, 40, 45, 55, 224, 
225, 594- 

- Capt. Alexander, 195. 
Andrew, 10. 

liaillie, 215, 218, 235. 

Capt., 6 1 8. 

- Charles, 390, 391, 392. 

- Mr. Charles, 332. 

Cults, 21, 23. 

Donald, 9. 

. Duke of, 59, 143, 144, 145, r?i, 

172, 344, 491, 504. 
Duncan. 41. 
F., of Craig, 21, 23. 

- ()., of Terpersie, 20, 23. 

- George, '95, 197, 206, 215, 218, 

220, 223, 227, 233, 254, 611. 

Lieut. George, 61 1. 
Professor George, 585, 587, 592. 
Rev. George, 318. 

Hugh, 472. 

T., of Laso, 21. 

Ja., of Newbigging, 21, 23. 

Janet, 221. 

James, 12, 13, 18, 206, 215, 218, 220, 

223, 226, 228, 229, 612. 
James, Dean of Guild, 43. 

Dr. James, 206, 215, 218, 238, 239, 

267. 

Rev. James, 1 10. 

Jo., of Hallhead, 21, 23. 
John, 10, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 21, 81, 
102, 106, 221, 269, 593. 

- John, of Knockaspack, 15, 20, 21, 

22. 

Dr. John, 43, 48, 51. 
Rev. John, 65, 86, 88, 109. 
Lady, 314, 6lO. 

- Lord Lewis, 207, 209, 254, 340, 344, 

345. 350. 

Lodvick, of Minnimore, 18. 
Major, 39. 



Gordon, Mr., 401, 465, 472. 

Pat., 15. 

Rev. Patrick, 66, 88, 90, 91, 92, 

101, 109, 119, 120, 121, 122, 318. 

Provost John, 592. 
Rev. , 34. 

Richard, 594. 

Mr. Richard, 215, 218, 220. 

Rot., 12, 15. 

Rev. Theodore, 622. 

Thomas, 17, 222, 397, 465, 482. 

Walter, 225, 613. 

William, 16, 17, 18, 29, 41, 48, 49, 
220, 229, 230, 270. 

- Sir William, 145, 352. 

of Abergeldie, 20, 21, 23, 237, 255. 

- of Blellack, 20, 23. 

- of Glenbucket, 288, 310, 353, 354, 

355, 372, 391- 397, 398, 545- 
Gordone, J., of Laws, 23. 

John, 8. 
Provost, 53. 

Gordons Miln, 257. 
Gorthwick, 576. 
Gortuleg, 333, 334. 
Govill, 48. 
Gow, James, 18. 

John, 12. 
Graham, 170. 

- Anne, 392, 467. 

Charles, 612. 
Dugal, 521. 
Father, 296. 

James, Earl of Airth, 346, 348. 
James, y r . of Airth, 366, 367. 
John, 412. 

- of Bran, 154. 
Grange, 318. 
Grantham, 299. 
Grant, Alaster, 18. 

Alexander, of Nevie, 16. 

- Alexander, 16, 17, 18, 575. 

- Sir Archibald, 310. 

- Arthur, 17. 

- Castle, 318. 

Donald, 8, 9, 17, 18, 613. 
Dun., 9, 1 8. 

Rev. George, 318. 

- Grigor, of Dallaverrer, 17. 
James, of Achnahyle, 17. 
James, 14, 16, 17, 388, 568, 569. 
John, 9, 10, 15, 17, 18. 

John, of Achriachan, 18. 

John, of Blairfindie, 16. 
John, of Carran, 17. 
John Roy, 231, 255. 

Lachlan, of Delnabo, 17. 

Laird of, 31, 32, 37, 145. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



637 



Grant, Lodwick, 25, 34. 

Pat., II, 15, 17. 

Mr. Patrick, 315, 318. 

Robert, 55, 612. 

William, 16, 17, 55, 612. 
Grants, 144, 171, 172. 
Grasick, John, 613. 
Grasseck, Donald, 9. 

Peter, 14. 

William, 10. 
Grassick, Alaster, 15. 

Alexander, 14. 

William, 15. 
Gray, Alexander, 206, 222. 

Charles, Ensign, 549. 

James, 472. 

John, 339, 343, 344, 352, 354, 355, 

368, 369, 370, 412, 613. 

Patrick, 43, 45, 47, 48, 51. 

William, 55, 206, 220, 224, 239. 
Green, William, 219, 305. 
Greenfield, 523. 

Gregore, Clan, 170. 

Gregory, Dr., 236, 265, 266. 

Greme, John, 13. 

Grever, John, II. 

Greystone, IOI. 

Grier, Donald, 9. 

Grigg, J., 220. 

Grosset, Capt., 314. 

Groves, John, 239. 

Gruar, Don., 9. 

Gruard, Donald, 8. 

Gruare, Alexander, 9. 

Guiley, Forrest of, 495. 

Guise, General, 280, 536, el smj. 

Guissock, John, 612. 

Haddington, 279, 392. 

Hailes, 52. 

Hale, Lord Chief Justice, 374, 375, 391. 

Hall, William, 222. 

Hallhead, 21, 23. 

Hamilton, 280, 281. 

Daniel, 223. 

Duke of, 322, 324, 325, 327, 328. 

John, 198, 372, 373, 460. 
hardie, John, 14. 

Harris, 143, 169. 

Hastie, William (surgeon), 339, et seq. 

Haughton, 21, 23. 

Hawley, General, 294, 387, 609. 

Hay, Adam, 406. 

Andrew, y'. of Rannes, 487, 489. 

Brigadier, Jun. , 314. 

George, 343. 

Alexander, 12, 587. 

James, 239, 61 1. 



Hay, Capt. James, 482, 483, 485, 486. 

John, 18, 370, 371, 412, 454, 482, 

585, 588, 592. 

William, 15, 16, 225. 
Hayg, 239. 

Heathcote, Mr., 288. 
Hector, Alexander, 223. 

James, 220. 
Heggans, John, 613. 
Henderson, Alexander, 220. 

Rev. D., 32, 177. 
Thomas, 401. 

William, 241. 
Hendersone, Robert, 55. 
Hendry, Charles, 397, 465. 

- John, 459, 464. 
Henry, James, 224. 

William, 220. 

Herbert, Colonel, 515, ct seq. 
Herb' 1 , Robert, 221. 
Hervie, Patrick, 221. 

Peter, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259. 
Hewit, Edward, 290. 

Francis, 463. 

I ley wood, John, 380. 

Hickson, John, 340, 343, 349, 350, 351, 

353. 354, 35. 358, 362, 363, 365, 

367. 

Billhead, 299. 
Hilltown, 299. 
Ilizzlehead, 237, 249, 257. 
Ilolyrood, 186, 187, 188, 192, 401. 
Home, Alexander, 327. 
Lord, 279, 282. 

Houstone, Mr. Alexander, 532. 
Howe, Edward, 450. 
Howison, Andrew, 223, 
Hughes, Capt., 514, et seq, 
hunter, Al., 13. 
Hunter, Alexander, 40. 

- John, 451. 

- Mrs., 224. 
Huntly, 59. 

- Castle, 301. 

- Marquis of, 49, 59- 
Iluske, General, 323. 
Hutcheon, David, 457. 

Inash, William, 17. 

Inchrory, 490, 491, 492, 494, 507, 508, 

543, 544, 545, 546- 
Inderchadden, see Indeshadden. 
Indeshadden, 539, 540, 541. 
Ingram, William, 472, 476. 
Innersnait, 148. 
Inncs, Beroald, 34. 

Charles, of Belnaboth, 21, 23. 

Sir H., 145. 



638 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Innes, J., of Sinnahard, 21, 23. 

Jno., 272. 

- John, 405. 
Innesour, 541. 
Inoch, Lodvick, 1 6. 

Thomas, 16. 
Inveran, 511. 
Inveraven, see Inverernan. 
Inveravon, 34, 37. 

Invercald, 4, 9, 23, 120, 507, 521. 

Laird of, 170, 517, 543. 
Inverchat, 20, 23. 
Invcrcomery, 541, 570, 577, 582. 
Inverera, 499, 510. 
Inverernan, 4, 20, 23. 
Inverery, 555. 

Invereshie, 508. 

Inverey, 10. 

Inverichbel, 18. 

Inverlaidnan, 492. 

Inverlochy, 155, 600, 602, 606. 

Invermorriston, I. 

Inverness, 34, 35, 134, 138, 140, 141, 142, 
143. 145. 148, 149, 'SO, 239, 257, 
265, 315. 320, 323, 333. 335. 369, 
387, 388, 394, 395, 400, 401, 403, 
407, 409, 410, 412, 515, 602, 606. 

Invernettie, 14, 20, 23. 

Invernochtie, 14, 21. 

Inversanday, 534. 

Inversnade, 514, 552, 571, 578, 583. 

Inverury, 231, 257, 258, 301, 302, 303, 488. 

Irons, Robert, 438, 478. 

Irvine, Alexander, 318. 

- Alexander, 390, 397, 434, 460, 465. 

Lieut., 514. 
Thomas, 222. 

Irvines, James, 222, 235, 244, 256, 262, 

263, 264. 
Irving, Ensign, 548, 572. 

Jackson, Colonel, 274, 275, 278. 
James V., passim. 

V\., flassirn. 

John, 16. 

Jay, Thomas, 377, 441, 442, 443, 444, 446. 

Jan, 614. 

Jedburgh, 372. 

Jeffray, Rev. A., 66, 93, 94, 100, 101, 102, 

103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 

no. 

- George, 101, 105, 263. 

Joddrel, Mr., 391, 456, 465, 470, 474, 476. 
Johnston, Rev. Alexander, 100, 123, 622. 

Alexander, 222. 

- And., 410, 438, 454, 456, 459, 482. 

James, 235, 259, 260, 261. 

Robert, 613. 



Johnston, William, 195, 212, 215, 216, 

218, 222, 267. 
Joyne, John, 256. 
Joyner, Robert, 221, 263, 266. 

Kaie, Alaster, 10. 

Duncan, 10. 

Grigor, 10. 

James, 10. 

John, 10. 
Kamdillvaih, 545. 

Kamerk, Pat., alias Stuart, 18. 
Kay, James, 10. 

William, 10. 
Kea, Mr., 157. 
Keam Hill, 299. 
Keapoch, see Keppoch. 

Lady, 519. 
Keig, 66, 67, 68, 69, 78, 80, 82, 84, 87, 88, 

89, 90, 91. 92, 622. 
Keith, 34. 

George, 51, 221. 
Kelles, AI. and Wm. , 14. 
Kellie, Earl of, 339, 340, 346. 
Kelluahn, 514. 

Kelly, Alexander, 222. 

- George, 296. 

William, 225. 
Kelso, 372. 
Kemnay, 88. 

Kemno, Joseph, 236, 256. 
Kendal, 284, 285, 360, 370, 372, 406. 
Kenethmont, see Kinethmont. 
Kenna, Joseph, 245. 
Kennedy, Alexander, 537. 

- Archibald, 537. 
Hugh, 393. 

John, 581, 613. 

Keppoch, 134, 143, 144, 154, 155, 156, 
168, 314, 346, 359, 403, 404, 519, 

535, 536- 

Ker, John, 594, 595. 
Kern, 65. 
Kerr, All., 20, 23. 

Colonel Henry, 367, 386, 388. 

Lieut., 400. 

Lord Mark, 239, 248, 299, 303, 310, 

323- 

Lord Robert, 314. 
Kers, 167. 

Kesson, William, 15. 

Kildrummie, 55, 56, 57, 58, 66, 113, 114, 

115, 117, 119, 120,121, 123,398, 

622. 

Mains of, 114, I2O, 121. 

Mill of, 114, 121. 
Nether, 114, uS, 120, 121. 

Kilewn, 145. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



639 



Kilgour, Patrick, 220. 

Killenann, 581. 

Killichassy, 314. 

Killihnimen, 141, 142, 149, 150, 163, 164. 

Killin, 520, 524, 526, 577. 

Killison, Mr., 312. 

Kilmarnock, 326, 366, 367, 609, 6tl. 

Lord, 313, 322, 323, 372. 
Kilravock, 145. 
Kilwinning, 592. 
Killycranky, 520, 524. 

Kincardine (Kincardine O'Neil), 20, 21, 

22, 242, 270, 306. 
Kindrochit, 602. 
Kinethmont, 232, 622. 
Kingairloch, 555, 566. 
Kingerloch, Laird of, 548. 
Kinghorn, 126. 
Kingour, James, 223. 
Kingston, 301, 303, 311. 
Kingswells, 299. 
Kinloch, Charles, 437. 

Sir James, 477. 

Lady, 314. 

Lady, of Nevie, 610. 
Kinlochbegg, 518. 
Kinlocheil, 185. 
Kinlochleven, 562. 
Kinlochoom, 535. 
Kinnachan, 539, 540, 541. 

Bridge, 577. 
Kinstair, 21, 23, 86, 101, 109. 
Kintail, 139, 172, 526, 548, 581. 
Kintoir, 49. 

Kintore, Lord, 96, 301. 

Kippen, 239. 

Kirkaldie, 126. 

Kirkhill, 271. 

Kirkmichael, 34, 547, 578. 

Kirkmortlich, 546. 

Knap, 535. 

Knevit, Capt., 378, 379, 436, 442, 448, 

45'. 463- 
Knochlin, 537. 
Knockespock, 21. 
Knock fin, 549. 

Knoidart, 143, 501, 509, 510, 535. 
Knowes, James, 221. 
Knowhead, 114, 118. 
Knows, Robert, 256, 269. 

William, 256, 269. 
Krastrekay, 545. 

Kraw, Duncan, 385. 
Kynoch, 223, 269. 

Ladiyame, James, 8. 
, Laflesh, Francis, 219. 
Laggan, 501, 549, 555, 558, S^o, 566, 570. 



Lagganachadrom, 514, 515, 536, 537, 548, 

555, 557, 566, 573, 58, S*i- 
Lagganamhearlich, 507. 
Lamg, John, 221. 

William, 101, 104. 
Laird, John, 241. 
Lamb, William, 225. 
Lamond, Euphemie, 239. 

Lancaster, 284, 285, 295, 359, 365, 372, 

377- 

Largs, 171. 

Lascelle, Colonel, 280. 
Laso, 21. 
Latheron, 412. 
Lauchlan Castle, 361. 
Laudakin, 539, 541. 
Lauder, 282, 386. 

- Archibald, 390, 397, 434, 460, 465, 

471. 

George, 611. 
Lauderdale, Earl of, 25. 
Lauson, James, 220. 
Laurance, John, 272. 
Law, George, 611. 

James, 13. 

Rev. Mr., 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 245. 
Lawarnance, William, 14. 
Laws, 23. 
Lawson, Alex., 101, 103, 256, 270, 271. 

John, 256, 270. 
Lead Nabraylay, 540. 
Leask, Rev. Mr., 62, So, 89. 
Leath, Alexander, 471. 
Lecht, 545. 
Ledmacay, 14. 
Lee, C. J.,436. 

Colonel, 280. 

Charles James, 404. 

Major, 575. 

Leek, 284, 289, 341, 348, 367, 372. 

Roy, 515, 537, 549. 
Legg, James, 224. 

Legonier, General, 300, 303, 483. 
Leiper, James, 219, 232. 
Leitch, James, 223. 

Robert, 223. 

Leith, 126, 148, 151, 152, 398, 399, 607. 

- Alexander, 114, 120. 

- J., of Whithaiigh, 23. 

James, 472. 

John, 20, 22, 23. 

Walter, 219, 225. 

William, 270, 271. 

William, of Whithaugh, 20. 
Leithhall, 20, 23. 

Lendrum, John, 225. 

Leochel, 88, 89, go, gi, 92, 622. 

Lesley, Major, 529. 



640 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Lesly, George, 333. 
Leslie, 23. 

Baillie, 197, 206, 212, 214, 216, 217. 
Charles, 389, 397, 409, 410, 459, 

464, 472, 482. 

George, 220, 224, 229. 

John, 43, 45, 215, 218, 224. 

Lieut., 531. 
Margaret, 223. 

Patrick, 224. 

William, 222, 223. 
Lessendrum, 301. 
Levistone, Donald, 611. 
Lewis, 139, 143, 145, 169. 
Ley, William, 41. 
Leyes, Francis, 221, 233. 

Thomas, 221, 233. 
Leys, Laird of, 7 1 , 96. 
Ligertwood, James, 223. 
Lindsay, James, 458. 

Mr., 126. 

William, 39, 48. 
Lindsey, James, 61 1. 
Linlithgow, 295, 298. 
Linsey, John, 564, 565. 

Robert, 564, 565. 
Lintrathen, 554. 
Lismore, 128. 
Livingstone, Rev. A., 66, el set], 

Sir James, 239. 
Loanhead, 258. 

Lochaber, 143, 171, 308, 336, 394, 495, 

S8, 534- 

Lochandimalag, 540. 
Locharkeg, 509, 518, 534, 554, 555, 557, 

572, 579- 
Loch Avach, 570. 
Lochavin, 507, 508. 
Loch Hall, 541. 
Lochbroom, 145, 172. 
Lochbuilg, 507. 
Lochcarron, 172. 
Loch in Dolet, 534. 
Lochdurn, I. 
Lochelsh, 172. 
Locheroch, 540, 541. 
Loch Garry, 358, 537, 539. 
Loch I loom, 535, 536. 
Lochiel, 143, 144, 174, 298, 332, 333, 

334, 336, 346, 349, 356, 393, 394, 
r 395, 396. 
Loch Katharine, 542. 
Loch Leven, 518, 539, 540, 541. 
Loch Morra, 534, 535, 536. 
Lochnagowr, 507. 
Lochnashien, 507. 
Lochness, 141. 
Loch Nevis, 535. 



Lochnowa, 548. 

Loch Quick, 537. 

Loch Rannoch, 539, 540, 541, 570. 

Loch Shiel, 534. 

Loch Yeol, 533, 534. 

Lochy, Lake, 164. 

Lockhart, George, of Carnwath, 362, 363. 

Logan, George, 223. 

William, 223. 

Logic, Andrew, 195, 230, 233, 235, 269, 
270, 271. 

James, 339, 342, 345, 364, 368, 369, 

370. 

Loman, 517, 542. 
London, 60, 89, 153. 
Long Island, 517. 
Longforgan, 126. 
Longlands, David, 224. 
Lonmay, 204, 209, 211, 213, 216, 217, 345. 
Lonsdale, Lord, 285. 
Lorn, 168. 
Loudon, Earl of, 25, 263, 279, 282, 388, 

487, 54, 5i- 
Lovat, Lord, 131, 134, 144, 145, 156, 331, 

332, 333, 343, 535- 

Master of, 334, 336, 343, 412. 
Low, John, 400. 

Lowther, 285. 

Loyd, Sir Richard, 332. 

Lucca, 599. 

Luckie, John, 236, 245, 256. 

William, 237, 256. 
Ludlow Castle, 310. 
Lumphanan, 270, 622. 
Lumsdale, Andrew, 371. 

William, 371. 
Lumsden, David, 55. 

H., 21, 55. 

Rev. James, 622. 
John, 221, 226. 
Rev. John, 622. 

Liiiian, John, 9. 
Lundey, James, 224. 
Lundie, Laird of, 560. 
Lundin, William, 224, 225. 
Lyn, 238. 
Lyon, Lord, 401. 

Mr., 126. 

MacAndrew, John, 612. 
Mcandrew, Donald, 12. 

James, 12. 

John, 12. 

MacArthur, of Glenluigh, 581. 
MckArthur, John, 18. 
MacAurie, John, 612. 
MacBain, John, 612. 
Mackbain, 171. 



1 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



641 



McBain, Pat., 16. 

McBane, Major, 314. 

McBean, Francis, 569. 

MacCormack, Ormesby, 377, 436, 440, 443. 

MacCulloch, Evan, 614. 

Mackulloch, Roderick, 231, 259, 263. 

McCulloch, David, 263. 

Patrick, 239. 
Macdonald, Alaster, 548. 

Alexander, of Glenco, 346, 360. 

Alexander, of Keppoch, 346. 

Augus, 613. 

Donald, of Clanronald, 356, 357, 

372- 

Donald, of Lochgarrie, 358. 

Donald, 434. 

Duncan, 469, 482. 

John, 405, 486, 611, 612, 613, 614. 

Sir]., 346. 

Roger, 377, 387, 392, 397,409,411, 
433. 454, 455, 45^, 460, 468, 477- 
479, 481, 611. 

of Greenfield, 523. 
Mackdonald, of Barrisdale, 257, 359. 
McDonald, Alester, 10. 

Sir Alexander, 333. 

Alexander, 223, 224, 231, 256, 555. 

Angus, 10, 515. 

- Colonel, of Keppoch, 314. 
Donald, 555. 

John, 10, 583. 

Roderick, 22. 

Thomas, 231, 256. 

of Lochgary, 568. 

of Luke, 581. 

McDonalds, 134, 143, 144, 145, 155, 168, 

172, 174. 
Mckdonald, Allaster, 21, 22, 24, 25. 

Angus, 21, 22. 

John, 21, 22. 
William, 12. 

Macdonell, Archibald, of Keppoch, 359, 

372. 

McDonall, Donall, 566. 
McDonel, Alester, 537. 
McDonell, Alexander, 537. 
Hugh, 549. 

John, 537, 581. 

Saunders, 568. 
MacDougal, John, 613. 
MacDougals, 155, 168, 172. 
MacDowgall, John, 614. 

MacDugall, Hugh, 377, 384, 390, 434, 441, 

452, 461, 465. 

Mackdougal, Daniel, 237, 249, 256. 
McDougall, Alaster, 10. 

John, 10. 

Laird of, 156. 



Macfarlane, Capt. , 195, 233, 239. 

Mackfarlands, 169. 

McFarlan, Daniel, 384, 389, 434, 461, 464. 

Mcfarland, William, 15. 

MacGhie (Maggee), William, 390, ct seq. 

MacGillavrae, Farquhar, 613. 

Mackgillivray, 171. 

McGillivray, Colonel, 313, 369. 

McGilivie, Donald, 9. 

John, 9, II. 
McGilvry, Donald, 9. 
MckGillavvie, Alaster, 9. 

Donald, 9. 
Mckgillewie, Allaster, II. 

Andrew, 10. 

Collen, 10. 
Donald, 9, II. 

James, 10. 

John, 9, 10. 

Patrick, II. 
Mckaliway, Alexander, 13. 
MacGoary, Niel, 614. 
Macgregor, Donald, 519. 

Duncan, 515, 526, 611. 
Mackgregor, John, 236, 245, 257. 
MackGregors, 172. 
McGregors, 134. 
McGrigor, Andrew, 9. 

Donald, 9. 

- Grigor, 8. 

Macgrowther, Alexander, 384. 389. 
Maclnnes, Archibald, 614. 
Mclnnes, Rev. John, 622. 
Maclntire, John, 612. 
Macintosh, Alexander, 611. 

Francis, 613. 

Lachlan, 611. 
Lady (Old), 610. 

William, 613. 
Mackintosh, Lauchlan, 369. 
Mclntosh, Eneas, 566. 

Brigadier, 159. 
Donald, 10. 

Duncan, 8. 
John, 10, II. 
Lculy, 313, 314, 610. 

Laird of, 156, 168, 171. 
Mr., 34. 

Mclntoshes, 143, 144, 155, 171, 172, 369. 
Maclnven, Laird of, 155. 
Mackay, Capt., 512. 

- General, 603. 
Jascol, 614. 

John, 470. 
Robert, 613. 

Mackays, 172, 245. 
Mackie, James, 197, 225. 
Hugh, 221, 267. 



3 



6 4 2 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Mackie, Patrick, 68. 

McKay, George, 223. 

Mackey, Robert, 438, 457, 478. 

Mackenny, Capt., 412. 

Mackenzie, Alexander, of Corie, 402. 

- Colin, 548. 

Dugwal, 612. 
Evan, 614. 

Hector, 469. 
Hugh, 612. 

James, 6n. 

John, 206, 215, 218, 222, 393, 411, 
613. 

William, 206, 215, 218, 219, 613. 
Mackenzies, 134, 143, 145, 154, 172, 326. 
McKenzie, Sir Alexander, of Coul, 54S. 

- Alexander, of Fairliour, 548. 

- Alexander, n, 222. 

- Archibald, II. 

- Colonel, 314. 

Rev. Daniel, 31, 33, 35, 37. 
Donald, u, 13. 
Duncan, II. 

James, n, 596. 

John, of Applecross, 548. 
John, 10, ii. 

Keneth, 395, 589, 590, 591. 
Kenneth, of Dalmore, n. 

- Margaret, 549. 
Mrs., 124. 

Rev. William, 622. 

Mackinnon, Angus, 356, 357, 358, 359, 
360, 361, 362. 

John, of Mackinnon, 361. 
Mackinnons, 169, 172, 174. 
Mackinson, John, 397, 405. 
MacLachan, John, 612. 
MacLachlan, Colonel, til. 

John, 612. 
MacLauchlan, Allan, 394. 

Alexander, Major, 392, 393. 

Lauchlan, 361. 
Macklachlans, 168, 172. 
McLauchlan, Alexander, 537. 
McClocklan, Hugh, 393. 
Mckl.achlan, Donald, 9. 

lames, IS. 

- John, 18. 

Mcklauciian, Duncan, iS. 
Maclaren, 1'eter, 386. 
Maclaurin, Mrs., 328. 
MacLean, Donald, 613. 

John, 612, 613. 

Lachlan, 612. 

Macklean, John, 237, 249, 256. 
McLean, Donald, 16. 

Hector, 555. 

Sir Hector, 156, 167. 



McLean, John, 555. 

John, Jr., 555. 

Mr., 533. 

William, 239. 

McLeans, 143, 144, 155, 167, 172, 174, 393. 
Macleod, Alexander, 370, 613. 

Dugwal, 612. 

Ewan, 470. 

John, 370. 
McLeod, Mr. John, 333. 

Laird of, 333, 337, 338. 
Lord, 313, 402, 411, 412, 488. 

Norman, 548, 550, 566. 

of Arnisdale, 572. 

McLeods, 143, 144, 145, 169, 172, 174. 
McLeud, Capt., I. 
McCloud, Duncan, 523. 
MacMillan, Miles, 555. 

Neil, 395, 396. 
McMillan, John, 566. 
MacQueen, Donald, 611. 
Mackqueen, 171. 
Mckqueen, John, 17. 

William, 17. 
MacPherson, Ewan, of Clunie, 360. 

Donald, 395. 

- James, 613. 

Robert, 257. 
McPherson, Capt., 306. 

Grigor, 550. 

John, 570, 582. 

Laird of, 156. 

Mr., of Killyhantly, 570. 
McPhersone, All., II. 

James, 8, 10. 

John, ii. 

McPhersons, 143, 144, 155, 171, 172. 
McPhie, Donal, 580. 

John, 555. 

MacRea, Donald, 612. 
Machray, James, 225. 
McRas, 143. 
MacRobert, Ronald, 15. 
Mack, John, 17. 
Mackallea, Thomas, 16. 
Mackamos, John, 17. 
Mackauly, , 17. 
Mackiklery, Patrick, 17. 
Mackmack, John, 17. 
Mack-Callen-More, 167. 
Macknails, 169. 
McNeills, 143. 
Macknabs, 169. 
Macknachtens, 169. 
McNaughten, Colonel, 314. 
McAchran, Donald, 555. 
Mcalester, John, 16. 
Mcarrar, ffindlay, 10 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



643 



McCartney, Archibald Bain, 515. 
Mcgibbon, Thomas, 9. 
Mchardie, Alaster, 11. 

- Alexander, 13. 

Charles, 12. 

ffindlay, 12. 

- George, 8. 
James, 10. 

Robert, 8, 12. 

William, to. 
McHardie, John, 8, 9, 10, 12. 
Mclnriach, 21. 
Mclntailor, John, 16. 
McKillichnich, John, 568, 569. 
McLays, 143. 
McLennans, 143. 
McMartin, Dougal, 393. 
McMartins, 169. 
McMaster, Alexander, 393. 
McOmie, Margaret, 224. 
Mckomie, Elizabeth, 223. 
McRobie, James, 15. 
Mkrobie, John, 17. 
Mckallum, Andrew, 10. 
Mckanarch, Alaster, 9. 
Mckarrell, John, 9. 
Mckarrie, John, 10. 
MckChristan, All., 14. 
Mckgeorge, John, 18. 
Mckgillendrish, John Stewart, 18. 
Mcklea, John, 18. 

Mklea, Andrew, 16. 
Mckmarstin, John, 18. 
Mckmlailor, John, 10. 
Mckmweig, Alaster, 10. 

John, 10. 

Mckmweigmay, Robert, 10. 
Mckomish, John, 18. 
MckRitchie, Robert, 16. 
Mckrory, John, 9. 
Mcksiver, James, 10. 

- John, 10. 
Mckyoak, Hercules, 15. 

John, 15. 

William, 15. 
Mkessach, John, 16. 
Mkgoak, James, 16. 

Macclesfield, 284, 341, 348, 349, 353, 361, 

372, 377, 379, 439- 
Maghie, Hugh, 224. 
Maddock (Madox), Samuel, 375, et seq. 
Main, George, 225. 

John, 237, 249, 257. 
Mair, John, 215, 218, 223. 
Maitland, Brigadier, 26. 

Charles, 623. 

John, 225. 
Malcolm III., 602. 



Malcolm, John, 460. 

William, 225. 
Man, Isle of, 222. 

Manchester, 284, 290, 292, 352, 354, 372, 
375, 376, 379, 382, 388, 402, 407, 
408, 439. 

Mar, 170, 540. 

Earl of, 7, 8, 23, 28, 29, 43, 44, 45, 
46, 47, 49, 55- 56, 57, 59, 60, >i. 

Ill, 113, 114, Il8, 119, I2O, 121, 
602, 604. 

- (or Mair), Alexander, 237, 249, 257. 
Marchmonnt, Chancellor, 25. 

Marc, William, 55. 
Marnach, John, 101, 105. 
Marr, William, 589, 591. 
Marryburgh, 573. 
Martin, , 247. 

John, 225. 

William, 220. 
Marline, John, 257. 
Maryculter, 259. 

Mason. John, 223, 245, 254, 255, 409, 612. 
Massie, Francis, 225. 
Masson, J., 236, 256, 257, 258, 259, 265. 
Masterton, Malcolm, 613. 
Mather, Charles, 437, 478. 
Matheson, Mr., of Farnaig, 556, 558. 
Matthewson, Andrew, 225. 

Patrick, 225. 
Maul, Mr., 238. 
Mavis, John, 299. 
Mawie, 395, 396. 
Maxwell, Don., 8. 

James, 8. 

Lieut., 533, 536, 547, 548, 565, 

566, 572, 579, 5So. 

Kev. John, 622. 

Robert, 617, 618, 619. 
May, Alaster, 6. 

James, 10. 

John, 12. 

Mearns, John, 222. 
Mcdleton, Alexander, 223. 
Meldrum, 301. 

Donald, 17. 

George, 223. 

- Old, 301, 302, 303. 
Melen, John, 221. 
Melford, Earl of, 482, 486. 
Melven, John, 225. 
Melvill, Francis, 46. 
President, 25. 
Melvin, George, 221. 

Robert, 220. 
William, 238, 249, 257. 

Melvine, Alexander, 238, 249, 257. 
Melvyl, William, 220. 



644 



INDEX OF NAMES ANi) PLACES. 



Menzies, Alexander, 237, 256, 257. 

- Capt., 510. 

- Colonel, 314. 

Francis, 225. 

George, 326. 
James, 17. 
John, 221, 255. 

Mr., of Culldcars, 583. 

Sir Robert, 170, 306, 516, 539, 540. 

William, 223, 257. 

- of Culdain, 562. 

- of Pitfodels, 238, 249, 251, 257, 269. 
Menzieses, 170, 172. 

Mercer, Col., of Adie, 314. 

James, 304. 
Robert, 351. 

Mergie, 272. 
Merry, George, 614. 
Mestin, John, 219, 268. 
Mcstine, James, 219. 
Meyncll, Mr., 288, 290. 
Michie, Allan, 15. 

James, 221. 

Ro., 622. 
Michy, John, 15, 530. 
Micmcs, Robert, 225. 
Micras, 12. 
Middleton, James, 612. 

John, 41, 53, 219. 
Middletone, Dr. George, 593. 
Midleton, Baillie, 215, 218, 229, 239. 

Mr., 312. 

- Samuel, 268. 

William, 195, 197, 215, 218, 221. 
Midletone, Rev. Mr., 6S, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92. 
Midlton, Mr., 278. 

- of Seaton, 247. 
Mid mar, 622. 
Milard, James, 13. 
Millan, Clark, 516. 
Mill, Andrew, 612. 
Mills, John, 398. 
Miln, Alaster, 14. 

James, 269. 

John, 13- 

Rev. Will., 622. 
Milne, Alexander, 222. 
James, 15. 

- John, 15, 224. 
Thomas, 15. 

William, 222, 225. 
Minnimore, 18. 
Mimjig, Alexander, 223. 
Missel, , 531. 
Mitchel, Sir Andrew, 328. 

- George, 237, 249, 257. 

- James, 237, 249, 257. 
Mitchell, Alexander, 34, 195, 215, 222. 



Mitchell, Rev. Alexander, 592, 594. 

- George, 101, 102, 586. 
James, 12. 

John, 12. 

Robert, 222. 

Thomas, 47, 48, 53, 2 1 8, 592, 594. 

Walter, 475. 

William, 86, ico. 

Moidart, 143, 144, 145, 168, 334, 495, 509, 

510. 
Moir (Mor), Allaster, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27. 

- Alexander, of Scotstoune, 43. 

Andrew, 222. 

- Capt. Charles, 256. 
Francis, 75, 86, 100. 

- George, 225. 

Henry, 402. 

James, 224, 262. 

James, of Stoneywood, 43, 207, 210, 

254, 255, 256, 270. 

Robert, 402. 

William, II, 224, 227, 255, 256, 
257, 258, 259, 345, 585, 586, 587. 

William, of Lonmay, 204, 207, 209, 

210, 211, 216, 217, 228. 
Mol'tat, 372, 399, 409. 

John, 558. 

Moleson, Alexander, 220. 
Molesworth, Capt., 536, el sty. 
Mollyson, Francis, 221. 

form, 216. 
Monaltrie, 8, 368. 
Moncrief, D., 221. 
Mongomerie, Lord, 25. 
Monk, General, 602. 

- Joseph, 475. 

Monro, General Sir Robert, 295, 300, 302, 

33- 

Mr., 567. 

William, 612. 
Monteith, 169. 

Montrose, 125, 194, 239, 246, 251, 257, 
275, 400, 401, 606. 

Duke of, 31, 32, 169, 514, 577. 
Monymusk, 310. 
Moody, Lieut., 514, 527. 
Moore, Lieut., 389, et scq. 
Moorisone, James, 592, 594. 
Moray (Murray), 30, 35, 143, 145, 400. 
Mordaunt, Brigadier, 302, 303. 
More, Gilbert, 224. 

John, 15. 
Morgan, A., 12. 

- Capt., 274, 275, 277, 278. 
David, 448. 

Donald, II. 

James, 12. 

John, 12. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



645 



Morice, John, 14. 
Morison, Alexander, 613. 

Provost James, 195, 196, 197, 198, 

200, 207, 209, 210, 230, 231, 233, 
235, 250, 252, 265, 266. 

John, 612. 
Morker, George, 457. 
Morlich, 114, 117, 118, 120. 
Morra, 534, 535, 579. 

South, 533, 547, 585. 
Morren, William, 13. 
Morret, George, 13. 
Morrien, Al., 13. 
Morrice John, 222. 
Morris, Major, 310. 
Morrison, James, 385. 
Mortimer, James, 438, 456. 

William, 101, 105. 
Morton, Earl of, 7, 146. 

Mr., 401. 
Morven, 507. 
Morvine, 143, 509. 

Mosman, Thomas, 195, 215, 218, 22;, 254. 
Mosset, 114, 120. 
Moss, Peter, 449. 
Moton, John, 273. 
Mouatt, George, 222. 
Mouchall, Andrew, 613. 
Mowat, George, 41, 53, 195, 212, 213, 214, 
215, 216, 217, 218, 226. 

W., 48, 195, 206, 208, 219, 230, 

2 33, 235, 265, 266, 267, 271, 272, 

3'2. 

Moy, 34, 171. 
Muggen, Alaster, 14. 
Muick, 143. 
Muilson, James, 14. 

John, 14. 
Muirtoun, 331. 
Mulcest, John, 14. 
Mull, Isle of, 509. 
Mullig, 535. 
Munro, Colonel, 145. 

Donald, 394, 403, 411, 469. 

Sir Henry, 510. 
Mr., 145. 

Sheriff, 575. 
Munros, 144, 172. 
Munroe, Sir Hary, 239. 
Munzie, Alexander, 237, 254, 256. 
Murchieson, Donald, 139. 

148. 

Murchisons, 143. 
Murdoch, George, 613. 

(Murdo), William, 221, 235, 244, 

258, 262, 264. 
Murray, Colonel, 280. 
Earl of, 169. 



Murray, Lord George, 285, 288, 298, 308, 

340, 343. 344, j6l, 367, 37, 372, 
386, 387, 388, 394. 

John, 223. 

- John, of Broughton, 185, 186, 187, 
188, 192, 193, 352, et seq. 

Lord John, 306, 400. 
Lady, 288, 347. 

Mr., 331, 332, 336, 337, 338. 

Sherift of, 29. 

William, 220, 234, 239, 242, 244. 

William, of Taymont, 409. 
Musselburgh, 279, 392. 

Nairn, 34, 145, 318, 319, 404. 

of Aldie, 351. 

John, 15. 

Lord, 288, 347, 349, 372. 

, Paymaster, 6n. 

Robert, 225, 271, 272, 437, 478. 

Thomas, 613. 
Napier, Colonel, 547. 

Ness, Lake, 148, 149, 163, 164. 

Netherall, George, 558, 559. 

Nevie, 16. 

New, 504. 

Newbigging, 21, 23. 

Newcastle, 283, 284, 387, 399, 400. 

Duke of, 483. 

under Line, 295, 348. 
Newdi<;ate, Charles, 475. 
Ncwhills, 299. 
Nicholson, James, 433. 
Nicol, Baillie, 215, 218. 

John, 614. 
Nicoll, James, 45, 46, 224. 

Thomas, 226. 

Wai., 223, 237, 250, 275. 
Nicolson, Mr. (Rev.), 256, 269, 271. 
Niven, James, 250. 

Thomns, 40, 45. 
Nivie, James, 225, 231. 
Noel, Mr., 332. 
Northesk, Lord, 25. 
Norrie, , 221. 

Francis, 109. 

Peter, 101, 104. 
Nottingham, 290, 292. 

Obrian, Captain, 232. 
Ochterlony, D., 236, 265. 
Og, Arthur, 14. 

John, 14. 
Oge, Ewin, 581. 

John, 581. 
Ogilby, John, 585, 586, 587. 

Patrick, 585, 587. 
Ogilvie, David, 231, 258. 



646 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Ogilvie, James, 224, 233. 
John, II. 

Lady, 288, 314, 610. 

Lord, 308, 313, 346, 349, 350, 352, 

372. 398. 399- 

Rev. Mr., 239. 

Ogilvy, John, 390, 396, 434, 452, 460, 471. 
Lieut., 546, 563, 564, 572, 579, 584. 
Ogston, Christian, 220. 
Oig, Rot., 14. 
Old Lerg, 15. 
Oldcastle, Sir John, 381. 
Oliphant, Charles, 400. 

Lawrence, of Gask, 351, 363, 364, 

365, 366. 

Lawrence, younger, 365, 366. 
Orack, James, 8. 

Ord, William, 586, 587, 591. 

Orkney, 146. 

Orem, Alexander, 622. 

Ormistoune, 52. 

Osborn, Alexander, 206, 215, 218, 220, 

221, 233. 
- John, 592, 594. 
Oven, .Master, 9. 
Ower, William, 10. 
Oxford, 362. 
Oyn, 88, 272. 

Paddokhall, IGI. 
I'anmure, 257. 
Panton, George, 34. 
Paris, 332. 
Parker, Karon, 618. 

James, 394. 482. 
1'aterson, KHz., 624. 

Rev. James, 622. 

James, 386, 409, 453, 468, 473, 479, 
480. 

Robert, 326. 

William, 225. 
1'atersone, James, 624. 
1'aton, George, 235, 236, 263, 264. 
Patrie, George, 128. 
Patton, Captain, 539, cl seq. 

Ensign, 533, ct scy. 
Paul], James, 220. 
Peebles, 372. 
1'elham, Mr., 307. 
Pennyciiik, 392. 

Penrith, 284, 285, 286, 357, 372, 373, 440. 
Perth, passim. 

Duke of, 169, 172, 247, 272, 288, 
296, 3'3, 323, 332, 333. 340, 346, 
347, 348, 349, 351, 370, 372, 384, 
385, 389, 39, 407, 624. 
Peterhead, 246, 248, 249, 256, 262, 264. 
Petrie, James, 198. 



Petrie, Lewis, 236, 267, 268. 

Petry, Coline, 114, 115. 

Pettie, 34. 

Petty, 318. 

Phillips, Captain Richard, 526, cl seq. 

Piery, Alexander, 114, 121, 122. 

Pirie, Alexander, 219. 

Pitfoddels, 238, 249, 255, 268, 269. 

Pitmuckstown, 299. 

Pitsligo, Lord, 249, 288, 308, 341, 346, 

372, 406, 407, 448. 
Pittandlich, 114, 117. 
Pittendreigh, Robert, 43. 
Pollock, Mr., 238. 
Pollturie, 507. 
Portlethen, 195. 
Portsmouth, 619. 
Portsoy, 238, 303. 
Powell, Captain, 514, ct stq. 
Premnay, 238. 
Preston, 55, 58, 284, 285, 295, 359, 365, 

372, 377, 378, 389, 407- 
-Grange, 607. 
Brigadier, 60. 
Prestonpans, 279, 280, 281, 291, 333, 347, 

36S, 372, 375, 387, 392, 397, 398, 

409, 410. 

Price, Captain, 513, et seq. 
Proctor, Alexander, 223. 

- George, 223. 
William, 223. 

1'uerdessel, Thomas, 474. 
Pulteney, General, 514, et set/. 

Ouech, River, 543. 
(Jueensberrie, Marquis of, 7. 

Rae, James, 55. 

- Lord, 172. 
Ragg, Alexander, 41. 

Thomas, 589. 
Railly, James, 466. 
Kainie, George, 223. 
Rait, William, 68, 125. 
Ramsay, Charles, 231, 258. 

David, 614. 

- George, 476. 
Rev., 34. 

Ramsden, Mr., 399. 

Rannoch, 491, 495, 498, 499, 512, 514, 

S'6, 519, 539, 550, 55", 562, 573, 

577, 582. 
Rantsantrish, 13. 
Ratra, John, 9. 
Ratry, William, 12. 
Rattray, John, 611. 
Rayven, 547. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



647 



Reach, Alexander, 390, 396, 406, 434, 460, 
464,468, 471,475- 

John, 399, 480, 482. 
Read, see Reid. 

Captain, 351, 364. 

General, 279. 
Reay, Lord, 411. 
Redcliffe, 353. 
Redings, 283. 

Reed, William, 410, 473. 
Reid, Charles, 57, 58, 120. 

P'francis, 15. 

James, 68, 80, 114, 117. 

John, 226. 
Mrs., 125. 

P., 220. 

Rev. Pat., 622. 

Pat., of Haughton, 21, 23. 

Rev. Robert, 55, 231, 256, 266. 

Rev. Thomas, 622. 
William, 15, 231, 258. 

Reidfoord, 259. 
Reisgill, 412. 
Reith, Mr. George, 53. 
Renach, Grigor, 9. 
Renny, Alexander, 470. 

James, 391. 
Restalrig, 370. 
Reynolds, C. J., 436. 
Rhume, 143. 

Riach, Alexander, 12, 14, 17. 

Allaster, 21. 

Donald, 13, 22. 
James, 14. 

- John, 8, 12, 13, 14, 17. 

Pligsher, 14. 
William, 12, 14, 17. 

Ribbalachlagan, 490, 492, 494, 506, 507, 

543- 

Riccarby, 399. 
Rich, Colonel, 534. 
Rickart, David, of Ricknrtmmc, 4". 

John, 222. 
Rider, Sir Dudley, 331. 
Rigg, John, 224. 

Rin, John, 13. 
Ritchie, John, 223. 

Lauchlan, 613. 

Peter, 101, 105, 106. 

- Will., of Bogunquill, 21, 23. 
Ritchy, Andrew, of Frosterhill, 48. 
Riven, see Ruthven. 

Rivett, Mme., 288. 
Robb, James, 75. 

Robertson, Alexander, 237, 258, 271. 
Alexander, of Strowan, 159. 

- Alexander, Provost, 95, 212, 214, 

216, 217, 230, 235, 237, 249. 



Robertson, Andrew, 400. 

Betie, 223. 

Captain, 551. 

George, 219. 

- Gilbert, 224. 

James, 221, 224, 262, 263. 
John, Provost, 195, 208, 212, 214, 
216, 217, 223, 229, 230, 235, 299. 

Rev. John, 66, no, in, 112, 113. 

John, 224, 614. 
William, 239, 612. 

Robertsone, Alexander, 8, 16. 

Angus, 17. 

Donald, II. 
Dun., 8. 

- George, 43, 45. 

John, II. 
Peter, 16. 
William, 8, 17. 

Robertsons, 143, 144, 172. 
Robinson, Alexander, 519. 

Mr. Andrew, 404, 411. 437, 477. 

- Andrew, 455, 480. 
Rev. James, 470. 

Rockley, 283. 
Rodgers, Captain, 466. 
Rods, James, 272. 
Roinach, 501. 
Rolland, Margaret, 223. 
Rollo, of Row House, 346. 
Roily, Mr., 333. 
Rome, 1 80, 181. 
Konaldson, James, 612. 
Rose, Alexander, 220, 318. 

Dr., 212, 214, 216, 218. 

Francis, 225. 

George, 222. 

Walter, 222. 
Rosehall, 239. 
Roshill, 21, 23. 

Ross of Cloak, 20, 23. 

Earl of, 168, 172. 

Shire of, 134, 145, 403. 

General, 145. 

- of Kilravock, 145. 

- Alexander, 86, 109, 116. 

Alexander, of Pitcalnie, 370. 

Charles, 34. 

Corporal, 564. 

Donald, 612, 613. 

George, 56, 224. 

Hugh, 239, 404, 406, 408, 413, 469, 

474, 478, 482. 

Tames, Sen., 406, 479, 482. 
James, Jun., 406. 

John, 220, 223, 259. 
Malcolm, 370. 

Mr., 61, 145, 220. 



648 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



Ross, Patrick, 40. 

Ro., of Auchlossan, 20, 23. 

Robert, 224, 237, 249, 254, 255, 

256, 257, 258, 259. 

Mr. Thomas, 239. 

Walter, 412. 

William, 224. 
Rosses, 144, 170, 172. 
Rothes, Earl of, 129. 
Rotrey, Lewis, 18. 

Thomas, 12. 
Roy, Duncan, 9. 

John, 16, 21. 

William, 16, 612. 
Roye, Thomas, 564. 
Royolus, William, 17. 
Royston, Lord, 116. 
Rubislaw, 218, 258, 299. 
Russel, Alexander, 389, 393, 395, 456, 482. 

David, 258, 268, 269. 
Rutherford, Ensign, 544, 553, 563, 571, 

579, 584- 

Ruthven, of Badenoch, i, 142, 147, 165, 
247, 258, 269, 306, 394, 410, 495, 
499, 5io, S 12 , 5 r 5, 522, 538,539, 
550, 561, 569, 573,576,581, 582, 
600, 60 1, 602, 604, 606. 

Sadler-gate, 291. 
Sage, Angus, 586, 587, 590, 591. 
Salisbury, John, 558, 559. 
Sanderson, Captain, 457. 

John, 440. 

Rev. Joseph, 33, 35. 
Sandilands, P., 195, 225, 254. 

Robert, 272. 
Sangster, James, 221. 
Sanson, William, 41. 
Scone, 50. 

Scotsmill, 20, 21, 23. 
Scotstown, 299. 
Scott, Alexander, 222, 224. 

Captain, 528. 

Dam, 223. 

- George, 34, 231, 258. 
Dr. Hew, 123. 
James, 410, 473. 

John, 101, 103. 236, 245, 258, 457. 

Robert, 258. 
Thomas, 405. 
Walter, 407, 482. 

William, 224. 
Scotts, 167. 
Scrymgeour, Mr., 567. 

Seaforth, Earl of, 134, 139, 143, 144, 145, 

148, 172. 
Seaton, 239, 299. 
House, 279. 



Sempill, Lord, 237, 250, 255, 261, 276, 

277, 3o> 303, 333- 
Shand, Alexander, 405. 

George, 195, 206, 215, 218, 222. 

James, 88, 220. 

Thomas, 43, 45, 46, 49. 
Shap, 284, 285. 
Shardman, Joseph, 272. 
Sharp, Andrew, 269. 

- Captain, 554, 564, 565, 572. 
Shaw, /Eneas, 318. 

- Al., 10. 

- Alexander, 17. 

All., II. 

And., 9. 

Duncan, 9. 

James, 15. 

John, II, 12, 259, 567. 
Rev. Mr., 316. 

Thomas, 398. 
Shelan, 546, 547. 
Shenan, 537. 

Shepherd, George, 224, 622. 

Rev. John, 622. 
William, 220. 

Sherar, John, 12. 
Sheridan, Sir Thomas, 409. 
Sherriff, James, 223. 

John, 222. 

Sherriff-muir, 119, 120, 121. 
Shiells, 195. 
Shiney, Margaret, 225. 
Shinnie, Alexander, 219. 
Shothoesly, 299. 
Showan, Peter, 223. 
Sibbald, Mr., 34. 
Siddall, Thomas, 442. 
Sievewright, James, 68, So. 
Sikes, Joseph, 379. 
Sim or Syme, Convener, 212, 214, 216, 218. 

- George, 239. 
James, 222. 

John, 221, 611, 614. 
Sime, Rev. Mr., 316. 
Simpson, George, 223, 225. 

Rot., 14. 

Thomas, 223. 

William, 14, 206, 212, 214,216, 218 
Simsone, William, 43. 
Sinahard, 21, 23, 114, 118. 
Sincklair, George, 45. 
Sinclair, 151. 

- Alexander, 221, 239. 
Hugh, 402, 413, 469. 

John, 239. 
Mr., 146. 

Sink lairs, 172. 
Skellater, 14, 21, 23. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



649 



Skene, Dr. Andrew, 236, 237, 265, 266, 
271. 

Francis, 224, 233. 

Janet, 220. 

ofRubislaw, 206, 214, 216, 218, 219. 
Skinner, Robert, 224, 305. 

Skye, Isle of, 142, 143, 144, 168, 169, 540. 

Slate, 143, 144, 168. 

Sligo, John, 221. 

Slisgarrow, 541. 

Slismine, 540, 541. 

Slorach, John, 291. 

Small, John, 12. 

William, 12. 
Smart, John, 406. 
Smith, Alderman, 288. 

Alexander, 34, 206, 214, 218, 224, 

404, 437, 477, 611. 

Andrew, 611. 

Betty, 231, 232. 

Daniel, 262. 

Edward, 405, 454. 

George, 220. 

James, 13, 221, 224, 225, 233, 256, 

260, 263, 593. 

John, 223, 612, 613. 
Robert, 221. 

William, 9, 15, 40, 45, 221, 225, 237. 

Rev. William, 592, 594. 
Souper, Patrick, 222. 

William, 41, 45. 
Soutor, Dougal, 614. 
Spark, Thomas, 224. 
Sparks, James, 290. 
Spence, Nicol, 32. 
Spey, 405. 
Speyside, 404. 

Spidiman, David, 47, 48, 222. 

Spruel, Andrew, 611. 

Sprule, Andrew, 408. 

Squyre, Mr., 319. 

Staffordshire, 291. 

Stamford, Mr., 287. 

Stapleton, Brigadier, 297. 

Stark, Thomas, 399. 

Steell, George, 264. 

Stephen, James, 17. 

Stepler, 547. 

Steuart, James, of Achorachan, 16. 

John, of Drumminn, 18. 

Patrick, of Tambae, 16. 
Stevenson, Robert, 222. 

William, 225. 
Stewart, Alexander, 12, 17, 220. 

Rev. Alexander, 617. 

Allan, 406, 408, 410, 454, 476, 478, 

481, 614. 

And., 8. 



Stewart, Callom, 10. 

Captain, 39. 

David, 405, 407. 

Donald, 9, n, 12, 433, 434, 452, 

460, 471, 570. 

Duncan, 539, 613. 

Gavan, 18. 

George, y r . of Inverchatt, 20. 

James, 16, 18, 27, 480, 531, 611. 

Sir James, of Goodtrees, 52, 116. 

John, 8, 9, 10, 12, 16, 18, 34, 225. 

John Roy, 352, 367, 368, 453. 

Malcolm, 612. 
Mr., 336. 

Patrick, 16, 617. 
Robert, 39, 41, 47, 48, 51. 

Thomas, 16, 17. 

William, II, 17. 

Rev. William, 33, 35. 

Stewarts of Appine, 143, 144, 154, 168, 
172, 174, 362. 

of Ardshiel, 154, 346, 362. 

of Cairntullie, 170. 
of Garntilly, 172. 

of Innernettie, 159. 
Still, George, 221, 239. 

Robert, 220. 

Stirling, 148, 169, 239, 296, 350, 351, 352, 

368, 387, 398, 399, 400, 401, 403, 

407, 411, 623. 
Stirling of Keir, 154, 159. 
Stone, Mr., 399. 

Stonehaven, 124, 125, 248, 268, 272, 369. 
Stoneywood, 245, 247, 254. 255, 256, 257, 

258, 270, 299, 404, 405, 406, 407, 

408. 

Stormonth, James, 398, 399. 
Straandhalricl;, 570. 
Strachan, Alexander, 41, 43, 48. 51. 

Rev. Alexander, 622. 

James, 206, 215, 218, 220, 221, 225, 

233- 

John, 206, 208, 212, 214, 216, 217, 

219, 222, 231, 259, 262, 305. 

Michael, 13. 
Robert, 21, 23, 48. 

Thomas, 47, 48. 

William, 51, 195, 206, 212, 214, 

216, 218, 220, 225, 230. 
Stranever, Lord, I. 

Strange, Sir John, 337, 373, 380, 382, 386. 
Stranlarg, 576. 
Straq". Charles, 13. 

John, 13. 
Straquhan, Alexander, of Glenkindie, 13, 

21, 23. 

Strathallan, Lord, 313, 340, 341, 342, 364, 
385, 411, 412, 623, 624. 



650 



INDEX OK NAMES AND PLACES. 



Strathallan, Master of, 342. 
Strathardel, 170. 
Stratharrigg, 171. 
Strathavin, 16, 171, 506, 546. 
Strathbogie, 34, 37, 171, 198, 255, 258, 

301, 302, 303, 315, 320, 544, 546, 

554, 572, 584. 
Strathbran, 170. 
Strathcluny, 526, 549, 567. 
Strathdon, 13, 66, no, HI, 112, 113, 232, 

251, 310, 504, 622. 
Strathern (or earn), 171, 493. 
Strathcrrick (or erich), 538, 539, 550, 568, 

5 6 9. 576, 577- 
Strathfillan, 516. 

Strathglass, 144, 145, 155, 172, 537, 549, 

5 6 7, 574- 
Strathkerry, 582. 
Strathmashie, 573. 
Strathmore, Lady, 126. 
Strathnairn, 171, 493, 576. 
Strathnaver, 172. 
Strathnern, 171. 
Strathpeffer, 403. 
Strathspey, 171. 
Strathtay, 170. 
Strausvoilie, 550. 
Strickland, Colonel, 453. 
Stronach, James, 220. 

John, 223, 258, 268. 
Stronaclaker, 514, 542, 578. 
Stronlian, 533, 534, 554, 566, 572. 
Strowen, 143, 144, 170. 
Sullivan, 346, 347, 409. 
Sutherland, 145, 411, 412. 

Donald, 613. 

Earl of, 145, 172, 402, 411. 

Kenneth, 206, 225. 
Sutherlands and Strathnaver, 144. 
Sutherlands, 172. 
Suttem, Thomas, 272. 
Swan, Alexander, 15. 
Swape, Patrick, 41. 
Swarkstone-Uridge, 290. 
Swettenham, Captain, 533, 534, 547, 548, 
554, 555, 56, 572, 573, 579, 580. 
Swin, 143. 
Swinard, 143. 
Swiney, Lady, 412, 413. 
Swynard, 509. 
Syme, Andrew, 223. 

Rev. Walter, 622. 
Symon, Al., 12. 
Symone, James, 8. 
Symson, William, 195, 224. 

Tail, Alexander, 222. 
Talbet, 332, 334, 335. 



Talbot, Major, 280. 

Tambae, 16. 

Tarbet, Viscount of, i, 25. 

Tarland, 232, 306, 310, 311, 490, 491, 

492, 494, 496, 499, 54, 51, 5*8, 

622. 

Taws, John, 75. 
Tay, 540. 

Loch, 582. 

Taybridge, 494, 499, 510, 512. 
Taylor, Alexander, 591. 

Christopher, 435. 

- James, 224. 

John, 215, 218, 222. 

William, 53. 
Taymont, 409. 
Teindrum, 494. 
Temple, William, 221. 
Terpersie, 20, 23, 88, 89. 
Thain, Mr., 68, 118. 

Thorn, James, 197, 220, 235, 262, 264. 

John, 220. 

William, 235, 265, 266. 
Thomas, Andrew, 222. 
Thompson, Andrew, 45. 
Thomson, Abraham, 224. 

- Al., 14. 

Alexander, 9, 206, 212, 214, 216, 

218, 220, 221, 225, 226, 230, 261, 
264, 273, 611. 

Andrew, 9, 195, 206, 215, 218, 222. 
J., 195, 206, 215, 218, 221, 225, 

257, 259. 

Mary, 225. 
Rev. Pat., 622. 

Robert, 207, 212, 222, 233, 305. 
Thomas, 9. 

William, 220. 
Thomsone, George, 91. 
Thorntown, 301. 
Thurso, 402, 403, 413. 
Tickeka, Doughe, 541. 
Tilliechetlie, 21. 
Tillyfour, 260. 
Toash, Magnus, 269. 

Tod, William, 438, 467, 478. 

Tolmie, Peter, 225. 

Tooip, Robert, 223. 

Tomantoul, 544, 546, 547, 554, 563, 572, 

584- 

Tombrachie, 547. 
Torban, 545. 
Tornachalt, 547. 
Torryhill, 299. 
Torwood, 294, 296. 
Tory, 299. 
Tosh, John, 226. 
Touch, 118. 



INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES. 



6 5 I 



Tough, 622. 

_ Alexander, 220. 

_ John, II4> "9. 12 - 

I William', 55. 56, "4- "8, 2 ' t21 - 
Touneshend, Lord Viscount, 52. 
Toux, 23. 
Tower, John, 222. 
Towie, 13, 2 3 2 . 622 - , 

_ of Clate, 62, 63, 64. 
Townley, Francis, 373, 33. 449- 
Trail, John, 223. 

_ William, 612. 
Tranent, 279, 280. 
Traquair, 332, 333- 
Tray, 533, 534, 535, 565, 579- 
Trent, 290. 

Tripland, Sir David, 159- 
Troment, John Baptist, 402. 
Troup, , 225. 

_ William, 222. 
Tullibardine, Marquis of, 288, 3' 3- j3, 

372, 617. 
Tulliechoy, 12. 
Tullinesle, 622. 
Tulloch, 88, 90. 
Tumble, 540. 
Turk, Bridge of, 542, 552. 
Turnbull, Corporal, 566, 567- 

T-, >95> 206, 2I 5' 2I ' ' * 

257, 259- 

Turner, Alaster, 18. 
_ Andrew, 222. 
_ George, 215, 218. 
_ William, 1 6. 
Turriff, 303, 45- s ,, 

Tweddale, Marquis of, 317, J IB > 3>* 
Tytler, Alexander, 223. 

Udny, 239, 3'- 
Uist, I43> 59- 
Ulbster, 146, 7 2 - 
Urquhart, Dr. James, 595- 

Ton, John, 29, 39O, 396, 433, 434, 
460,464,471,472,476. 

Vass, William, 401. 
Vaughan, William, 449- 

Vere, John, 34L " se 'l- ,, 
Vemer, D.,22l,233, 239, 266. 

Wade, General, 143, > 6 5, 237, 283, 286, 

Wakeman, Ensign, 566, 568- 
Wales, Charles, Prince of, 209, ft seq. 

George, 236, 245, 2 59- 
Walhouse, 101. 



Walker, Alexander, 22O. 

. Andrew, 195, 220, 221, 234, 244, 

275- 

George, 195- 457- 
_ James, 225. 

John, 114. "7, 223. 

_ William, 195, 206, 215, 2ib, 22O, 
221, 585, 586,611. 

Walkingshaw, John, of Scotstown, 159. 
Wallace, Richard, 224. 
Walton, 450. 

Warrander, Robert, 585, 5&o. 
Warren, James, 377, 44L 44- 
Watson, Alexander, 221. 
_ Christian, 223. 
_ I.ieut.-Col., 304, 300, 38, 49, 

512, 522. 
George, 223. 
_ John, 220. 

Thomas, 18, 224, 467- 
Watt, James, 391. 
Wear (or Weir), Mr., 284. 
Webb, Philip C, 4^3- 
Webster, James, 261. 
Wedderburn, Sir John, 455, OII> 
Weem, 17. 

Weir, Arthur, 114, 8i U 9- 
Werrel, Charles, 380. 
Westland, Alexander, 22O. 
Wetherburn, Mr., 554- 
Whately, Edward, 238. 
White, Alexander, 611. 

John, 397, 433, 475- 
Whitewreath, 34- 
Whitford, Colonel. 280, 281. 
Whithaugh, 20, 23. 
Whithouse, 20, 23. 
Whitten, 324. 
Whyte, Andrew, 45. 
Wiggan, 285, 354, 37 2 - 
Wicht, Barbara, 223. 

Hary, 235, 238, 244, 262, 264, 265, 

267. 

Wigtoun, Lord, 154- 
Wilding, James, 429. 
William, Tames, U4, "8. "9, I2 ' 
- John, 114, n 8, 119, 120,464- 

WiiliamsonTjohn, 397, 399, 438, 465- 

_ William, 259, 268. 
Wills, Lord Chief Justice, 399. 

_ William, 68, 39, 396, 398, 434, 

Wilson, Atexafdl'rfso, 81, 101, 102, 103. 

George, 220. 

_ James, 68, So, 264, 401. 
_ Jean, 224. 

John, 438. 



6 5 2 



INDEX OF NAMES AND 1'LACES. 



Wilson, Serjeant, 274, 275, 276. 
Thomas, 225. 

William, 359, 482. 
Wilsone, George, 20, 23, 225. 
Wishart, John, 260. 

William, 231, 259. 
Wood, Andrew, 453, 611. 

- John, Esq., 322. 
Worthington, William, 475. 
Wright, George, 224, 436. 
Wyn, Sir Watkins William-, 533. 
Wynne, Serjeant, 385. 

Yarmouth, Countess of, 328. 



Yeat, John, 14. 
Yeats, Alexander, 224. 
Yeild, William, 13. 
Youge, Sir William, 331. 
Yoirll, John, 221. 
Young, Alexander, 612. 

David, 239. 

ffrancis, 12. 

James, 222, 224, 226. 

John, 236, 245, 259. 

Walter, 438, 478. 

William, 58, 224. 
Younkson, William, 476. 
Yowish, William, u. 



UV MILNE ANl> HUTCHISON, ABtKDEBN. 




NINTH REPORT BY COUNCIL 



'895 



feto Spalbtng Club. 

Founded nth November, 1886. 



fJiitroncas : 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 



1895-96. 



flrcsibciU 
THE EARL OF ABERDEEN, LL.D. 



THE DUKE OF RICHMOND AND GORDON, 

D.C.L., LL.D. 
THE DUKE OF FIFE, K.T. 
THE MARQUIS OF HUNTLY, LL.D. 
THE MARQUIS OF BUTE, K.T., LL.D. 
THE EARL OF ERROLL, LL.D. 
THE EARL OF STRATHMORE. 
THE EARL OF SOUTHESK, K.T., LL.D. 
THE EARL OF KINTORE, LL.D. 



K.G., 



THE EARL OF ROSEBERY, K.G., LL.D. 

THE LORD FORBES. 

THE LORD SALTOUN. 

THE LORD PROVOST OF ABERDEEN. 

THE PRINCIPAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN. 

SIR GEORGE REID, P.R.S.A., LL.D. 

JAMES A. CAMPBELL of Stracathro, M.P., LL.D. 

WILLIAM FK.RGUSON of Kinmundy, LL.D. 

EMERITUS PROFESSOR DAVID MASSON, LL.D. 



^Umbers of (Tonncil : 



Colonel James Allardyce of Culquoich, LL.D. 

John Bulloch, Aberdeen. 

George Cadenhead, Procurator-Fiscal. Aberdeen. 

The Rev. James Cooper, D.D., Aberdeen. 

William Cramond, LL.D., Culler. 

Peter M. Cran, City Chamberlain, Aberdeen. 

The Rev. J. Myers' Danson, D.D., Aberdeen. 

Charles B. Davidson, LL.D., President of the 

Society of Advocates in Aberdeen. 
The Hon. and Right Rev. Bishop Douglas, D.D., 

Aberdeen. 

William Dunn of Murtle. 
John Philip Edmond, Haigh. 
James Ferguson, Edinburgh. 
Alexander M. Gordon of Nev.'ton. 
Henry Wolrige-Gordon of Esslemont. 
The Rev. Walter Gregor, LL.D.. Bonnyrigg. 
John A. Henderson, Aberdeen. 
Sir William Henderson, LL.D. Aberdeen. 
Brigade-Surgeon Lieut. -Col. W. Johnston of 

Newton Dee, M.D. 

The Rev. William Forbes-Leith, S.J., Selkirk. 
George Arbuthnot-I.eslie of Warthill. 



The Rev. Robert Lippe, LL.D., Aberdeen. 

David Littlejohn, Sheriff-Clerk, Aberdeen. 

Peter Duguid-M'Combie of Easter Skene. 

James Matthews of Springhill, LL.D. 

The Rev. John G. Michie, Din.net. 

James Moir, LL.D., Co-Rector of the Grammar 

School, Aberdeen. 
Alexander M. Munro, Aberdeen. 
Charles Rampini, LL.D., Sheriff-Substitute, Elgin. 
Alexander Ramsay, LL.D., Banff. 
Alexander W. Robertson, Librarian, Public Library, 

Aberdeen. 

John Forbes Robertson, London. 
The Rev. James Smith, B.D., Aberdeen. 
David Stewart of Banchory, LL.D. 
The Rev. William Temple, D.D., Forgue. 
Alexander Walker, LL.D., Aberdeen. 
George Walker, Aberdeen. 
Robert Walker, University of Aberdeen. 
John Forbes White, LL.D., Dundee. 
Professor John Dove Wilson, LL.D., Aberdeen. 
Robert M. Wilson, M.D., Old Deer. 
The Rev. John Woodward, LL.D., Montrose. 



PETER JOHN ANDERSON, University Library, Aberdeen. 

treasurer : 
FARQUHARSON TAYLOR GARDEN, 18 Golden Square, Aberdeen. 



GEORGE COOPER. C.A., Aberdeen ; and WILLIAM MILNE, C.A., Aberdeen. 






NINTH REPORT BY THE COUNCIL. 

Approved at the Ninth Annual General Meeting of the New Spalding Club, 
held on Friday, 20ih December, 1895, at 3 p.m. 

SINCE the last General Meeting of the Club, held on Friday, 
2ist December, 1894, one volume has been issued to Mem- 
bers : 

I. HISTORICAL PAPERS RELATING TO THE JACOBITE PERIOD, 
1699-1750. Edited by Colonel James Allardyce, 
LL.D. Vol. I. (Pp. 1. + 338, with eleven plates.) 

An unfortunate delay in the preparation of a plate has 
prevented the simultaneous distribution of the other volume 
assigned to 1895, which, however, is otherwise ready, and will 
soon be issued, viz. : 

II. MUSA LATINA ABERDONENSIS. Vol. II. Arthur 
Johnston's Epigrammata and the remaining secular 
poems. Edited by Principal Sir William D. 
Geddes, LL.D. (Pp. Ivi. + 307, with nine plates.) 

From the unexpected accumulation of material in Colonel 
Allardyce's hands, it was found necessary to devote two volumes 
to the work edited by him. The second is in an advanced state 
of preparation. 



For next year the Editorial Committee have approved the 
issue of : 

I. .HISTORICAL PAPERS RELATING TO THE JACOBITE PERIOD, 
1699-1750. Edited by Colonel James Allardyce, 
LL.D. Vol. II. Of this volume 142 pages are 
already printed off and eight plates are also in 
readiness. 

II. FASTI ACADEMIAE MARISCALLANAE. SELECTIONS FROM 
THE RECORDS OK MARISCHAL COLLEGE AND 
UNIVERSITY. Edited by the Secretary. Vol. IT. 
The first volume, issued in 1889, dealt with the 
endowments of the College. The second will 
contain the lists of officers, graduates and alumni, 
1600-1860, which have been transcribed from 
the original records by the Editor ; together with 
extracts from the Visitations of the College, from 
the Minutes of the Senatus, and from the Council 
Register of the burgh of Aberdeen. As noted in 
former Reports, illustrations for this volume have 
been presented by the late Dr. Francis Edmond 
(of the Heraldic Ceiling of old Marischal College), 
by Dr. Alexander Cruickshank (of his father, Pro- 
fessor John Cruickshank), by Dr. Joseph Ogilvie 
(of Dr. James Melvin), and by Surgeon-Colonel 
Johnston (of his collateral ancestor, Professor 
William Johnston). The Editorial Committee have 
further approved the inclusion of portraits of a few 
others of the many eminent teachers and alumni of 
the College, to be selected from such as the following 
list suggested by Professor Masson: John Arbuthnot, 
Neil Arnott, James Beattie, Bishop Gilbert Burnet, 
James Burnett (Lord Monboddo), John Hill Burton, 






Principal George Campbell, William Dyce, James 
Gibbs, Robert Gordon of Straloch, James Gregory, 
Field- Marshal James Keith, Sir James M'Grigor, 
Colin Maclaurin, James Clerk Maxwell, Sir James 
Outram, Thomas Reid, John Skinner. 

The issues for 1897 will be selected from among the 
following, the first twelve of which are in progress under 
their respective editors : 

III. BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE SHIRES OF ABERDEEN, BANFF 
AND KINCARDINE. Edited by A. W. Robertson, 
M.A., Librarian of the Public Library, Aberdeen. 
The works that come within the Editor's scope are : 
(i) Those which have been printed and published 
in the district ; (2) those which treat of it in its 
historical, topographical, or other relations ; (3) 
those which owe their origin to authors born or, 
at the date of publication, resident in the district, 
though these works may have been published else- 
where. Contributions to magazines or similar 
works, which have not been issued in separate 
form, broadsheets, and the works (published else- 
where) of authors who may be related to the district 
but are not themselves natives of it, are meanwhile 
not included. The volume will be illustrated with 
facsimiles and portraits. 

IV. FOLKLORE OF NORTH-EASTERN SCOTLAND. Edited by 
the Rev. Walter Gregor, LL. D., Bonnyrigg. 

V. DIARY OF THE SCOTS COLLEGE AT DOUAI, AND 
NECROLOGIES OF THE SCOTS COLLEGES AT RATIS- 
BON AND PARIS. Edited by the Rev. W. Forbes- 
Leith, S.J., Selkirk. 



6 

VI. REGISTER OF THE SCOTS COLLEGE AT ROME. Edited 
by the Right Rev. Monsignor Campbell, D.D., 
Rector of the College. 

VII. RECORDS FROM THE ARCHIVES OF MIDDELBURG, 
FLUSHING, CAMPVERE, ETC. Edited by the Rev. A. 
W. Frater, M.A., Minister of the Scotch Church, 
Middelburg. 

VIII. HISTORY OF THE FAMILY OF BURNETT. Edited by 
the late Lyon, George Burnett, LL.D. 

IX. PLACE NAMES OF ABERDEENSHIRE. Edited by James 
Macdonald, Huntly. 

X. RECORDS OF THE PRESBYTERY OF ALFORD, 1662-88. 
Edited by the Rev. Thomas Bell, M.A., Minister of 
Keig. 

XI. -RECORDS OF THE SYNOD OF MORAY, ETC. : with Fasti 
of Schoolmasters. Edited by the Rev. Stephen 
Ree, B.D., Minister of Boharm. 

XII. PAPERS OF DAVID SKENE, M.D. Edited by 
J. W. H. Trail, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany 
in the University of Aberdeen. 

XIII. RECORDS OF OLD ABERDEEN. Edited by Alex- 
ander M. Munro. This will incorporate the more 
reliable portions of Orem's work, with extracts from 
the records of the Town Council (from 1602) ; Trades 
(from 1608); Kirk Session (from 1621); Merchant 
Society (from 1686), etc. 

XIV. COLLECTIONS ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE HISTORY OF 
KINCARDINESHIRE OR THE MEARNS. Edited by the 
Rev. Douglas Gordon Barron, B.D., Minister of 
Dunottar. 



XV. COLLECTIONS ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE HISTORY OF 

FORFARSHIRE OR ANGUS. 

XVI. THE MISCELLANY OK THE CLUB. Vol. II. For 
this several interesting papers have been promised. 

XVII. HISTORY OF THE FAMILY OF FORBES. 

XVI 1 1. RECORDS OF THEMATURIN, DOMINICAN, CARMELITE, 
AND FRANCISCAN FRIARS OF ABERDEEN, 1211-1560. 

XIX. ICONOGRAPHIA ScOTICA SEPTENTRIONALIS ; being a 

catalogue raisonnc* of extant portraits, original or 
engraved, of eminent persons connected with the 
North of Scotland ; with reproductions of selected 
portraits. It is intended to issue a circular letter 
to members of the Club and others likely to be 
interested in this work, inviting information and 
co-operation. 

The Treasurer is again able to report no members as in 
arrears: 494 subscriptions having been paid for the year 1895, 
while there are six Life Members. The total receipts, since 
the Club was resuscitated in 1886, amount to /4973 4 s - 7^- 
(including ^63 in compositions from the Life Members) : the 
total expenditure amounts to ^"4407 i6s. 8d. 

Since the last Report was submitted by the Council, ten 
members of the Club have died : the Rev. William Christie, 
Marnoch ; Mrs. Coutts, Banff; Mr. Alexander Davidson of Dess 
(an original member of the Spalding Club and a member of the 
Council of the New Spalding Club); Mr. Edward Fisher, New- 
ton Abbot ; Mr. William Gordon, Aberdeen ; the Rev. John 
Brodie Innes of Milton Brodie ; Major John Ramsay of Barra (a 
member of the Council) ; Mr. George Thompson of Pitmedden 
(another original member of the Spalding Club) ; Mr. John C. 



8 

Thomson, Stonehaven ; Mr. James Walker, Aberdeen ; all 
members in their several spheres much and justly regretted. 

Of the original members of the old Spalding Club, founded 
23rd December, 1839, only three now survive, all members of 
the New Spalding Club. 

The representatives of the deceased members have, in 
several cases, expressed a wish to join the Club, but in others 
the vacancies are still unfilled, and the Secretary will receive 
applications for admission. 

The Council would acknowledge their continued obligation 
to the Society of Advocates for permitting the Annual General 
Meeting of the Club to be held in the Society's Hall ; and to 
the Public Library Committee, and the Curator of the University 
Library, for granting the use of rooms for Committee Meetings. 

WM. D. GEDDES, C. 



9 

ABSTRACT 

Framed from the Annual Accounts of the Club for the period from 
iyth December, 1894, to I2th December, 1895. 

THE CHARGE. 

Assets at close of Last Account, . . 516 10 9 

Subscriptions for year 1895,* . . . 510 6 o 
Subscriptions for year 1896, . . . 990 

Subscription for year 1887, . . . i i o 

Payments by members for back volumes, . 8 18 6 

Bank Interest, 7 13 n 

Amount of the Charge, .... 1053 19 2 



THE DISCHARGE. 

1895. I. MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS PAID. 

Jan. 8. Grosvenor, Chater & Co. (per 

Edmond & Spark), . . . 109 o 7 

,, 16. T. & R. Annan & Sons, Glasgow, o 12 ij 

,, 24. Rev. Walter Gregor, LL.D., . 7 9 10 

Feb. 19. Thomas Moring, London, . . i 3 8J 

May 29. Edmond & Spark, . . . 5 5 o 

June 3. A. King & Co., . . . . 4 19 9 

,, 17. T. & R. Annan & Sons, . . 16100 

July 29. Miss M. Craig, . . . . o 15 6 

Nov. 23. Milne & Hutchison, . . . 73 19 i 

,, ,, T. & R. Annan & Sons, . . 33 o o 

,, 25. Edmond & Spark, . . . 7 5 

Dec. 1 1. Edmond & Spark, . . . 43 6 o 

A. King & Co., . . . . 84 17 5 

,, Taylor & Henderson, . . . 6 10 o 

G. W. Wilson & Co., Ltd., . . 61110 

449 7 5 

Forward, 449 7 5 

* Note. At the close of the account the membership of the Club stood as follows : 

Life members, 6 

Members that paid for 1894 during period of last account, ... 8 
Do. do. do. present account, . . 486 

Total 5 



10 

Brought forward, 449 7 5 

II. SECRETARY AND HONORARY TREASURER. 

Secretary's Salary, 1894-95, . . . 26 5 o 
Secretary's Postages, i8th Dec., 1894, to date, 678 
Hon. Treasurer's sundry outlays, including 

Insurance on paper, etc., . . . 6 n 2 

39 3 10 

III. ASSETS AS AT IZTH DECEMBER, 1895. 

Deposit Receipt with Town and County 
Bank, Ltd., dated i2th December, 1895, 
being Composition received from six 
Life Members (see footnote on preced- 
ing page), . . 63 o. o 

Five do., with do., of same date, . . 502 7 n 

565 7 ii 






Amount of the Discharge, equal to the Charge, 1053 19 2 



Note i. It should be observed that 36 135. yd. of the cost of " Hist. Papers," Vol. I., 
appeared in last year's Abstract ; and that the cost of the binding, packing, and carriage of 
" Musa Lat. Aberd.," Vol. II. (probably about ,41), will appear in next year's Abstract. On 
the other hand, 21 i6s. id. has this year been paid on account of a volume assigned to 1896. 

Note 2. The Miscellaneous Disbursements above are allocated as follows : 

I. " HISTORICAL PAPERS." VOL. I. 

Paper, 13 reams (for printing 180 pp.), ...... 28 7 o 

Printing : Milne & Hutchison, 49 sheets, per estimate, . . . 69 16 6 

,, ,, ,, Corrections, etc., . . . . 427 

Illustrations : Wilson, . . . . . . . . . 48 13 o 

Binding : Edmond & Spark, Cases, per estimate, . . . . 22 i 8 

,, ,, Add for Extra Plates, etc., . . 479 

,, ,, ,, Brass Stamp for Lettering, . . o 13 o 

Packing, . . . . . . . . . . . 4511 

Carriage, 10 5 o 



* Together with 36 135. 7d. from last account : in all 229 6s. od. 



II 

II. "MusA LATINA ABERDONENSIS. " VOL. II. 

Paper, 27 reams (for printing 376 pp., including Report, etc.), . 58 17 6 

Printing: King & Co., 45^ sheets, per estimate, . . . . 64 16 9 

,i Extra for Small Type, etc., . . . 1170 

>, Corrections, . . . . . . 8 13 8 

Illustrations: Annan, ...... . . . 33 o o 

,, Wilson, 12 18 o 

,, Taylor & Henderson, 6 10 o 

196 2 ii 

III. " HISTORICAL PAPERS." VOL. II. 
Paper, 10 reams (for printing 142 pp.), . . . . . . . . 21 16 i 

IV. SUNDRIES. 

Repaid Rev. Walter Gregor's Outlays, j g 10 

Printing Reports, Circulars, etc., . . . . . . . 4 19 9 

Miscellaneous Transcribing, Photographing, etc., . . . 17 17 7^ 

Stationery, etc., .......... 8 8 gj 

38 16 o 

Amount of Miscellaneous Disbursements, as above, ..... 449 7 5 



12 



RULES. 

(As altered, list December, 1894.) 

1. The objects of the New Spalding Club shall be to promote the study of the 

History, Topography, and Archaeology of the North-Eastern Counties of 
Scotland, and to print works illustrative thereof. 

2. The Club shall consist of five hundred members, subscribers of one guinea 

annually : each subscription to be paid on or before the first day of 
January in each year. 

3. The general management of the affairs of the Club shall be vested in a 

Council, consisting of a President, at least ten Vice-Presidents, and not 
fewer than forty ordinary members, including a Secretary and a Treasurer : 
all to be chosen yearly at a General Meeting of the Club, to be held at 
Aberdeen, in the Month of October, or at such other time within each year 
as may be found convenient. At all Meetings of the Council seven members 
shall form a quorum. 

4. Immediately after the Annual General Meeting the Council shall elect Acting 

Committees to carry on the work of the Club. 

5. The accounts of the Club shall be audited annually, by two Auditors, to be chosen 

at the Annual Meeting from among the members. 

6. The name of any member in arrear with his annual subscription on the first day 

of October in each year may be removed from the list of members. 

7. Vacancies in the membership shall be filled up according to priority of application. 

8. Members may, at any time, compound for all future annual subscriptions, by 

payment of ten guineas over and above the subscription for the current year ; 
and it shall be in the power of the Council to exempt from subscriptions, 
annual or other, any member who may present to the Club a work, the 
printing of which, as a Club publication, has been sanctioned by the Council. 

9. Every member shall receive one copy of every volume assigned by the Club to 

the years for which he has paid subscriptions ; and the editor of each 
work shall receive five additional copies of his work. The heir, executor 
or representative of a member shall have no claim to volumes issued by 
the Club after the member's death, unless he be admitted a member of the 
Club in place of the deceased. 



10. The number of copies printed in each case shall not exceed five hundred 

and twenty-five, and no copy of any work printed by the Club shall be 
offered by it for sale. 

11. The Club shall undertake the issue of its books without the intervention of 

publishers or booksellers. 

12. A General Meeting of the Club may be called at any time on presentation to the 

- Secretary of a requisition signed by twenty members ; and the above rules 
may be altered at any General Meeting, provided that the members have 
received from the Secretary at least fourteen days' notice of the proposed 
change. 



14 
WORKS ISSUED BY THE NEW SPALDING CLUB. 

MEMORIALS OF THE FAMILY OF SKENE OF SKENE, FROM THE FAMILY PAPERS, 
WITH OTHER ILLUSTRATIVE DOCUMENTS. Edited by William Forbes 
Skene, D.C.L., LL.D., Her Majesty's Historiographer for Scotland. (Pp. 
1887 | 269 + xv., with six full-page plates. First Annual Report.) 

CARTULARIUM ECCLESIAE SANCTI NICHOLAI ABERDONENSIS. Recognovit Jaco- 
bus Cooper, A.M., in Ecclesia supradicta Presbyter. Tomus prior. (Pp. 
278 + xix., with three plates. List of members, nth November, 1887.) 



1888 LACUNAR BASILICAE SANCTI MACARII ABERDONENSIS: The Heraldic Ceiling of 

the Cathedral Church of St. Machar, Old Aberdeen. Described in His- 
torical and Armorial Detail by William Duguid Geddes, LL.D., and Peter 
Duguid. (Pp. 172 + xix., with thirty plates, twenty-four in heraldic colours. 
Second Annual Report.) 

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HECTORIS BOETII MURTHLACENSIUM ET ABERDONENSIUM EPISCOPORUM VITAE. 
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FASTI ACADEMIAE MARISCALLANAE : Selections from the Records of Marischal 
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